Marketing Order Regulating the Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced in the Far West; Revision of the Salable Quantity and Allotment Percentage for Class 3 (Native) Spearmint Oil for the 2006-2007 Marketing Year, 30266-30270 [E6-8105]

Download as PDF 30266 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 102 / Friday, May 26, 2006 / Rules and Regulations provisions of this part except as provided explicitly in this section, assistance may be made available under this section for the eligible cost of refurbishing public or private oyster reefs damaged in calendar year 2005 by a 2005 hurricane. Oyster bed refurbishing consists of removing mud from public and private oyster beds, staking out the leased areas, reestablishing the oyster beds using crushed limestone, recycled oyster shells, or other available and suitable approved cultch materials, reseeding the oyster beds, and related actions approved by FSA. (b) Notwithstanding § 701.26, an ECP participant shall not receive more than 90 percent of the participant’s actual cost or of the total allowable cost described in paragraph (a) of this section. (c) The provisions of § 701.26(c) limiting ECP payments to 50 percent of the agricultural value of the land do not apply to oyster bed rehabilitation and refurbishing. § 701.55 Nursery. (a) Subject to the other eligibility provisions of this part except as provided explicitly in this section, assistance may be made available in an eligible county under this section for the cost of removing nursery debris such as nursery structures, shade houses, and above ground irrigation facilities, where such debris was created in calendar year 2005 by a 2005 hurricane. (b) Notwithstanding § 701.26, an otherwise eligible ECP participant may be allowed up to 90 percent of the participant’s actual cost or of the total allowable cost for losses described in paragraph (a) of this section. cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with RULES § 701.56 Poultry. (a) Subject to the other eligibility provisions of this part except as provided explicitly in this section, assistance may be allowed under this section for uninsured losses in calendar year 2005 to a poultry house in an eligible county due to a 2005 hurricane. (b) Claimants under this section may be allowed an amount up to the lesser of: (1) The lesser of 50 percent of the participant’s actual or the total allowable cost of the reconstruction or repair of a poultry house, or (2) $50,000 per poultry house. (c) The total amount of assistance provided under this section and any indemnities for losses to a poultry house paid to a poultry grower, may not exceed 90 percent of the total costs associated with the reconstruction or repair of a poultry house. VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:42 May 25, 2006 Jkt 208001 (d) Poultry growers must provide information on insurance payments on their poultry houses. Copies of contracts between growers and poultry integrators may be required. (e) Assistance under this section is limited to amounts necessary for reconstruction and/or repair of a poultry house to the same size as before the hurricane. (f) Assistance is limited to poultry houses used to house poultry for commercial enterprises. A commercial poultry enterprise is one with a dedicated structure for poultry and a number of poultry that exceeds actual non-commercial uses of poultry and their products at all times, and from which poultry or related products are actually, and routinely, sold in commercial quantities for food, fiber, or eggs. Unless otherwise approved by FSA, a commercial quantity is a quantity per week that would normally exceed $100 in sales. (g) Poultry houses with respect to which claims are made under this section must be reconstructed or repaired to meet current building standards. § 701.57 Private non-industrial forest land. (a) Subject to the other eligibility provisions of this part except as provided explicitly in this section, assistance made available under this section with respect to private, nonindustrial forest land in an eligible county for costs related to reforestations, rehabilitation, and related measures undertaken because of losses in calendar year 2005 caused by a 2005 hurricane. To be eligible, a nonindustrial private forest landowner must have suffered a loss of, or damage to, at least 35 percent of forest acres on commercial forest land of the forest landowner in a designated disaster county due to a 2005 hurricane or related condition. The 35 percent loss shall be determined based on the value of the land before and after the hurricane event. (b) During the 5-year period beginning on the date of the loss, the eligible private non-industrial forest landowner must: (1) Reforest the eligible damaged forest acres in accordance with a forest management plan approved by FSA that is appropriate for the forest type where the forest management plan is developed by a person with appropriate forestry credentials, as determined by the Deputy Administrator; (2) Use the best management practices included in the forest management plan; and PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 (3) Exercise good stewardship on the forest land of the landowner while maintaining the land in a forested state. (c) Notwithstanding § 701.26, an ECP participant shall not receive under this section more than 75 percent of the participant’s actual cost or of the total allowable cost of reforestation, rehabilitation, and related measures. (d) Payments under this section shall not exceed a maximum of $150 per acre for any acre. (e) Requests will be prioritized based upon planting tree species best suited to the site as stated in the forest management plan. Signed at Washington, DC, on May 19, 2006. Glen L. Keppy, Acting Administrator, Farm Service Agency. [FR Doc. E6–8100 Filed 5–25–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–05–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 985 [Docket No. FV06–985–2 IFR] Marketing Order Regulating the Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced in the Far West; Revision of the Salable Quantity and Allotment Percentage for Class 3 (Native) Spearmint Oil for the 2006–2007 Marketing Year Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim final rule with request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This rule revises the quantity of Class 3 (Native) spearmint oil that handlers may purchase from, or handle for, producers during the 2006–2007 marketing year. This rule increases the Native spearmint oil salable quantity from 1,007,886 pounds to 1,161,260 pounds, and the allotment percentage from 46 percent to 53 percent. The marketing order regulates the handling of spearmint oil produced in the Far West and is administered locally by the Spearmint Oil Administrative Committee (Committee). The Committee recommended this rule for the purpose of avoiding extreme fluctuations in supplies and prices and to help maintain stability in the Far West spearmint oil market. DATES: Effective June 1, 2006, through May 31, 2007; comments received by July 25, 2006 will be considered prior to issuance of a final rule. ADDRESSES: Interested persons are invited to submit written comments E:\FR\FM\26MYR1.SGM 26MYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 102 / Friday, May 26, 2006 / Rules and Regulations concerning this rule. Comments must be sent to the Docket Clerk, Marketing Order Administration Branch, Fruit and Vegetable Programs, AMS, USDA, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., STOP 0237, Washington, DC 20250–0237; Fax: (202) 720–8938; E-mail: moab.docketclerk@usda.gov; or Internet: http://www.regulations.gov. All comments should reference the docket number and the date and page number of this issue of the Federal Register and will be made available for public inspection in the Office of the Docket Clerk during regular business hours, or can be viewed at: http:// www.ams.usda.gov/fv/moab.html. FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan M. Hiller, Northwest Marketing Field Office, Marketing Order Administration Branch, Fruit and Vegetable Programs, AMS, USDA; Telephone: (503) 326– 2724, Fax: (503) 326–7440. Small businesses may request information on complying with this regulation by contacting Jay Guerber, Marketing Order Administration Branch, Fruit and Vegetable Programs, AMS, USDA, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., STOP 0237, Washington, DC 20250–0237; Telephone: (202) 720– 2491, Fax: (202) 720–8938, or E-mail: Jay.Guerber@usda.gov. This rule is issued under Marketing Order No. 985 (7 CFR part 985), as amended, regulating the handling of spearmint oil produced in the Far West (Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and designated parts of Nevada and Utah), hereinafter referred to as the ‘‘order.’’ The order is effective under the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601–674), hereinafter referred to as the ‘‘Act.’’ The Department of Agriculture (USDA) is issuing this rule in conformance with Executive Order 12866. This rule has been reviewed under Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform. Under the provisions of the marketing order now in effect, salable quantities and allotment percentages may be established for classes of spearmint oil produced in the Far West. This rule increases the quantity of Native spearmint oil produced in the Far West that may be purchased from or handled for producers by handlers during the 2006–2007 marketing year, which ends on May 31, 2007. This rule will not preempt any State or local laws, regulations, or policies, unless they present an irreconcilable conflict with this rule. The Act provides that administrative proceedings must be exhausted before cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with RULES SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:42 May 25, 2006 Jkt 208001 parties may file suit in court. Under section 608c(15)(A) of the Act, any handler subject to an order may file with USDA a petition stating that the order, any provision of the order, or any obligation imposed in connection with the order is not in accordance with law and request a modification of the order or to be exempted therefrom. A handler is afforded the opportunity for a hearing on the petition. After the hearing USDA would rule on the petition. The Act provides that the district court of the United States in any district in which the handler is an inhabitant, or has his or her principal place of business, has jurisdiction to review USDA’s ruling on the petition, provided an action is filed not later than 20 days after the date of the entry of the ruling. The original salable quantity and allotment percentages for Scotch and Native spearmint oil for the 2006–2007 marketing year were recommended by the Committee at its October 5, 2005, meeting. The Committee recommended salable quantities of 878,205 pounds and 1,007,886 pounds, and allotment percentages of 45 percent and 46 percent, respectively, for Scotch and Native spearmint oil. A proposed rule was published in the Federal Register on February 1, 2006 (71 FR 5183). Comments on the proposed rule were solicited from interested persons until March 3, 2006. No comments were received. Subsequently, a final rule establishing the salable quantities and allotment percentages for Scotch and Native spearmint oil for the 2006–2007 marketing year was published in the Federal Register on April 5, 2006 (71 FR 16986). This rule revises the quantity of Native spearmint oil that handlers may purchase from, or handle for, producers during the 2006–2007 marketing year, which ends on May 31, 2007. Pursuant to authority contained in §§ 985.50, 985.51, and 985.52 of the order, the Committee, with seven of the eight members present, met on April 18, 2006, and unanimously recommended that the 2006–2007 Native spearmint oil allotment percentage be increased by 7 percent. Thus, taking into consideration the following discussion on adjustments to the Native spearmint oil salable quantity, this rule increases the 2006– 2007 marketing year salable quantity and allotment percentage for Native spearmint oil to 1,161,260 pounds and 53 percent, respectively. The salable quantity is the total quantity of each class of oil that handlers may purchase from, or handle for, producers during the marketing year. The total salable quantity is PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 30267 divided by the total industry allotment base to determine an allotment percentage. Each producer is allotted a share of the salable quantity by applying the allotment percentage to the producer’s individual allotment base for the applicable class of spearmint oil. The estimated total industry allotment base for Native spearmint oil for the 2006–2007 marketing year was established at 2,191,056 pounds. This figure represents a one percent increase over the revised 2005–2006 total allotment base. This figure is generally revised each year on June 1 due to producer base being lost due to the bona fide effort production provisions of § 985.53(e). The revision is usually minimal. By increasing the salable quantity and allotment percentage, this rule makes an additional amount of Native spearmint oil available by releasing oil from the reserve pool. When applied to each individual producer, the allotment percentage increase allows each producer to take up to an amount equal to their allotment base from their reserve for this respective class of oil. Before November 1, 2006, a producer may also transfer excess oil to another producer to enable that producer to fill a deficiency in that producer’s annual allotment for this class of oil. The following table summarizes the Committee recommendation: Native Spearmint Oil Recommendation (A) Estimated 2006–2007 Allotment Base—2,191,056 pounds. This is the estimate on which the original 2006– 2007 Native spearmint oil salable quantity and allotment percentage was based. (B) Original 2006–2007 Allotment Percentage—46 percent. This was unanimously recommended by the Committee on October 5, 2005. (C) Original 2006–2007 Salable Quantity—1,007,886 pounds. This figure is 46 percent of the estimated 2006–2007 allotment base of 2,191,056 pounds. (D) Increase in Allotment Percentage—7 percent. The Committee recommended a 7 percent increase at its April 18, 2006, meeting. (E) 2006–2007 Allotment Percentage—53 percent. This figure is derived by adding the increase of 7 percent to the original 2006–2007 allotment percentage of 46 percent. (F) Calculated Revised 2006–2007 Salable Quantity—1,161,260 pounds. This figure is 53 percent of the estimated 2006–2007 allotment base of 2,191,056 pounds. (G) Computed Increase in the 2006– 2007 Salable Quantity—153,374 E:\FR\FM\26MYR1.SGM 26MYR1 cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with RULES 30268 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 102 / Friday, May 26, 2006 / Rules and Regulations pounds. This figure is 7 percent of the estimated 2006–2007 allotment base of 2,191,056 pounds. In making this recommendation, the Committee considered all available information on price, supply, and demand. The Committee also considered reports and other information from handlers and producers in attendance at the meeting and reports given by the Committee manager from handlers and producers who were not in attendance. On average, handlers estimated that the demand for 2006–2007 spearmint oil is 300,000 pounds above the quantity already contracted for sale. The 2006–2007 marketing year will begin on June 1, 2006, with an estimated carry-in of 50,000 pounds of salable oil. When the estimated carry-in is added to the original 2006–2007 salable quantity of 1,007,886 pounds, a total estimated available supply for the 2006–2007 marketing year of 1,057,886 pounds results. Of this amount, 819,560 pounds of oil has already been contracted for the 2006–2007 marketing year. Additionally, an estimated deficiency of 133,800 pounds may exist from producers not producing their full salable quantity. As a result, an estimated 104,526 pounds of oil would remain uncontracted and available for sale without this increase. This increase will supply an additional 153,374 pounds of oil to the market, resulting in 257,900 pounds of oil available for contracting for 2006–2007 marketing year. The Committee was reluctant to increase the salable quantity any more due to the uncertainty of the 2006–2007 marketing year; however, the Committee believed that an increase was necessary to supply the higher quantity demanded according to their revised market estimate. Therefore, the industry may not be able to meet market demand without this increase. In addition, when the Committee made its original recommendation for the establishment of the Native spearmint oil salable quantity and allotment percentage for the 2006–2007 marketing year, it had anticipated that the year would end with an ample available supply. Based on its analysis of available information, USDA has determined that the salable quantity and allotment percentage for Native spearmint oil for the 2006–2007 marketing year should be increased to 1,161,260 pounds and 53 percent, respectively. This rule relaxes the regulation of Native spearmint oil and will allow producers to meet market demand while improving producer returns. In conjunction with the issuance of this VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:42 May 25, 2006 Jkt 208001 rule, the Committee’s revised marketing policy statement for the 2006–2007 marketing year has been reviewed by USDA. The Committee’s marketing policy statement, a requirement whenever the Committee recommends implementing volume regulations or recommends revisions to existing volume regulations, meets the intent of § 985.50 of the order. During its discussion of revising the 2006–2007 salable quantity and allotment percentage, the Committee considered: (1) The estimated quantity of salable oil of each class held by producers and handlers; (2) the estimated demand for each class of oil; (3) prospective production of each class of oil; (4) total of allotment bases of each class of oil for the current marketing year and the estimated total of allotment bases of each class for the ensuing marketing year; (5) the quantity of reserve oil, by class, in storage; (6) producer prices of oil, including prices for each class of oil; and (7) general market conditions for each class of oil, including whether the estimated season average price to producers is likely to exceed parity. Conformity with USDA’s ‘‘Guidelines for Fruit, Vegetable, and Specialty Crop Marketing Orders’’ has also been reviewed and confirmed. The increase in the Native spearmint oil salable quantity and allotment percentage allows for anticipated market needs for this class of oil. In determining anticipated market needs, consideration by the Committee was given to historical sales, and changes and trends in production and demand. Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Pursuant to requirements set forth in the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA), the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) has considered the economic impact of this action on small entities. Accordingly, AMS has prepared this initial regulatory flexibility analysis. The purpose of the RFA is to fit regulatory actions to the scale of business subject to such actions in order that small businesses will not be unduly or disproportionately burdened. Marketing orders issued pursuant to the Act, and the rules issued thereunder, are unique in that they are brought about through group action of essentially small entities acting on their own behalf. Thus, both statutes have small entity orientation and compatibility. There are eight spearmint oil handlers subject to regulation under the order, and approximately 59 producers of Scotch spearmint oil and approximately 88 producers of Native spearmint oil in the regulated production area. Small agricultural service firms are defined by PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 the Small Business Administration (SBA) (13 CFR 121.201) as those having annual receipts of less than $6,500,000, and small agricultural producers are defined as those having annual receipts of less than $750,000. Based on the SBA’s definition of small entities, the Committee estimates that 2 of the 8 handlers regulated by the order could be considered small entities. Most of the handlers are large corporations involved in the international trading of essential oils and the products of essential oils. In addition, the Committee estimates that 19 of the 59 Scotch spearmint oil producers and 18 of the 88 Native spearmint oil producers could be classified as small entities under the SBA definition. Thus, a majority of handlers and producers of Far West spearmint oil may not be classified as small entities. The Far West spearmint oil industry is characterized by producers whose farming operations generally involve more than one commodity, and whose income from farming operations is not exclusively dependent on the production of spearmint oil. A typical spearmint oil-producing operation has enough acreage for rotation such that the total acreage required to produce the crop is about one-third spearmint and two-thirds rotational crops. Thus, the typical spearmint oil producer has to have considerably more acreage than is planted to spearmint during any given season. Crop rotation is an essential cultural practice in the production of spearmint for weed, insect, and disease control. To remain economically viable with the added costs associated with spearmint oil production, most spearmint oil-producing farms fall into the SBA category of large businesses. Small spearmint oil producers generally are not as extensively diversified as larger ones and as such are more at risk to market fluctuations. Such small producers generally need to market their entire annual crop and do not have the luxury of having other crops to cushion seasons with poor spearmint oil returns. Conversely, large diversified producers have the potential to endure one or more seasons of poor spearmint oil markets because income from alternate crops could support the operation for a period of time. Being reasonably assured of a stable price and market provides small producing entities with the ability to maintain proper cash flow and to meet annual expenses. Thus, the market and price stability provided by the order potentially benefit the small producer more than such provisions benefit large producers. Even though a majority of E:\FR\FM\26MYR1.SGM 26MYR1 cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with RULES Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 102 / Friday, May 26, 2006 / Rules and Regulations handlers and producers of spearmint oil may not be classified as small entities, the volume control feature of this order has small entity orientation. This rule revises the quantity of Native spearmint oil that handlers may purchase from, or handle for, producers during the 2006–2007 marketing year, which ends on May 31, 2007. This rule increases the Native spearmint oil salable quantity from 1,007,886 pounds to 1,161,260 pounds, and the allotment percentage from 46 percent to 53 percent. An econometric model was used to assess the impact that volume control has on the prices producers receive for their commodity. Without volume control, spearmint oil markets would likely be over-supplied, resulting in low producer prices and a large volume of oil stored and carried over to the next crop year. The model estimates how much lower producer prices would likely be in the absence of volume controls. The recommended allotment percentages, upon which 2006–2007 producer allotments are based, are 45 percent for Scotch and 53 percent for Native (a 7 percentage point increase from the original salable percentage of 46 percent). Without volume controls, producers would not be limited to these allotment levels, and could produce and sell additional spearmint oil. The econometric model estimated a $1.40 decline in the season average producer price per pound (from both classes of spearmint oil) resulting from the higher quantities that would be produced and marketed if volume controls were not used (i.e., if the salable percentages were set at 100 percent). Loosening the volume control restriction by increasing the allotment percentages resulted in this revised price decline estimate of $1.40 per pound if volume controls were not used. A previous price decline estimate of $1.49 per pound was based on the 2006–2007 allotment percentages (45 percent for Scotch and 46 percent for Native) published in the Federal Register on April 5, 2006 (71 FR 16986). The surplus situation for the spearmint oil market that would exist without volume controls in 2006–2007 also would likely dampen prospects for improved producer prices in future years because of the buildup in stocks. The use of volume controls allows the industry to fully supply spearmint oil markets while avoiding the negative consequences of over-supplying these markets. The use of volume controls is believed to have little or no effect on consumer prices of products containing VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:42 May 25, 2006 Jkt 208001 spearmint oil and will not result in fewer retail sales of such products. Based on projections available at the meeting, the Committee considered alternatives to the increase. The Committee not only considered leaving the salable quantity and allotment percentage unchanged, but also looked at various increases ranging from 0 percent to 10 percent. The Committee reached its recommendation to increase the salable quantity and allotment percentage for Native spearmint oil after careful consideration of all available information, and believes that the level recommended will achieve the objectives sought. Without the increase, the Committee believes the industry would not be able to meet market needs. This rule will not impose any additional reporting or recordkeeping requirements on either small or large spearmint oil handlers. As with all Federal marketing order programs, reports and forms are periodically reviewed to reduce information requirements and duplication by industry and public sector agencies. AMS is committed to compliance with the Government Paperwork Elimination Act (GPEA), which requires Government agencies in general to provide the public the option of submitting information or transacting business electronically to the maximum extent possible. In addition, USDA has not identified any relevant Federal rules that duplicate, overlap or conflict with this rule. Further, the Committee’s meeting was widely publicized throughout the spearmint oil industry and all interested persons were invited to attend the meeting and participate in Committee deliberations. Like all Committee meetings, the April 18, 2006, meeting was a public meeting and all entities, both large and small, were able to express their views on this issue. Finally, interested persons are invited to submit information on the regulatory and informational impacts of this action on small businesses. A small business guide on complying with fruit, vegetable, and specialty crop marketing agreements and orders may be viewed at: http://www.ams.usda.gov/ fv/moab.html. Any questions about the compliance guide should be sent to Jay Guerber at the previously mentioned address in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. This rule invites comments on a change to the salable quantity and allotment percentage for Native spearmint oil for the 2006–2007 marketing year. Any comments received PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 30269 will be considered prior to finalization of this rule. After consideration of all relevant material presented, including the Committee’s recommendation, and other information, it is found that this interim final rule, as hereinafter set forth, will tend to effectuate the declared policy of the Act. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553, it is also found and determined upon good cause that it is impracticable, unnecessary, and contrary to the public interest to give preliminary notice prior to putting this rule into effect and that good cause exists for not postponing the effective date of this rule until 30 days after publication in the Federal Register because: (1) This rule increases the quantity of Native spearmint oil that may be marketed during the marketing year which ends on May 31, 2007; (2) the current quantity of Native spearmint oil may be inadequate to meet demand for the 2006–2007 marketing year, thus making the additional oil available as soon as is practicable will be beneficial to both handlers and producers; (3) the Committee recommended these changes at a public meeting and interested parties had an opportunity to provide input; and (4) this rule provides a 60day comment period and any comments received will be considered prior to finalization of this rule. List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 985 Marketing agreements, Oils and fats, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Spearmint oil. For the reasons set forth in the preamble, 7 CFR part 985 is amended as follows: I PART 985—MARKETING ORDER REGULATING THE HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST 1. The authority citation for 7 CFR part 985 continues to read as follows: I Authority: 7 U.S.C. 601–674. 2. In § 985.225, paragraph (b) is revised to read as follows: I Note: This section will not appear in the annual Code of Federal Regulations. § 985.225 Salable quantities and allotment percentages—2006–2007 marketing year. * * * * * (b) Class 3 (Native) oil—a salable quantity of 1,161,260 pounds and an allotment percentage of 53 percent. E:\FR\FM\26MYR1.SGM 26MYR1 30270 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 102 / Friday, May 26, 2006 / Rules and Regulations Dated: May 22, 2006 Lloyd C. Day, Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service. [FR Doc. E6–8105 Filed 5–25–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–02–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2006–23841; Directorate Identifier 2005–NM–214–AD; Amendment 39–14613; AD 2006–11–09] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier Model CL–600–2B19 (Regional Jet Series 100 & 440) Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Bombardier Model CL–600–2B19 (Regional Jet Series 100 & 440) airplanes. This AD requires revising the Airworthiness Limitations section of the Instructions for Continuing Airworthiness of the Maintenance Requirements Manual to include revised threshold and repeat inspection intervals for the cargo door skin cut-out. This AD results from a report that a crack was discovered at the lower forward corner of a cargo door skin cutout during fatigue testing. We are issuing this AD to detect and correct cracking in the lower forward corner of the cargo door skin cut-out, which could result in reduced structural integrity of the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes effective June 30, 2006. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of a certain publication listed in the AD as of June 30, 2006. ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// dms.dot.gov or in person at the Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street SW., Nassif Building, Room PL–401, Washington, DC. Contact Bombardier, Inc., Canadair, Aerospace Group, P.O. Box 6087, Station Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3G9, Canada, for service information identified in this AD. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Beckwith, Aerospace Engineer, Airframe and Propulsion Branch, ANE– 171, FAA, New York Aircraft Certification Office, 1600 Stewart Avenue, suite 410, Westbury, New York 11590; telephone (516) 228–7302; fax (516) 794–5531. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Examining the Docket You may examine the airworthiness directive (AD) docket on the Internet at http://dms.dot.gov or in person at the Docket Management Facility office between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The Docket Management Facility office (telephone (800) 647–5227) is located on the plaza level of the Nassif Building at the street address stated in the ADDRESSES section. Discussion The FAA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR part 39 to include an AD that would apply to certain Bombardier Model CL– 600–2B19 (Regional Jet Series 100 & 440) airplanes. That NPRM was published in the Federal Register on February 9, 2006 (71 FR 6683). That NPRM proposed to require revising the Airworthiness Limitations section of the Instructions for Continuing Airworthiness of the Maintenance Requirements Manual to include revised threshold and repeat inspection intervals for the cargo door skin cut-out. Comments We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the development of this AD. We have considered the comment received. Request To Change Applicability Air Wisconsin notes that the applicability of the proposed AD includes airplanes with serial numbers 7003 and subsequent on which Bombardier Modsum TC601R16421 or TC601R16422 has not been accomplished. Air Wisconsin also notes that Modsums cannot be accomplished on in-service airplanes because inservice airplanes are modified per service bulletins, in this case Bombardier Service Bulletin 601R–53– 070. Air Wisconsin states that Bombardier Service Bulletin 601R–53– 070 will be released very soon to communicate in-service Modsum TC601R16422; and that the actions in that service bulletin will be terminating action for in-service airplanes. This will limit the applicability to serial number 7003 to 8129 because production Modsum TC601R16421 will be accomplished on serial number 8130 and subsequent. We infer that Air Wisconsin is requesting that we change the applicability of the proposed AD to include a reference to Bombardier Service Bulletin 601R–53–070, and to limit the affected serial numbers to 7003 through 8129 inclusive. We disagree. There may be production delays that would result in a change to those airplanes on which production Modsum TC601R16421 is accomplished in production. In addition, Bombardier Service Bulletin 601R–53–070 has not been released by Bombardier, and we cannot refer to a document that is not yet released and approved. The actions in this AD are not required if one of the Modsums has been accomplished on an airplane. Bombardier can provide methods for showing that a Modsum has been accomplished. Also, an operator may request an alternative method of compliance in accordance with the procedures in paragraph (g) of this AD. We have not changed the AD in this regard. Conclusion We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the comment received, and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting the AD as proposed. Costs of Compliance The following table provides the estimated costs for U.S. operators to comply with this AD. cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with RULES ESTIMATED COSTS Action Work hours Average labor rate per hour Cost per airplane Number of U.S.-registered airplanes Fleet cost AWL Revision ...................................................................... 1 $65 $65 738 $47,970 VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:42 May 25, 2006 Jkt 208001 PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\26MYR1.SGM 26MYR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 102 (Friday, May 26, 2006)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 30266-30270]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E6-8105]


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Agricultural Marketing Service

7 CFR Part 985

[Docket No. FV06-985-2 IFR]


Marketing Order Regulating the Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced 
in the Far West; Revision of the Salable Quantity and Allotment 
Percentage for Class 3 (Native) Spearmint Oil for the 2006-2007 
Marketing Year

AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA.

ACTION: Interim final rule with request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This rule revises the quantity of Class 3 (Native) spearmint 
oil that handlers may purchase from, or handle for, producers during 
the 2006-2007 marketing year. This rule increases the Native spearmint 
oil salable quantity from 1,007,886 pounds to 1,161,260 pounds, and the 
allotment percentage from 46 percent to 53 percent. The marketing order 
regulates the handling of spearmint oil produced in the Far West and is 
administered locally by the Spearmint Oil Administrative Committee 
(Committee). The Committee recommended this rule for the purpose of 
avoiding extreme fluctuations in supplies and prices and to help 
maintain stability in the Far West spearmint oil market.

DATES: Effective June 1, 2006, through May 31, 2007; comments received 
by July 25, 2006 will be considered prior to issuance of a final rule.

ADDRESSES: Interested persons are invited to submit written comments

[[Page 30267]]

concerning this rule. Comments must be sent to the Docket Clerk, 
Marketing Order Administration Branch, Fruit and Vegetable Programs, 
AMS, USDA, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., STOP 0237, Washington, DC 
20250-0237; Fax: (202) 720-8938; E-mail: moab.docketclerk@usda.gov; or 
Internet: http://www.regulations.gov. All comments should reference the 
docket number and the date and page number of this issue of the Federal 
Register and will be made available for public inspection in the Office 
of the Docket Clerk during regular business hours, or can be viewed at: 
http://www.ams.usda.gov/fv/moab.html.
    FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan M. Hiller, Northwest Marketing 
Field Office, Marketing Order Administration Branch, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, AMS, USDA; Telephone: (503) 326-2724, Fax: (503) 
326-7440.
    Small businesses may request information on complying with this 
regulation by contacting Jay Guerber, Marketing Order Administration 
Branch, Fruit and Vegetable Programs, AMS, USDA, 1400 Independence 
Avenue SW., STOP 0237, Washington, DC 20250-0237; Telephone: (202) 720-
2491, Fax: (202) 720-8938, or E-mail: Jay.Guerber@usda.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This rule is issued under Marketing Order 
No. 985 (7 CFR part 985), as amended, regulating the handling of 
spearmint oil produced in the Far West (Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and 
designated parts of Nevada and Utah), hereinafter referred to as the 
``order.'' The order is effective under the Agricultural Marketing 
Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601-674), hereinafter 
referred to as the ``Act.''
    The Department of Agriculture (USDA) is issuing this rule in 
conformance with Executive Order 12866.
    This rule has been reviewed under Executive Order 12988, Civil 
Justice Reform. Under the provisions of the marketing order now in 
effect, salable quantities and allotment percentages may be established 
for classes of spearmint oil produced in the Far West. This rule 
increases the quantity of Native spearmint oil produced in the Far West 
that may be purchased from or handled for producers by handlers during 
the 2006-2007 marketing year, which ends on May 31, 2007. This rule 
will not preempt any State or local laws, regulations, or policies, 
unless they present an irreconcilable conflict with this rule.
    The Act provides that administrative proceedings must be exhausted 
before parties may file suit in court. Under section 608c(15)(A) of the 
Act, any handler subject to an order may file with USDA a petition 
stating that the order, any provision of the order, or any obligation 
imposed in connection with the order is not in accordance with law and 
request a modification of the order or to be exempted therefrom. A 
handler is afforded the opportunity for a hearing on the petition. 
After the hearing USDA would rule on the petition. The Act provides 
that the district court of the United States in any district in which 
the handler is an inhabitant, or has his or her principal place of 
business, has jurisdiction to review USDA's ruling on the petition, 
provided an action is filed not later than 20 days after the date of 
the entry of the ruling.
    The original salable quantity and allotment percentages for Scotch 
and Native spearmint oil for the 2006-2007 marketing year were 
recommended by the Committee at its October 5, 2005, meeting. The 
Committee recommended salable quantities of 878,205 pounds and 
1,007,886 pounds, and allotment percentages of 45 percent and 46 
percent, respectively, for Scotch and Native spearmint oil. A proposed 
rule was published in the Federal Register on February 1, 2006 (71 FR 
5183). Comments on the proposed rule were solicited from interested 
persons until March 3, 2006. No comments were received. Subsequently, a 
final rule establishing the salable quantities and allotment 
percentages for Scotch and Native spearmint oil for the 2006-2007 
marketing year was published in the Federal Register on April 5, 2006 
(71 FR 16986).
    This rule revises the quantity of Native spearmint oil that 
handlers may purchase from, or handle for, producers during the 2006-
2007 marketing year, which ends on May 31, 2007. Pursuant to authority 
contained in Sec. Sec.  985.50, 985.51, and 985.52 of the order, the 
Committee, with seven of the eight members present, met on April 18, 
2006, and unanimously recommended that the 2006-2007 Native spearmint 
oil allotment percentage be increased by 7 percent.
    Thus, taking into consideration the following discussion on 
adjustments to the Native spearmint oil salable quantity, this rule 
increases the 2006-2007 marketing year salable quantity and allotment 
percentage for Native spearmint oil to 1,161,260 pounds and 53 percent, 
respectively.
    The salable quantity is the total quantity of each class of oil 
that handlers may purchase from, or handle for, producers during the 
marketing year. The total salable quantity is divided by the total 
industry allotment base to determine an allotment percentage. Each 
producer is allotted a share of the salable quantity by applying the 
allotment percentage to the producer's individual allotment base for 
the applicable class of spearmint oil.
    The estimated total industry allotment base for Native spearmint 
oil for the 2006-2007 marketing year was established at 2,191,056 
pounds. This figure represents a one percent increase over the revised 
2005-2006 total allotment base. This figure is generally revised each 
year on June 1 due to producer base being lost due to the bona fide 
effort production provisions of Sec.  985.53(e). The revision is 
usually minimal.
    By increasing the salable quantity and allotment percentage, this 
rule makes an additional amount of Native spearmint oil available by 
releasing oil from the reserve pool. When applied to each individual 
producer, the allotment percentage increase allows each producer to 
take up to an amount equal to their allotment base from their reserve 
for this respective class of oil. Before November 1, 2006, a producer 
may also transfer excess oil to another producer to enable that 
producer to fill a deficiency in that producer's annual allotment for 
this class of oil.
    The following table summarizes the Committee recommendation:

Native Spearmint Oil Recommendation

    (A) Estimated 2006-2007 Allotment Base--2,191,056 pounds. This is 
the estimate on which the original 2006-2007 Native spearmint oil 
salable quantity and allotment percentage was based.
    (B) Original 2006-2007 Allotment Percentage--46 percent. This was 
unanimously recommended by the Committee on October 5, 2005.
    (C) Original 2006-2007 Salable Quantity--1,007,886 pounds. This 
figure is 46 percent of the estimated 2006-2007 allotment base of 
2,191,056 pounds.
    (D) Increase in Allotment Percentage--7 percent. The Committee 
recommended a 7 percent increase at its April 18, 2006, meeting.
    (E) 2006-2007 Allotment Percentage--53 percent. This figure is 
derived by adding the increase of 7 percent to the original 2006-2007 
allotment percentage of 46 percent.
    (F) Calculated Revised 2006-2007 Salable Quantity--1,161,260 
pounds. This figure is 53 percent of the estimated 2006-2007 allotment 
base of 2,191,056 pounds.
    (G) Computed Increase in the 2006-2007 Salable Quantity--153,374

[[Page 30268]]

pounds. This figure is 7 percent of the estimated 2006-2007 allotment 
base of 2,191,056 pounds.
    In making this recommendation, the Committee considered all 
available information on price, supply, and demand. The Committee also 
considered reports and other information from handlers and producers in 
attendance at the meeting and reports given by the Committee manager 
from handlers and producers who were not in attendance. On average, 
handlers estimated that the demand for 2006-2007 spearmint oil is 
300,000 pounds above the quantity already contracted for sale.
    The 2006-2007 marketing year will begin on June 1, 2006, with an 
estimated carry-in of 50,000 pounds of salable oil. When the estimated 
carry-in is added to the original 2006-2007 salable quantity of 
1,007,886 pounds, a total estimated available supply for the 2006-2007 
marketing year of 1,057,886 pounds results. Of this amount, 819,560 
pounds of oil has already been contracted for the 2006-2007 marketing 
year. Additionally, an estimated deficiency of 133,800 pounds may exist 
from producers not producing their full salable quantity. As a result, 
an estimated 104,526 pounds of oil would remain uncontracted and 
available for sale without this increase. This increase will supply an 
additional 153,374 pounds of oil to the market, resulting in 257,900 
pounds of oil available for contracting for 2006-2007 marketing year.
    The Committee was reluctant to increase the salable quantity any 
more due to the uncertainty of the 2006-2007 marketing year; however, 
the Committee believed that an increase was necessary to supply the 
higher quantity demanded according to their revised market estimate. 
Therefore, the industry may not be able to meet market demand without 
this increase. In addition, when the Committee made its original 
recommendation for the establishment of the Native spearmint oil 
salable quantity and allotment percentage for the 2006-2007 marketing 
year, it had anticipated that the year would end with an ample 
available supply.
    Based on its analysis of available information, USDA has determined 
that the salable quantity and allotment percentage for Native spearmint 
oil for the 2006-2007 marketing year should be increased to 1,161,260 
pounds and 53 percent, respectively.
    This rule relaxes the regulation of Native spearmint oil and will 
allow producers to meet market demand while improving producer returns. 
In conjunction with the issuance of this rule, the Committee's revised 
marketing policy statement for the 2006-2007 marketing year has been 
reviewed by USDA. The Committee's marketing policy statement, a 
requirement whenever the Committee recommends implementing volume 
regulations or recommends revisions to existing volume regulations, 
meets the intent of Sec.  985.50 of the order. During its discussion of 
revising the 2006-2007 salable quantity and allotment percentage, the 
Committee considered: (1) The estimated quantity of salable oil of each 
class held by producers and handlers; (2) the estimated demand for each 
class of oil; (3) prospective production of each class of oil; (4) 
total of allotment bases of each class of oil for the current marketing 
year and the estimated total of allotment bases of each class for the 
ensuing marketing year; (5) the quantity of reserve oil, by class, in 
storage; (6) producer prices of oil, including prices for each class of 
oil; and (7) general market conditions for each class of oil, including 
whether the estimated season average price to producers is likely to 
exceed parity. Conformity with USDA's ``Guidelines for Fruit, 
Vegetable, and Specialty Crop Marketing Orders'' has also been reviewed 
and confirmed.
    The increase in the Native spearmint oil salable quantity and 
allotment percentage allows for anticipated market needs for this class 
of oil. In determining anticipated market needs, consideration by the 
Committee was given to historical sales, and changes and trends in 
production and demand.

Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

    Pursuant to requirements set forth in the Regulatory Flexibility 
Act (RFA), the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) has considered the 
economic impact of this action on small entities. Accordingly, AMS has 
prepared this initial regulatory flexibility analysis.
    The purpose of the RFA is to fit regulatory actions to the scale of 
business subject to such actions in order that small businesses will 
not be unduly or disproportionately burdened. Marketing orders issued 
pursuant to the Act, and the rules issued thereunder, are unique in 
that they are brought about through group action of essentially small 
entities acting on their own behalf. Thus, both statutes have small 
entity orientation and compatibility.
    There are eight spearmint oil handlers subject to regulation under 
the order, and approximately 59 producers of Scotch spearmint oil and 
approximately 88 producers of Native spearmint oil in the regulated 
production area. Small agricultural service firms are defined by the 
Small Business Administration (SBA) (13 CFR 121.201) as those having 
annual receipts of less than $6,500,000, and small agricultural 
producers are defined as those having annual receipts of less than 
$750,000.
    Based on the SBA's definition of small entities, the Committee 
estimates that 2 of the 8 handlers regulated by the order could be 
considered small entities. Most of the handlers are large corporations 
involved in the international trading of essential oils and the 
products of essential oils. In addition, the Committee estimates that 
19 of the 59 Scotch spearmint oil producers and 18 of the 88 Native 
spearmint oil producers could be classified as small entities under the 
SBA definition. Thus, a majority of handlers and producers of Far West 
spearmint oil may not be classified as small entities.
    The Far West spearmint oil industry is characterized by producers 
whose farming operations generally involve more than one commodity, and 
whose income from farming operations is not exclusively dependent on 
the production of spearmint oil. A typical spearmint oil-producing 
operation has enough acreage for rotation such that the total acreage 
required to produce the crop is about one-third spearmint and two-
thirds rotational crops. Thus, the typical spearmint oil producer has 
to have considerably more acreage than is planted to spearmint during 
any given season. Crop rotation is an essential cultural practice in 
the production of spearmint for weed, insect, and disease control. To 
remain economically viable with the added costs associated with 
spearmint oil production, most spearmint oil-producing farms fall into 
the SBA category of large businesses.
    Small spearmint oil producers generally are not as extensively 
diversified as larger ones and as such are more at risk to market 
fluctuations. Such small producers generally need to market their 
entire annual crop and do not have the luxury of having other crops to 
cushion seasons with poor spearmint oil returns. Conversely, large 
diversified producers have the potential to endure one or more seasons 
of poor spearmint oil markets because income from alternate crops could 
support the operation for a period of time. Being reasonably assured of 
a stable price and market provides small producing entities with the 
ability to maintain proper cash flow and to meet annual expenses. Thus, 
the market and price stability provided by the order potentially 
benefit the small producer more than such provisions benefit large 
producers. Even though a majority of

[[Page 30269]]

handlers and producers of spearmint oil may not be classified as small 
entities, the volume control feature of this order has small entity 
orientation.
    This rule revises the quantity of Native spearmint oil that 
handlers may purchase from, or handle for, producers during the 2006-
2007 marketing year, which ends on May 31, 2007. This rule increases 
the Native spearmint oil salable quantity from 1,007,886 pounds to 
1,161,260 pounds, and the allotment percentage from 46 percent to 53 
percent.
    An econometric model was used to assess the impact that volume 
control has on the prices producers receive for their commodity. 
Without volume control, spearmint oil markets would likely be over-
supplied, resulting in low producer prices and a large volume of oil 
stored and carried over to the next crop year. The model estimates how 
much lower producer prices would likely be in the absence of volume 
controls.
    The recommended allotment percentages, upon which 2006-2007 
producer allotments are based, are 45 percent for Scotch and 53 percent 
for Native (a 7 percentage point increase from the original salable 
percentage of 46 percent). Without volume controls, producers would not 
be limited to these allotment levels, and could produce and sell 
additional spearmint oil. The econometric model estimated a $1.40 
decline in the season average producer price per pound (from both 
classes of spearmint oil) resulting from the higher quantities that 
would be produced and marketed if volume controls were not used (i.e., 
if the salable percentages were set at 100 percent).
    Loosening the volume control restriction by increasing the 
allotment percentages resulted in this revised price decline estimate 
of $1.40 per pound if volume controls were not used. A previous price 
decline estimate of $1.49 per pound was based on the 2006-2007 
allotment percentages (45 percent for Scotch and 46 percent for Native) 
published in the Federal Register on April 5, 2006 (71 FR 16986).
    The surplus situation for the spearmint oil market that would exist 
without volume controls in 2006-2007 also would likely dampen prospects 
for improved producer prices in future years because of the buildup in 
stocks.
    The use of volume controls allows the industry to fully supply 
spearmint oil markets while avoiding the negative consequences of over-
supplying these markets. The use of volume controls is believed to have 
little or no effect on consumer prices of products containing spearmint 
oil and will not result in fewer retail sales of such products.
    Based on projections available at the meeting, the Committee 
considered alternatives to the increase. The Committee not only 
considered leaving the salable quantity and allotment percentage 
unchanged, but also looked at various increases ranging from 0 percent 
to 10 percent. The Committee reached its recommendation to increase the 
salable quantity and allotment percentage for Native spearmint oil 
after careful consideration of all available information, and believes 
that the level recommended will achieve the objectives sought. Without 
the increase, the Committee believes the industry would not be able to 
meet market needs.
    This rule will not impose any additional reporting or recordkeeping 
requirements on either small or large spearmint oil handlers. As with 
all Federal marketing order programs, reports and forms are 
periodically reviewed to reduce information requirements and 
duplication by industry and public sector agencies.
    AMS is committed to compliance with the Government Paperwork 
Elimination Act (GPEA), which requires Government agencies in general 
to provide the public the option of submitting information or 
transacting business electronically to the maximum extent possible.
    In addition, USDA has not identified any relevant Federal rules 
that duplicate, overlap or conflict with this rule.
    Further, the Committee's meeting was widely publicized throughout 
the spearmint oil industry and all interested persons were invited to 
attend the meeting and participate in Committee deliberations. Like all 
Committee meetings, the April 18, 2006, meeting was a public meeting 
and all entities, both large and small, were able to express their 
views on this issue. Finally, interested persons are invited to submit 
information on the regulatory and informational impacts of this action 
on small businesses.
    A small business guide on complying with fruit, vegetable, and 
specialty crop marketing agreements and orders may be viewed at: http:/
/www.ams.usda.gov/fv/moab.html. Any questions about the compliance 
guide should be sent to Jay Guerber at the previously mentioned address 
in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section.
    This rule invites comments on a change to the salable quantity and 
allotment percentage for Native spearmint oil for the 2006-2007 
marketing year. Any comments received will be considered prior to 
finalization of this rule.
    After consideration of all relevant material presented, including 
the Committee's recommendation, and other information, it is found that 
this interim final rule, as hereinafter set forth, will tend to 
effectuate the declared policy of the Act.
    Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553, it is also found and determined upon good 
cause that it is impracticable, unnecessary, and contrary to the public 
interest to give preliminary notice prior to putting this rule into 
effect and that good cause exists for not postponing the effective date 
of this rule until 30 days after publication in the Federal Register 
because: (1) This rule increases the quantity of Native spearmint oil 
that may be marketed during the marketing year which ends on May 31, 
2007; (2) the current quantity of Native spearmint oil may be 
inadequate to meet demand for the 2006-2007 marketing year, thus making 
the additional oil available as soon as is practicable will be 
beneficial to both handlers and producers; (3) the Committee 
recommended these changes at a public meeting and interested parties 
had an opportunity to provide input; and (4) this rule provides a 60-
day comment period and any comments received will be considered prior 
to finalization of this rule.

List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 985

    Marketing agreements, Oils and fats, Reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements, Spearmint oil.


0
For the reasons set forth in the preamble, 7 CFR part 985 is amended as 
follows:

PART 985--MARKETING ORDER REGULATING THE HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL 
PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST

0
1. The authority citation for 7 CFR part 985 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 7 U.S.C. 601-674.


0
2. In Sec.  985.225, paragraph (b) is revised to read as follows:


    Note: This section will not appear in the annual Code of Federal 
Regulations.

Sec.  985.225  Salable quantities and allotment percentages--2006-2007 
marketing year.

* * * * *
    (b) Class 3 (Native) oil--a salable quantity of 1,161,260 pounds 
and an allotment percentage of 53 percent.


[[Page 30270]]


    Dated: May 22, 2006
Lloyd C. Day,
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service.
[FR Doc. E6-8105 Filed 5-25-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3410-02-P