Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. TPE331 Series Turboprop, and TSE331-3U Model Turboshaft Engines, 38054-38059 [06-5929]

Download as PDF 38054 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Rules and Regulations comments on the NPRM or on the determination of the cost to the public. Conclusion We have carefully reviewed the available data and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting the AD as proposed. Costs of Compliance There are about 250 airplanes of the affected design in the worldwide fleet. This AD will affect about 152 airplanes of U.S. registry. The required actions will take about 9 work hours per airplane, at an average labor rate of $80 per work hour. Required parts will cost about $2,385 per airplane. Based on these figures, the estimated cost of this AD for U.S. operators is $471,960, or $3,105 per airplane. Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ‘‘General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. jlentini on PROD1PC65 with RULES Regulatory Findings We have determined that this AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:52 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 We prepared a regulatory evaluation of the estimated costs to comply with this AD and placed it in the AD docket. See the ADDRESSES section for a location to examine the regulatory evaluation. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: I PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: I Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): I 2006–13–18 McDonnell Douglas: Amendment 39–14671. Docket No. FAA–2006–24430; Directorate Identifier 2006–NM–048–AD. Effective Date (a) This AD becomes effective August 9, 2006. Affected ADs (b) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to McDonnell Douglas Model DC–9–31, DC–9–32, DC–9–32F, DC– 9–33F, DC–9–34, DC–9–34F, DC–9–41, and DC–9–51 airplanes, certificated in any category; as identified in Boeing Service Bulletin DC9–28–214, dated December 16, 2005. Unsafe Condition (d) This AD results from fuel system reviews conducted by the manufacturer. We are issuing this AD to prevent point-contact arcing or filament heating in the fuel tank, which, in the event of a short or ground fault inside the fuel tank, could result in a fuel tank explosion and consequent loss of the airplane. Compliance (e) You are responsible for having the actions required by this AD performed within the compliance times specified, unless the actions have already been done. Installation (f) Within 60 months after the effective date of this AD, install a bonding jumper from the boost pump volute to the fuel tank structure, and do all applicable related investigative and corrective actions before further flight; by doing all the actions specified in the Accomplishment PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Instructions of Boeing Service Bulletin DC9– 28–214, dated December 16, 2005. Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (g)(1) The Manager, Los Angeles Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested in accordance with the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. (2) Before using any AMOC approved in accordance with § 39.19 on any airplane to which the AMOC applies, notify the appropriate principal inspector in the FAA Flight Standards Certificate Holding District Office. Material Incorporated by Reference (h) You must use Boeing Service Bulletin DC9–28–214, dated December 16, 2005, to perform the actions that are required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of this document in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Long Beach Division, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, California 90846, Attention: Data and Service Management, Dept. C1–L5A (D800–0024), for a copy of this service information. You may review copies at the Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street SW., Room PL–401, Nassif Building, Washington, DC; on the Internet at http://dms.dot.gov; or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at the NARA, call (202) 741–6030, or go to http:// www.archives.gov/federal_register/ code_of_federal_regulations/ ibr_locations.html. Issued in Renton, Washington, on June 22, 2006. Kalene C. Yanamura, Acting Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 06–5871 Filed 7–3–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2006–23704; Directorate Identifier 2006–NE–02–AD; Amendment 39– 14674; AD 2006–14–03] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. TPE331 Series Turboprop, and TSE331–3U Model Turboshaft Engines Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: E:\FR\FM\05JYR1.SGM 05JYR1 jlentini on PROD1PC65 with RULES Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Rules and Regulations SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Honeywell International Inc. TPE331 series turboprop, and TSE331–3U model turboshaft engines. This AD requires implementing a new flight cycle counting method for first, second, and third-stage turbine rotors used in aircraft that make multiple takeoffs and landings without an engine shutdown, and removing turbine rotors from service that have reached or exceeded their cycle life limits. This new flight cycle counting method requires determining total equivalent cycles accrued. This AD results from several reports of uncontained turbine rotor separation on engines used in specialuse operations. We are issuing this AD to prevent uncontained failure of the turbine rotor due to low-cycle-fatigue (LCF), and damage to the aircraft. DATES: This AD becomes effective August 9, 2006. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the regulations as of August 9, 2006. ADDRESSES: You can get the service information identified in this AD from Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, Technical Data Distribution, M/S 2101– 201, P.O. Box 52170, Phoenix, AZ 85072–2170; telephone: (602) 365–2493 (General Aviation); (602) 365–5535 (Commercial); fax: (602) 365–5577 (General Aviation and Commercial). You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://dms.dot.gov or in Room PL–401 on the plaza level of the Nassif Building, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joseph Costa, Aerospace Engineer, Los Angeles Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 3960 Paramount Blvd., Lakewood, CA 90712–4137; telephone (562) 627–5246; fax (562) 627–5210. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA proposed to amend 14 CFR part 39 with a proposed AD. The proposed AD applies to certain Honeywell International Inc. TPE331 series turboprop, and TSE331–3U model turboshaft engines. We published the proposed AD in the Federal Register on February 23, 2006 (71 FR 9281). That action proposed to require implementing a new flight cycle counting method for first, second, and third-stage turbine rotors used in aircraft that make multiple takeoffs and landings without an engine shutdown, and removing turbine rotors from service that have reached or exceeded their cycle life limits. This new flight cycle counting method requires VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:23 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 determining total equivalent cycles accrued. Examining the AD Docket You may examine the docket that contains the AD, any comments received, and any final disposition in person at the Docket Management Facility Docket Office between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The Docket Office (telephone (800) 647–5227) is located on the plaza level of the Department of Transportation Nassif Building at the street address stated in ADDRESSES. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after the DMS receives them. Comments We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the development of this AD. We have considered the comments received. Suggestion To Delete Phrase ‘‘To Ground Idle’’ One commenter suggests that in the Discussion paragraph of the proposed AD, we delete the phrase ‘‘to ground idle’’. Doing this would reconcile the Discussion paragraph with the Definition paragraph (i) in the compliance section, because touch-andgo maneuvers require the logging of partial cycles. A touch-and-go maneuver is a landing and takeoff without shutdown. We partially agree. The damage fraction for a minor cycle identified in the Honeywell Alert Service Bulletins is based on landings to normal ground-idle engine speed reductions without an engine shutdown. Any engine operation, such as a touch-and-go maneuver with an engine speed reduction to ground idle during touchdown, counts as a minor cycle. Engine speed reductions to ground idle during landing are an important factor in determining the counting of a minor cycle and, therefore, must be included in the definition. The AD does not repeat the proposed AD Discussion paragraph. We agree that the wording in our NPRM could be clearer. Therefore, we changed Definition paragraph (i), to include major and minor cycles, and paragraph (o), to state that a minor cycle, which occurs within a major cycle, is an additional landing with an engine speed reduction to ground idle with no engine shutdown, followed by a takeoff. Request To Change Compliance Section Paragraph (f)(1)(ii) One commenter requests that we change compliance section paragraph PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 38055 (f)(1)(ii) from ‘‘If you are unable to determine equivalent cycles for prior special-use operations, you must use a onetime takeoff-to-engine shutdown ratio of six to estimate prior special-use equivalent cycles for each turbine rotor’’ to ‘‘For turbine rotors known to have prior special use operation, if you are unable to determine equivalent cycles for prior special-use operations, you must use a onetime takeoff-to-engine shutdown ratio of six to estimate prior special-use equivalent cycles for each turbine rotor.’’ The commenter feels that this would clarify the phrase ‘‘unable to determine’’ because as-written it could be construed to mean that a rotor had special use operation, but exact minorto-major cycle count cannot be determined. We partially agree. We agree with the commenter’s application of the phrase ‘‘unable to determine’’ but we do not agree that paragraph (f)(1)(ii) should be changed. That paragraph must be read in context with paragraph (f), which clearly states ‘‘For turbine rotors installed before the effective date of this AD, and currently or previously used in special-use operations:’’ However, we did clarify paragraph (f)(1)(ii) to add the reason why the operator or owner would be unable to determine equivalent cycles. Request To Change the Phrase ‘‘Used Turbine Rotors’’ in Compliance Paragraph (f) One commenter requests that we change the phrase ‘‘used turbine rotors’’ in compliance paragraph (f) to ‘‘turbine rotors’’ as these rotors may have had zero cycles-since-new at installation. We agree. The compliance action is the same for new or used turbine rotors installed before the effective date of the AD. We made that change in the AD. Request To Add a Step to Compliance Paragraphs (f) and (g) One commenter requests that we add a step to compliance paragraphs (f) and (g) to include the new counting method, which is also referenced in paragraph (h)(1) of the compliance section. The commenter states that this counting method should be used after determining equivalent cycles, whether the turbine rotor is new or used. We partially agree. We agree that operators and maintenance personnel use the new counting method of counting major and minor cycles when accrued for new and used turbine rotors after the initial assessment from the Table 1 turbine removal schedules in the Honeywell ASBs. This schedule requires retiring the turbine rotors within a specified number of equivalent E:\FR\FM\05JYR1.SGM 05JYR1 38056 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Rules and Regulations cycles, which infers that the owner or operator use the new counting method with minor and major cycles. We changed compliance section paragraph (f)(1)(ii) to read ‘‘If you are unable to determine equivalent cycles for prior special-use operations due to the absence of actual data regarding the number of takeoffs and landings per major cycle, you must use a onetime ratio of six takeoffs and landings per major cycle to estimate prior special-use equivalent cycles for each turbine rotor’’. Also, for clarification, we changed compliance section paragraph (h)(1) to read ‘‘Use the new counting method by counting and recording minor and major cycles when accrued, and determine equivalent cycles by the method described in paragraph (f)(1)(i) and (f)(1)(iii) of this AD’’. In preparing the response to this commenter, we decided that proposed paragraphs (h) and (h)(2) could be clearer. Therefore, we changed compliance section paragraph (h) to read ‘‘For all new (zero cycles) turbine rotors installed on or after the effective date of this AD used in special-use operations:’’ and paragraph (h)(2) to read ‘‘Using the ratio of six takeoffs and landings per major cycle for unknown cycle history, as referenced in paragraph (f)(1)(ii) of this AD, is not permitted’’. jlentini on PROD1PC65 with RULES Comment That Previous Method of Counting Cycles Is Acceptable One commenter states that the previous method of counting cycles is acceptable and that major and minor counting is unnecessary. The commenter cites their ‘‘lower than redline’’ engine operation temperatures are an additional safety margin (excluding temperatures during startups and shutdowns). We do not agree. The new counting method is necessary to preclude fatigue damage of turbine rotors and is appropriate for most operations when considering engine operation temperatures and rotor speeds. We did not change the AD based on this comment. Suggestion That AD Action Does Not Target the Problem Two commenters suggest that the AD action does not target the problem of why most turbine rotors fail. The commenters state that the proposed AD should be withdrawn. We do not agree. The AD addresses our safety concern that use of the TPE331 engine beyond its original certified intended assumption of one cycle for each flight threatens safe operations. We understand that the AD does not address all causes for turbine VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:23 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 rotor failure. We are investigating other turbine rotor features that may cause failures, and we may consider future AD action. We did not change the AD. Ten Percent Estimate Seems Low One commenter states that the proposed AD estimate of ten percent of affected engines are used on MU–2B airplanes, seems low, and that the special-use industry such as skydiving, agriculture, and some cargo, is a large industry. We do not agree. Ten percent of the affected engines being used on MU–2B airplanes, is our best estimate based on FAA experience with special-use operators and the MU–2 fleet size. Root of the Problem Seems To Be in Manufacturing One commenter states that the root of the problem seems to be in manufacturing. The commenter asks if Honeywell International Inc. will provide a turbine rotor that can withstand low-cycle-fatigue. We do not agree. We investigated the production and manufacturing of the affected turbine rotors and found no anomalies. Therefore, we concluded that the existing turbine rotors were manufactured to type design. However, we may consider future AD action if we find such action necessary. Conclusion We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the comments received, and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting the AD with the changes described previously. We have determined that these changes will neither increase the economic burden on any operator nor increase the scope of the AD. Costs of Compliance We estimate that this AD will affect 200 TPE331 series turboprop, and TSE331–3U model turboshaft engines installed on airplanes and helicopters of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it will take about two work-hours per engine to perform the total equivalent cycles determination and recording. We also estimate that to replace a turbine rotor will take 40 work-hours per engine when done at an unscheduled maintenance interval. We also estimate that 38 rotors will be replaced at unscheduled maintenance intervals. We estimate the average labor rate to be $65 per work-hour. Required parts will cost about $20,000 per engine. The costs associated with this AD are dependent on the engine mission cycle. Operators accruing many minor and major cycles might replace first and second stage PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 turbine rotors every two years. For the purpose of this AD, we estimate the costs for an eight-year period with moderate usage to be 10 minor cycles each flight and 200 flights each year, and the effective use of the first and second turbine rotors to be equivalent to 2,600 cycles. Based on these figures, we estimate the total cost to U.S. operators to be $9,350,630. The Agency is committed to updating the aviation community of expected costs associated with the MU–2B series airplane safety evaluation conducted in 2005. As a result of that commitment, the accumulating expected costs of all ADs related to the MU–2B series airplane safety evaluation may be found at the following Web site: http://www. faa.gov/aircraft/air_cert/ design_approvals/small_airplanes/cos/ mu2_foia_reading_library/. Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ‘‘General requirements.’’Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. Regulatory Findings We have determined that this AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities E:\FR\FM\05JYR1.SGM 05JYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Rules and Regulations under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. We prepared a summary of the costs to comply with this AD and placed it in the AD Docket. You may get a copy of this summary at the address listed under ADDRESSES. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: I Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive: I Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the Federal Aviation Administration amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: I 2006–14–03 Honeywell International Inc. (formerly AlliedSignal Inc., Garrett Engine Division; Garrett Turbine Engine Company; and AiResearch Manufacturing Company of Arizona): Amendment 39–14674. Docket No. FAA–2006–23704; Directorate Identifier 2006–NE–02–AD. Manufacturer 38057 Effective Date (a) This airworthiness directive (AD) becomes effective August 9, 2006. Affected ADs (b) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to Honeywell International Inc. TPE331–1, –1U, –1UA, –2, –2UA, –3U, –3UW, –3W, –5, –5A, –5AB, –5B, –5U, –6, –6A, –6U, –8, –8A, –9, –9U, –10, –10A, –10AV, –10B, –10G, –10GP, –10GR, –10GT, –10J, –10N, –10P, –10R, –10T, –10U, –10UA, –10UF, –10UG, –10UGR, –10UJ, –10UK, –10UR, –11U, –11UA, –12, –12B, –12JR, –12UA, –12UAR, –12UER, and –12UHR series turboprop and TSE331–3U model turboshaft engines. These engines are installed on, but not limited to, the following aircraft: Airplane model Aero Planes, LLC (formerly McKinnon Enterprises) ................................ Allied AG Cat Productions (formerly Schweizer) ..................................... Ayres ......................................................................................................... British Aerospace Ltd (formerly Jetstream) .............................................. Cessna Aircraft Company ........................................................................ Construcciones Aeronauticas, s.a. (CASA) ............................................. DeHavilland .............................................................................................. Dornier ...................................................................................................... Fairchild .................................................................................................... Grumman American ................................................................................. Mitsubishi .................................................................................................. Pilatus ....................................................................................................... Polskie Zaklady Lotnicze Spolka (formerly Wytwornia Sprzetu Komunikacyjnego). Prop-Jets, Inc. .......................................................................................... Raytheon Aircraft (formerly Beech) .......................................................... G–21G. G–164 series. S–2R series. 3201 series, and HP.137 Jetstream MK.1. 441 Conquest. C–212 series. DH104 series 7AXC (Dove). 228 series. SA226 AND SA227 series (Swearingen Merlin and Metro series). G–164 series. MU–2B series (MU–2 series). PC–6 series (Fairchild Porter and Peacemaker). PZL M18, PZL M18A, PZL M18B. Shorts Brothers and Harland, Ltd. ........................................................... Thrush (Rockwell Commander) ................................................................ Twin Commander (Jetprop Commander) ................................................. 400. C45G, TC–45G, C–45H, TC–45H, TC–45J, G18S, E18S–9700, D18S, D18C, H18, RC–45J, JRB–6, UC–45J, 3N, 3NM, 3TM, B100, C90, and E90. SC7 (Skyvan) series. S–2R. 680 and 690 series. Manufacturer Helicopter Model Sikorsky .................................................................................................... Unsafe Condition (d) This AD results from several reports of uncontained turbine rotor separation on engines used in special-use operations. We are issuing this AD to prevent uncontained failure of the turbine rotor due to low-cyclefatigue (LCF), and damage to the aircraft. Compliance (e) You are responsible for having the actions required by this AD performed within S–55 series (Helitec Corp. S55T). the compliance times specified unless the actions have already been done. Turbine Rotors Installed Before the Effective Date of This AD (f) For turbine rotors installed before the effective date of this AD, and currently or previously used in special-use operations: (1) Within 100 major cycles-in-service after the effective date of this AD, or upon removal of the turbine rotor(s) from the engine, whichever occurs first, do the following: (i) Determine the total equivalent cycles accrued for turbine rotors. Use paragraph 2.A. of the Accomplishment Instructions of the applicable Honeywell Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) for your model engines listed in the following Table A, to make the determination. TABLE A.—HONEYWELL ASBS FOR DETERMINING TOTAL EQUIVALENT CYCLES jlentini on PROD1PC65 with RULES For engines Use ASB No. (A) TPE331–1 through ¥6 series and TSE331–3U model. (B) TPE331–8 through –9 series .................................. (C) TPE331–10 through–11 series ............................... (D) TPE331–12 series ................................................... TPE331–A72–2111, dated November 12, 2002 ......... Use ASB Table 1. TPE331–A72–2123, dated February 8, 2006 ............. TPE331–A72–2130, dated September 27, 2005 ........ TPE331–A72–2131, dated September 27, 2005 ........ Use ASB table 1. Use ASB Table 1. Use ASB Table 1. VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:23 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\05JYR1.SGM Turbine rotor removal schedule 05JYR1 38058 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Rules and Regulations (ii) If you are unable to determine equivalent cycles for prior special-use operations due to the absence of actual data regarding the number of takeoffs and landings per major cycle, you must use a onetime ratio of six takeoffs and landings per major cycle to estimate prior special-use equivalent cycles for each turbine rotor. (iii) For each turbine rotor affected on the Life Limited Part Log Card, record the total equivalent cycles accrued, as determined in paragraphs (f)(1)(i) and (f)(1)(ii) of this AD, by complying with the recording requirements for your model engine listed in the following Table B: TABLE B.—SERVICE BULLETINS (SBS) FOR RECORDING TOTAL EQUIVALENT CYCLES For engines Record using (A) TPE331–1 through –6 series and TSE331–3U model ...................... Honeywell SB No. TPE/TSE331–72–0019, Revision 22, dated May 16, 2001. AlliedSignal SB No. TPE331–72–0117, Revision 11, dated November 13, 1997. Honeywell SB No. TPE331–72–0180, Revision 31, dated November 7, 2003. Honeywell SB No. TPE331–72–0476, Revision 27, dated September 17, 2003. (B) TPE331–8 through –9 series ............................................................. (C) TPE331–10 through –11 series ......................................................... (D) TPE331–12 series .............................................................................. (2) Remove from service turbine rotors affected by paragraph (f) of this AD using the applicable Turbine Rotor Removal Schedule in Table A of this AD, or, within nine months after the effective date of this AD, whichever occurs later. Used Turbine Rotors Installed On or After the Effective Date of this AD (g) For used turbine rotors installed on or after the effective date of this AD, and currently or previously used in special-use operations: (1) Before further flight, determine and record total equivalent cycles using paragraphs (f)(1)(i) through (f)(1)(iii) of this AD. (2) Remove from service, turbine rotors affected by paragraph (g) of this AD using the applicable Turbine Rotor Removal Schedule in Table A of this AD. New (Zero Cycles) Turbine Rotors Installed On or After the Effective Date of This AD (h) For all new (zero cycles) turbine rotors installed on or after the effective date of this AD used in special-use operations: (1) Use the new counting method by counting and recording minor and major cycles when accrued, and determine equivalent cycles by the method described in paragraphs (f)(1)(i) and (f)(1)(iii) of this AD. (2) Using the ratio of six takeoffs and landings per major cycle for unknown cycle history, as referenced in paragraph (f)(1)(ii) of this AD, is not permitted. Definitions (i) An engine used in special-use operations is defined as an engine that accrues major and minor cycles and is installed in an aircraft that makes multiple takeoffs and landings without engine shutdown. (j) Total equivalent cycles, is that combination of major and minor cycles as specified in the Honeywell ASBs listed in Table A of this AD. (k) Total equivalent cycle life limits listed in the ASBs, are the cycle life limits specified in the SBs listed in Table B of this AD. (l) The ‘‘recording of total equivalent cycles on the Life Limited Part Log Card’’ is that same procedure specified for ‘‘accumulated cycles’’ or ‘‘total cycles’’ in the SBs listed in Table B of this AD. (m) ‘‘Turbine rotors’’ include first, second, and third stage seal plates, air seals, rotor disks, wheels, and assemblies, and are parts that have part numbers specified in the ASBs listed in Table A of this AD. (n) A major cycle is an engine start, takeoff, landing, and shutdown. (o) A minor cycle, which occurs within a major cycle, is an additional landing with an engine speed reduction to ground idle with no engine shutdown followed by a takeoff. (p) A ‘‘used turbine rotor’’ is a turbine rotor whose cycles-since-new are more than zero. Alternative Methods of Compliance (q) The Manager, Los Angeles Aircraft Certification Office, has the authority to approve alternative methods of compliance for this AD if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. Material Incorporated by Reference (r) You must use the service information specified in Table C of this AD to perform the actions required by this AD. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of the documents listed in Table C of this AD in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Contact Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, Technical Data Distribution, M/S 2101–201, P.O. Box 52170, Phoenix, AZ 85072–2170; telephone: (602) 365–2493 (General Aviation); (602) 365–5535 (Commercial); fax: (602) 365–5577 (General Aviation and Commercial) for a copy of this service information. You may review copies at the FAA, New England Region, Office of the Regional Counsel, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, MA; or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202–741–6030, or go to: http:// www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibrlocations.html. TABLE C.—INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE Service Bulletin (SB) Page Honeywell SB No. TPE/TSE331–72–0019 .................................................................... Total Pages: 16 AlliedSignal SB No. TPE331–72–0117 .......................................................................... Total Pages: 10 jlentini on PROD1PC65 with RULES Honeywell SB No. TPE331–72–0180 ............................................................................ Total Pages: 54 VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:23 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Revision 1 2–11 12 13–16 1 2 3–10 1 2–3 4–5 6–7 8–13 14 15–17 18 19 E:\FR\FM\05JYR1.SGM 22 21 22 21 11 9 11 31 29 31 29 31 27 31 27 31 05JYR1 Date May 16, 2001. March 3, 2000. May 16, 2001. March 3, 2000. November 13, 1997. May 24, 1995. November 13, 1997. November 7, 2003. August 23, 2002. November 7, 2003. August 23, 2002. November 7, 2003. February 23, 2001. November 7, 2003. February 23, 2001. November 7, 2003. 38059 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Rules and Regulations TABLE C.—INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE—Continued Service Bulletin (SB) Page 20 21 22–24 25 26 27–54 1–2 3 4 5 6 7–14 15 16–22 23–27 28–32 33 34 35 36 37–41 42 43 44 45 46 Honeywell SB No. TPE331–72–0476 ............................................................................ Total pages: 46 Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) Honeywell ASB No. Total Pages: 12 Honeywell ASB No. Total Pages: 12 Honeywell ASB No. Total Pages: 16 Honeywell ASB No. Total Pages: 14 Page Revision August 23, 2002. November 7, 2003. August 23, 2002. November 7, 2003. August 23, 2002. November 7, 2003. September 17, 2003. May 24, 2002. September 17, 2003. May 24, 2002. September 17, 2003. May 24, 2002. July 26, 2002. May 24, 2002. September 17, 2003. May 24, 2002. July 26, 2002. May 24, 2002. September 17, 2003. May 24, 2002. September 17, 2003. May 24, 2002. September 17, 2003. May 24, 2002. September 17, 2003. May 24, 2002. Date ALL Original November 12, 2002. TPE331–A72–2123 ........................................................................ ALL Original February 8, 2006. TPE331–A72–2130 ........................................................................ ALL Original September 27, 2005. TPE331–A72–2131 ........................................................................ ALL Original September 27, 2005. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Francis A. Favara, Federal Aviation Administration Manager, Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 06–5929 Filed 7–3–06; 8:45 am] 14 CFR Part 39 BILLING CODE 4910–13–P [Docket No. FAA–2005–22524; Directorate Identifier 2005–NM–135–AD; Amendment 39–14672; AD 2006–14–01] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A330–200, A330–300, A340–200, and A340–300 Series Airplanes, and Model A340–541 and A340–642 Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: jlentini on PROD1PC65 with RULES 29 31 29 31 29 31 27 25 27 25 27 25 26 25 27 25 26 25 27 25 27 25 27 25 27 25 Date TPE331–A72–2111 ........................................................................ Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on June 26, 2006. SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330–200, A330–300, A340–200, and A340–300 series airplanes, and Model A340–541 and A340–642 airplanes. This AD requires VerDate Aug<31>2005 Revision 19:32 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 inspecting to determine if certain emergency escape slides/slide rafts (referred to as slide/rafts) are installed in certain crew/passenger doors; and, if so, performing a one-time inspection to determine if the electrical harnesses of the slide/rafts are properly routed, and rerouting the harnesses if necessary. This AD results from report that a slide/ raft failed to deploy properly during a deployment test. We are issuing this AD to detect and correct improper routing of the electrical harnesses of certain slide/rafts, which could prevent proper deployment of the slide/rafts and delay evacuation of passengers and flightcrew during an emergency. DATES: This AD becomes effective August 9, 2006. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the AD as of August 9, 2006. ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// dms.dot.gov or in person at the Docket E:\FR\FM\05JYR1.SGM 05JYR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 128 (Wednesday, July 5, 2006)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 38054-38059]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 06-5929]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2006-23704; Directorate Identifier 2006-NE-02-AD; 
Amendment 39-14674; AD 2006-14-03]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Honeywell International Inc. TPE331 
Series Turboprop, and TSE331-3U Model Turboshaft Engines

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of 
Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 38055]]

SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for 
certain Honeywell International Inc. TPE331 series turboprop, and 
TSE331-3U model turboshaft engines. This AD requires implementing a new 
flight cycle counting method for first, second, and third-stage turbine 
rotors used in aircraft that make multiple takeoffs and landings 
without an engine shutdown, and removing turbine rotors from service 
that have reached or exceeded their cycle life limits. This new flight 
cycle counting method requires determining total equivalent cycles 
accrued. This AD results from several reports of uncontained turbine 
rotor separation on engines used in special-use operations. We are 
issuing this AD to prevent uncontained failure of the turbine rotor due 
to low-cycle-fatigue (LCF), and damage to the aircraft.

DATES: This AD becomes effective August 9, 2006. The Director of the 
Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain 
publications listed in the regulations as of August 9, 2006.

ADDRESSES: You can get the service information identified in this AD 
from Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, Technical Data 
Distribution, M/S 2101-201, P.O. Box 52170, Phoenix, AZ 85072-2170; 
telephone: (602) 365-2493 (General Aviation); (602) 365-5535 
(Commercial); fax: (602) 365-5577 (General Aviation and Commercial).
    You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://dms.dot.gov 
or in Room PL-401 on the plaza level of the Nassif Building, 400 
Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joseph Costa, Aerospace Engineer, Los 
Angeles Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Transport Airplane 
Directorate, 3960 Paramount Blvd., Lakewood, CA 90712-4137; telephone 
(562) 627-5246; fax (562) 627-5210.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA proposed to amend 14 CFR part 39 
with a proposed AD. The proposed AD applies to certain Honeywell 
International Inc. TPE331 series turboprop, and TSE331-3U model 
turboshaft engines. We published the proposed AD in the Federal 
Register on February 23, 2006 (71 FR 9281). That action proposed to 
require implementing a new flight cycle counting method for first, 
second, and third-stage turbine rotors used in aircraft that make 
multiple takeoffs and landings without an engine shutdown, and removing 
turbine rotors from service that have reached or exceeded their cycle 
life limits. This new flight cycle counting method requires determining 
total equivalent cycles accrued.

Examining the AD Docket

    You may examine the docket that contains the AD, any comments 
received, and any final disposition in person at the Docket Management 
Facility Docket Office between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, except Federal holidays. The Docket Office (telephone (800) 
647-5227) is located on the plaza level of the Department of 
Transportation Nassif Building at the street address stated in 
ADDRESSES. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after 
the DMS receives them.

Comments

    We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the 
development of this AD. We have considered the comments received.

Suggestion To Delete Phrase ``To Ground Idle''

    One commenter suggests that in the Discussion paragraph of the 
proposed AD, we delete the phrase ``to ground idle''. Doing this would 
reconcile the Discussion paragraph with the Definition paragraph (i) in 
the compliance section, because touch-and-go maneuvers require the 
logging of partial cycles. A touch-and-go maneuver is a landing and 
takeoff without shutdown.
    We partially agree. The damage fraction for a minor cycle 
identified in the Honeywell Alert Service Bulletins is based on 
landings to normal ground-idle engine speed reductions without an 
engine shutdown. Any engine operation, such as a touch-and-go maneuver 
with an engine speed reduction to ground idle during touch-down, counts 
as a minor cycle. Engine speed reductions to ground idle during landing 
are an important factor in determining the counting of a minor cycle 
and, therefore, must be included in the definition. The AD does not 
repeat the proposed AD Discussion paragraph. We agree that the wording 
in our NPRM could be clearer. Therefore, we changed Definition 
paragraph (i), to include major and minor cycles, and paragraph (o), to 
state that a minor cycle, which occurs within a major cycle, is an 
additional landing with an engine speed reduction to ground idle with 
no engine shutdown, followed by a takeoff.

Request To Change Compliance Section Paragraph (f)(1)(ii)

    One commenter requests that we change compliance section paragraph 
(f)(1)(ii) from ``If you are unable to determine equivalent cycles for 
prior special-use operations, you must use a onetime takeoff-to-engine 
shutdown ratio of six to estimate prior special-use equivalent cycles 
for each turbine rotor'' to ``For turbine rotors known to have prior 
special use operation, if you are unable to determine equivalent cycles 
for prior special-use operations, you must use a onetime takeoff-to-
engine shutdown ratio of six to estimate prior special-use equivalent 
cycles for each turbine rotor.'' The commenter feels that this would 
clarify the phrase ``unable to determine'' because as-written it could 
be construed to mean that a rotor had special use operation, but exact 
minor-to-major cycle count cannot be determined.
    We partially agree. We agree with the commenter's application of 
the phrase ``unable to determine'' but we do not agree that paragraph 
(f)(1)(ii) should be changed. That paragraph must be read in context 
with paragraph (f), which clearly states ``For turbine rotors installed 
before the effective date of this AD, and currently or previously used 
in special-use operations:'' However, we did clarify paragraph 
(f)(1)(ii) to add the reason why the operator or owner would be unable 
to determine equivalent cycles.

Request To Change the Phrase ``Used Turbine Rotors'' in Compliance 
Paragraph (f)

    One commenter requests that we change the phrase ``used turbine 
rotors'' in compliance paragraph (f) to ``turbine rotors'' as these 
rotors may have had zero cycles-since-new at installation. We agree. 
The compliance action is the same for new or used turbine rotors 
installed before the effective date of the AD. We made that change in 
the AD.

Request To Add a Step to Compliance Paragraphs (f) and (g)

    One commenter requests that we add a step to compliance paragraphs 
(f) and (g) to include the new counting method, which is also 
referenced in paragraph (h)(1) of the compliance section. The commenter 
states that this counting method should be used after determining 
equivalent cycles, whether the turbine rotor is new or used.
    We partially agree. We agree that operators and maintenance 
personnel use the new counting method of counting major and minor 
cycles when accrued for new and used turbine rotors after the initial 
assessment from the Table 1 turbine removal schedules in the Honeywell 
ASBs. This schedule requires retiring the turbine rotors within a 
specified number of equivalent

[[Page 38056]]

cycles, which infers that the owner or operator use the new counting 
method with minor and major cycles. We changed compliance section 
paragraph (f)(1)(ii) to read ``If you are unable to determine 
equivalent cycles for prior special-use operations due to the absence 
of actual data regarding the number of takeoffs and landings per major 
cycle, you must use a onetime ratio of six takeoffs and landings per 
major cycle to estimate prior special-use equivalent cycles for each 
turbine rotor''. Also, for clarification, we changed compliance section 
paragraph (h)(1) to read ``Use the new counting method by counting and 
recording minor and major cycles when accrued, and determine equivalent 
cycles by the method described in paragraph (f)(1)(i) and (f)(1)(iii) 
of this AD''.
    In preparing the response to this commenter, we decided that 
proposed paragraphs (h) and (h)(2) could be clearer. Therefore, we 
changed compliance section paragraph (h) to read ``For all new (zero 
cycles) turbine rotors installed on or after the effective date of this 
AD used in special-use operations:'' and paragraph (h)(2) to read 
``Using the ratio of six takeoffs and landings per major cycle for 
unknown cycle history, as referenced in paragraph (f)(1)(ii) of this 
AD, is not permitted''.

Comment That Previous Method of Counting Cycles Is Acceptable

    One commenter states that the previous method of counting cycles is 
acceptable and that major and minor counting is unnecessary. The 
commenter cites their ``lower than red-line'' engine operation 
temperatures are an additional safety margin (excluding temperatures 
during startups and shutdowns).
    We do not agree. The new counting method is necessary to preclude 
fatigue damage of turbine rotors and is appropriate for most operations 
when considering engine operation temperatures and rotor speeds. We did 
not change the AD based on this comment.

Suggestion That AD Action Does Not Target the Problem

    Two commenters suggest that the AD action does not target the 
problem of why most turbine rotors fail. The commenters state that the 
proposed AD should be withdrawn.
    We do not agree. The AD addresses our safety concern that use of 
the TPE331 engine beyond its original certified intended assumption of 
one cycle for each flight threatens safe operations. We understand that 
the AD does not address all causes for turbine rotor failure. We are 
investigating other turbine rotor features that may cause failures, and 
we may consider future AD action. We did not change the AD.

Ten Percent Estimate Seems Low

    One commenter states that the proposed AD estimate of ten percent 
of affected engines are used on MU-2B airplanes, seems low, and that 
the special-use industry such as skydiving, agriculture, and some 
cargo, is a large industry.
    We do not agree. Ten percent of the affected engines being used on 
MU-2B airplanes, is our best estimate based on FAA experience with 
special-use operators and the MU-2 fleet size.

Root of the Problem Seems To Be in Manufacturing

    One commenter states that the root of the problem seems to be in 
manufacturing. The commenter asks if Honeywell International Inc. will 
provide a turbine rotor that can withstand low-cycle-fatigue.
    We do not agree. We investigated the production and manufacturing 
of the affected turbine rotors and found no anomalies. Therefore, we 
concluded that the existing turbine rotors were manufactured to type 
design. However, we may consider future AD action if we find such 
action necessary.

Conclusion

    We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the 
comments received, and determined that air safety and the public 
interest require adopting the AD with the changes described previously. 
We have determined that these changes will neither increase the 
economic burden on any operator nor increase the scope of the AD.

Costs of Compliance

    We estimate that this AD will affect 200 TPE331 series turboprop, 
and TSE331-3U model turboshaft engines installed on airplanes and 
helicopters of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it will take about 
two work-hours per engine to perform the total equivalent cycles 
determination and recording. We also estimate that to replace a turbine 
rotor will take 40 work-hours per engine when done at an unscheduled 
maintenance interval. We also estimate that 38 rotors will be replaced 
at unscheduled maintenance intervals. We estimate the average labor 
rate to be $65 per work-hour. Required parts will cost about $20,000 
per engine. The costs associated with this AD are dependent on the 
engine mission cycle. Operators accruing many minor and major cycles 
might replace first and second stage turbine rotors every two years. 
For the purpose of this AD, we estimate the costs for an eight-year 
period with moderate usage to be 10 minor cycles each flight and 200 
flights each year, and the effective use of the first and second 
turbine rotors to be equivalent to 2,600 cycles. Based on these 
figures, we estimate the total cost to U.S. operators to be $9,350,630.
    The Agency is committed to updating the aviation community of 
expected costs associated with the MU-2B series airplane safety 
evaluation conducted in 2005. As a result of that commitment, the 
accumulating expected costs of all ADs related to the MU-2B series 
airplane safety evaluation may be found at the following Web site: 
http://www.faa.gov/aircraft/air_cert/design_approvals/small_
airplanes/cos/mu2_foia_reading_library/.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ``General 
requirements.''Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with 
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing 
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator 
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within 
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition 
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this 
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    We have determined that this AD will not have federalism 
implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a 
substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between 
the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
    (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive 
Order 12866;
    (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and 
Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and
    (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities

[[Page 38057]]

under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
    We prepared a summary of the costs to comply with this AD and 
placed it in the AD Docket. You may get a copy of this summary at the 
address listed under ADDRESSES.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

0
Adoption of the Amendment
    Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the 
Administrator, the Federal Aviation Administration amends 14 CFR part 
39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.

Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness 
directive:

2006-14-03 Honeywell International Inc. (formerly AlliedSignal Inc., 
Garrett Engine Division; Garrett Turbine Engine Company; and 
AiResearch Manufacturing Company of Arizona): Amendment 39-14674. 
Docket No. FAA-2006-23704; Directorate Identifier 2006-NE-02-AD.

Effective Date

    (a) This airworthiness directive (AD) becomes effective August 
9, 2006.

Affected ADs

    (b) None.

Applicability

    (c) This AD applies to Honeywell International Inc. TPE331-1, -
1U, -1UA, -2, -2UA, -3U, -3UW, -3W, -5, -5A, -5AB, -5B, -5U, -6, -
6A, -6U, -8, -8A, -9, -9U, -10, -10A, -10AV, -10B, -10G, -10GP, -
10GR, -10GT, -10J, -10N, -10P, -10R, -10T, -10U, -10UA, -10UF, -
10UG, -10UGR, -10UJ, -10UK, -10UR, -11U, -11UA, -12, -12B, -12JR, -
12UA, -12UAR, -12UER, and -12UHR series turboprop and TSE331-3U 
model turboshaft engines. These engines are installed on, but not 
limited to, the following aircraft:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Manufacturer                        Airplane model
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aero Planes, LLC (formerly McKinnon      G-21G.
 Enterprises).
Allied AG Cat Productions (formerly      G-164 series.
 Schweizer).
Ayres..................................  S-2R series.
British Aerospace Ltd (formerly          3201 series, and HP.137
 Jetstream).                              Jetstream MK.1.
Cessna Aircraft Company................  441 Conquest.
Construcciones Aeronauticas, s.a.        C-212 series.
 (CASA).
DeHavilland............................  DH104 series 7AXC (Dove).
Dornier................................  228 series.
Fairchild..............................  SA226 AND SA227 series
                                          (Swearingen Merlin and Metro
                                          series).
Grumman American.......................  G-164 series.
Mitsubishi.............................  MU-2B series (MU-2 series).
Pilatus................................  PC-6 series (Fairchild Porter
                                          and Peacemaker).
Polskie Zaklady Lotnicze Spolka          PZL M18, PZL M18A, PZL M18B.
 (formerly Wytwornia Sprzetu
 Komunikacyjnego).
Prop-Jets, Inc.........................  400.
Raytheon Aircraft (formerly Beech).....  C45G, TC-45G, C-45H, TC-45H, TC-
                                          45J, G18S, E18S-9700, D18S,
                                          D18C, H18, RC-45J, JRB-6, UC-
                                          45J, 3N, 3NM, 3TM, B100, C90,
                                          and E90.
Shorts Brothers and Harland, Ltd.......  SC7 (Skyvan) series.
Thrush (Rockwell Commander)............  S-2R.
Twin Commander (Jetprop Commander).....  680 and 690 series.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Manufacturer                       Helicopter Model
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sikorsky...............................  S-55 series (Helitec Corp.
                                          S55T).
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Unsafe Condition

    (d) This AD results from several reports of uncontained turbine 
rotor separation on engines used in special-use operations. We are 
issuing this AD to prevent uncontained failure of the turbine rotor 
due to low-cycle-fatigue (LCF), and damage to the aircraft.

Compliance

    (e) You are responsible for having the actions required by this 
AD performed within the compliance times specified unless the 
actions have already been done.

Turbine Rotors Installed Before the Effective Date of This AD

    (f) For turbine rotors installed before the effective date of 
this AD, and currently or previously used in special-use operations:
    (1) Within 100 major cycles-in-service after the effective date 
of this AD, or upon removal of the turbine rotor(s) from the engine, 
whichever occurs first, do the following:
    (i) Determine the total equivalent cycles accrued for turbine 
rotors. Use paragraph 2.A. of the Accomplishment Instructions of the 
applicable Honeywell Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) for your model 
engines listed in the following Table A, to make the determination.

    Table A.--Honeywell ASBs for Determining Total Equivalent Cycles
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Turbine rotor
          For engines                 Use ASB No.       removal schedule
------------------------------------------------------------------------
(A) TPE331-1 through -6 series  TPE331-A72-2111, dated  Use ASB Table 1.
 and TSE331-3U model.            November 12, 2002.
(B) TPE331-8 through -9 series  TPE331-A72-2123, dated  Use ASB table 1.
                                 February 8, 2006.
(C) TPE331-10 through-11        TPE331-A72-2130, dated  Use ASB Table 1.
 series.                         September 27, 2005.
(D) TPE331-12 series..........  TPE331-A72-2131, dated  Use ASB Table 1.
                                 September 27, 2005.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


[[Page 38058]]

    (ii) If you are unable to determine equivalent cycles for prior 
special-use operations due to the absence of actual data regarding 
the number of takeoffs and landings per major cycle, you must use a 
onetime ratio of six takeoffs and landings per major cycle to 
estimate prior special-use equivalent cycles for each turbine rotor.
    (iii) For each turbine rotor affected on the Life Limited Part 
Log Card, record the total equivalent cycles accrued, as determined 
in paragraphs (f)(1)(i) and (f)(1)(ii) of this AD, by complying with 
the recording requirements for your model engine listed in the 
following Table B:

 Table B.--Service Bulletins (SBs) for Recording Total Equivalent Cycles
------------------------------------------------------------------------
              For engines                          Record using
------------------------------------------------------------------------
(A) TPE331-1 through -6 series and       Honeywell SB No. TPE/TSE331-72-
 TSE331-3U model.                         0019, Revision 22, dated May
                                          16, 2001.
(B) TPE331-8 through -9 series.........  AlliedSignal SB No. TPE331-72-
                                          0117, Revision 11, dated
                                          November 13, 1997.
(C) TPE331-10 through -11 series.......  Honeywell SB No. TPE331-72-
                                          0180, Revision 31, dated
                                          November 7, 2003.
(D) TPE331-12 series...................  Honeywell SB No. TPE331-72-
                                          0476, Revision 27, dated
                                          September 17, 2003.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (2) Remove from service turbine rotors affected by paragraph (f) 
of this AD using the applicable Turbine Rotor Removal Schedule in 
Table A of this AD, or, within nine months after the effective date 
of this AD, whichever occurs later.

Used Turbine Rotors Installed On or After the Effective Date of this AD

    (g) For used turbine rotors installed on or after the effective 
date of this AD, and currently or previously used in special-use 
operations:
    (1) Before further flight, determine and record total equivalent 
cycles using paragraphs (f)(1)(i) through (f)(1)(iii) of this AD.
    (2) Remove from service, turbine rotors affected by paragraph 
(g) of this AD using the applicable Turbine Rotor Removal Schedule 
in Table A of this AD.

New (Zero Cycles) Turbine Rotors Installed On or After the Effective 
Date of This AD

    (h) For all new (zero cycles) turbine rotors installed on or 
after the effective date of this AD used in special-use operations:
    (1) Use the new counting method by counting and recording minor 
and major cycles when accrued, and determine equivalent cycles by 
the method described in paragraphs (f)(1)(i) and (f)(1)(iii) of this 
AD.
    (2) Using the ratio of six takeoffs and landings per major cycle 
for unknown cycle history, as referenced in paragraph (f)(1)(ii) of 
this AD, is not permitted.

Definitions

    (i) An engine used in special-use operations is defined as an 
engine that accrues major and minor cycles and is installed in an 
aircraft that makes multiple takeoffs and landings without engine 
shutdown.
    (j) Total equivalent cycles, is that combination of major and 
minor cycles as specified in the Honeywell ASBs listed in Table A of 
this AD.
    (k) Total equivalent cycle life limits listed in the ASBs, are 
the cycle life limits specified in the SBs listed in Table B of this 
AD.
    (l) The ``recording of total equivalent cycles on the Life 
Limited Part Log Card'' is that same procedure specified for 
``accumulated cycles'' or ``total cycles'' in the SBs listed in 
Table B of this AD.
    (m) ``Turbine rotors'' include first, second, and third stage 
seal plates, air seals, rotor disks, wheels, and assemblies, and are 
parts that have part numbers specified in the ASBs listed in Table A 
of this AD.
    (n) A major cycle is an engine start, takeoff, landing, and 
shutdown.
    (o) A minor cycle, which occurs within a major cycle, is an 
additional landing with an engine speed reduction to ground idle 
with no engine shutdown followed by a takeoff.
    (p) A ``used turbine rotor'' is a turbine rotor whose cycles-
since-new are more than zero.

Alternative Methods of Compliance

    (q) The Manager, Los Angeles Aircraft Certification Office, has 
the authority to approve alternative methods of compliance for this 
AD if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19.

Material Incorporated by Reference

    (r) You must use the service information specified in Table C of 
this AD to perform the actions required by this AD. The Director of 
the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of the 
documents listed in Table C of this AD in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 
552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Contact Honeywell Engines, Systems & 
Services, Technical Data Distribution, M/S 2101-201, P.O. Box 52170, 
Phoenix, AZ 85072-2170; telephone: (602) 365-2493 (General 
Aviation); (602) 365-5535 (Commercial); fax: (602) 365-5577 (General 
Aviation and Commercial) for a copy of this service information. You 
may review copies at the FAA, New England Region, Office of the 
Regional Counsel, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, MA; or 
at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For 
information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-
741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/
ibr-locations.html.

                                      Table C.--Incorporation by Reference
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
           Service Bulletin (SB)                Page       Revision                      Date
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Honeywell SB No. TPE/TSE331-72-0019...            1           22  May 16, 2001.
    Total Pages: 16                                2-11           21  March 3, 2000.
                                                     12           22  May 16, 2001.
                                                  13-16           21  March 3, 2000.
    AlliedSignal SB No. TPE331-72-0117....            1           11  November 13, 1997.
    Total Pages: 10                                   2            9  May 24, 1995.
                                                   3-10           11  November 13, 1997.
    Honeywell SB No. TPE331-72-0180.......            1           31  November 7, 2003.
    Total Pages: 54                                 2-3           29  August 23, 2002.
                                                    4-5           31  November 7, 2003.
                                                    6-7           29  August 23, 2002.
                                                   8-13           31   November 7, 2003.
                                                     14           27  February 23, 2001.
                                                  15-17           31  November 7, 2003.
                                                     18           27  February 23, 2001.
                                                     19           31  November 7, 2003.

[[Page 38059]]

 
                                                     20           29  August 23, 2002.
                                                     21           31  November 7, 2003.
                                                  22-24           29  August 23, 2002.
                                                     25           31  November 7, 2003.
                                                     26           29  August 23, 2002.
                                                  27-54           31  November 7, 2003.
    Honeywell SB No. TPE331-72-0476.......          1-2           27  September 17, 2003.
    Total pages: 46                                   3           25  May 24, 2002.
                                                      4           27  September 17, 2003.
                                                      5           25  May 24, 2002.
                                                      6           27  September 17, 2003.
                                                   7-14           25  May 24, 2002.
                                                     15           26  July 26, 2002.
                                                  16-22           25  May 24, 2002.
                                                  23-27           27  September 17, 2003.
                                                  28-32           25  May 24, 2002.
                                                     33           26  July 26, 2002.
                                                     34           25  May 24, 2002.
                                                     35           27  September 17, 2003.
                                                     36           25  May 24, 2002.
                                                  37-41           27  September 17, 2003.
                                                     42           25  May 24, 2002.
                                                     43           27  September 17, 2003.
                                                     44           25  May 24, 2002.
                                                     45           27  September 17, 2003.
                                                     46           25  May 24, 2002.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
       Alert Service Bulletin (ASB)             Page       Revision                      Date
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Honeywell ASB No. TPE331-A72-2111.....          ALL     Original  November 12, 2002.
    Total Pages: 12
    Honeywell ASB No. TPE331-A72-2123.....          ALL     Original  February 8, 2006.
    Total Pages: 12
    Honeywell ASB No. TPE331-A72-2130.....          ALL     Original  September 27, 2005.
    Total Pages: 16
    Honeywell ASB No. TPE331-A72-2131.....          ALL     Original  September 27, 2005.
    Total Pages: 14
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on June 26, 2006.
Francis A. Favara,
Manager, Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification 
Service.
[FR Doc. 06-5929 Filed 7-3-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P