Notification of American Eagle Gold Proof Coin Price Increase, 30229-30230 [E6-8066]

Download as PDF cchase on PROD1PC60 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 101 / Thursday, May 25, 2006 / Notices for the same individual exposed to certain risks for two different time periods vary only slightly. (See Bates and Neyman, University of California Publications in Statistics, April 1952.) Other studies demonstrated theories of predicting crash proneness from crash history coupled with other factors. These factors—such as age, sex, geographic location, mileage driven and conviction history—are used every day by insurance companies and motor vehicle bureaus to predict the probability of an individual experiencing future crashes. (See Weber, Donald C., ‘‘Accident Rate Potential: An Application of Multiple Regression Analysis of a Poisson Process,’’ Journal of American Statistical Association, June 1971.) A 1964 California Driver Record Study prepared by the California Department of Motor Vehicles concluded that the best overall crash predictor for both concurrent and nonconcurrent events is the number of single convictions. This study used 3 consecutive years of data, comparing the experiences of drivers in the first 2 years with their experiences in the final year. Applying principles from these studies to the past 3-year record of the 16 applicants, none of the applicants had a traffic violation for speeding and none were involved in crashes. The applicants achieved this record of safety while driving with their vision impairment, demonstrating the likelihood that they have adapted their driving skills to accommodate their condition. As the applicants’ ample driving histories with their vision deficiencies are good predictors of future performance, FMCSA concludes their ability to drive safely can be projected into the future. We believe the applicants’ intrastate driving experience and history provide an adequate basis for predicting their ability to drive safely in interstate commerce. Intrastate driving, like interstate operations, involves substantial driving on highways on the interstate system and on other roads built to interstate standards. Moreover, driving in congested urban areas exposes the driver to more pedestrian and vehicular traffic than exists on interstate highways. Faster reaction to traffic and traffic signals is generally required because distances between them are more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver response just as intensely as interstate driving conditions. The veteran drivers in this proceeding have operated CMVs safely under those conditions for at least 3 years, most for much longer. Their experience and driving records lead us to believe that VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:42 May 24, 2006 Jkt 208001 each applicant is capable of operating in interstate commerce as safely as he/she has been performing in intrastate commerce. Consequently, FMCSA finds that exempting these applicants from the vision standard in 49 CFR 391.41(b)(10) is likely to achieve a level of safety equal to that existing without the exemption. For this reason, the Agency is granting the exemptions for the 2-year period allowed by 49 U.S.C. 31136(e) and 31315 to the 16 applicants listed in the Notice of March 22, 2006 (71 FR 14566). We recognize that the vision of an applicant may change and affect his/her ability to operate a CMV as safely as in the past. As a condition of the exemption, therefore, FMCSA will impose requirements on the 16 individuals consistent with the grandfathering provisions applied to drivers who participated in the Agency’s vision waiver program. Those requirements are found at 49 CFR 391.64(b) and include the following: (1) That each individual be physically examined every year (a) by an ophthalmologist or optometrist who attests that the vision in the better eye continues to meet the standard in 49 CFR 391.41(b)(10), and (b) by a medical examiner who attests that the individual is otherwise physically qualified under 49 CFR 391.41; (2) that each individual provide a copy of the ophthalmologist’s or optometrist’s report to the medical examiner at the time of the annual medical examination; and (3) that each individual provide a copy of the annual medical certification to the employer for retention in the driver’s qualification file, or keep a copy in his/her driver’s qualification file if he/she is selfemployed. The driver must also have a copy of the certification when driving, for presentation to a duly authorized Federal, State, or local enforcement official. Discussion of Comments Frm 00117 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 The issues raised by Advocates were addressed at length in 64 FR 51568 (September 23, 1999), 64 FR 66962 (November 30, 1999), 64 FR 69586 (December 13, 1999), 65 FR 159 (January 3, 2000), 65 FR 57230 (September 21, 2000), and 66 FR 13825 (March 7, 2001). We will not address these points again here, but refer interested parties to those earlier discussions. Conclusion Based upon its evaluation of the 16 exemption applications, FMCSA exempts Juan D. Adame, Thomas G. Danclovic, Thomas W. Dufford, Williams F. Foote, Joshua G. Hansen, Daniel W. Henderson, Casey R. Johnson, Craig T. Jorgensen, Jose A. Lopez, William F. Mack, Bobby L. Mashburn, Albert L. Remsburg, Willard L. Riggle, Ricky L. Shepler, Barney J. Wade, and Kenneth E. Walker from the vision requirement in 49 CFR 391.41(b)(10), subject to the requirements cited above (49 CFR 391.64(b)). In accordance with 49 U.S.C. 31136(e) and 31315, each exemption will be valid for 2 years unless revoked earlier by FMCSA. The exemption will be revoked if: (1) The person fails to comply with the terms and conditions of the exemption; (2) the exemption has resulted in a lower level of safety than was maintained before it was granted; or (3) continuation of the exemption would not be consistent with the goals and objectives of 49 U.S.C. 31136 and 31315. If the exemption is still effective at the end of the 2-year period, the person may apply to FMCSA for a renewal under procedures in effect at that time. Issued on: May 18, 2006. Rose A. McMurray, Associate Administrator, Policy and Program Development. [FR Doc. E6–8076 Filed 5–24–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–EX–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety (Advocates) expressed opposition to FMCSA’s policy to grant exemptions from the FMCSR, including the driver qualification standards. Specifically, Advocates: (1) Objects to the manner in which FMCSA presents driver information to the public and makes safety determinations; (2) objects to the Agency’s reliance on conclusions drawn from the vision waiver program; (3) claims the Agency has misinterpreted statutory language on the granting of exemptions (49 U.S.C. 31136(e) and 31315); and finally (4) suggests that a 1999 Supreme Court decision affects the legal validity of vision exemptions. PO 00000 30229 United States Mint Notification of American Eagle Gold Proof Coin Price Increase SUMMARY: The recent rise in the price of gold requires that the United States Mint raise the prices on its 2006 American Eagle Gold Proof Coins. Pursuant to the authority that 31 U.S.C. 5112(i) and 5111(a)(3) grant the Secretary of the Treasury to mint and issue gold coins, and to prepare and distribute numismatic items, the United States Mint mints and issues American Eagle Gold Proof Coins in four denominations: One-ounce, one-half E:\FR\FM\25MYN1.SGM 25MYN1 30230 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 101 / Thursday, May 25, 2006 / Notices ounce, one-quarter ounce, one-tenth ounce, and a four-coin set that contains one coin of each denomination. In accordance with 31 U.S.C. 9701(b)(2)(B), the United States Mint is changing the price of these coins to reflect the increase in value of the underlying precious metal content of the coins—the result of recent increases in the market price of gold. The price of gold has increased substantially from the time the United States Mint last set prices for gold proof coins. Accordingly, effective May 22, 2006, the United States Mint will commence selling these coins according to the following price schedule: One-ounce gold proof coin ($885.00), one-half ounce gold proof coin ($445.00), one-quarter ounce gold proof coin ($220.00), one-tenth ounce gold proof coin ($110.00), four-coin gold proof set ($1,575.00). Prices are subject to change again based on future fluctuations in the market price of gold. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gloria Eskridge, Associate Director for Sales and Marketing, United States Mint, 801 Ninth Street, NW., Washington, DC 20220, or call 202–354– 7500. Authority: 31 U.S.C. 5111, 5112 & 9701. Dated: May 18, 2006. David A. Lebryk, Acting Director, United States Mint. [FR Doc. E6–8066 Filed 5–24–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4810–37–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Request for Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee Membership Applications SUMMARY: Pursuant to United States Code, Title 31, section 5135(b), the United States Mint is accepting applications for membership to the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) for a member representing the interests of the general public in the coinage of the United States. The CCAC was established to: cchase on PROD1PC60 with NOTICES I Advise the Secretary of the Treasury on any theme or design proposals relating to circulating coinage, bullion coinage, Congressional Gold Medals, VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:42 May 24, 2006 Jkt 208001 and national and other medals produced by the United States Mint. I Advise the Secretary of the Treasury with regard to the events, persons, or places that the CCAC recommends to be commemorated by the issuance of commemorative coins in each of the five calendar years succeeding the year in which a commemorative coin designation is made. I Make recommendations with respect to the mintage level for any commemorative coin recommended. Total membership consists of eleven voting members appointed by the Secretary of the Treasury: I One person specially qualified by virtue of his or her education, training or experience as nationally or internationally recognized curator in the United States of a numismatic collection; I One person specially qualified by virtue of his or her experience in the medallic arts or sculpture; I One person specially qualified by virtue of his or her education, training, or experience in American history; I One person specially qualified by virtue of his or her education, training, or experience in numismatics; I Three persons who can represent the interests of the general public in the coinage of the United States; and I Four persons appointed by the Secretary of the Treasury on the basis of the recommendations by the House and Senate leadership. Members are appointed for a term of four years. No individual may be appointed to the CCAC while serving as an officer or employee of the Federal Government. The CCAC is subject to the direction of the Secretary of the Treasury. Meetings of the CCAC are open to the public and are held approximately six to eight times per year. The United States Mint is responsible for providing the necessary support, technical services and advice to the CCAC. CCAC members are not paid for their time or services, but, consistent with Federal Travel Regulations, members are reimbursed for their travel and lodging expenses to attend meetings. Members are Special Government Employees and PO 00000 Frm 00118 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 are subject to the Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch (5 CFR Part 2653). The United States Mint will review all submissions and will forward its recommendations to the Secretary of the Treasury for appointment consideration. Candidates should include specific skills, abilities, talents, and credentials to support their applications. The United States Mint is also interested in candidates who have demonstrated leadership skills, have received recognition by their peers in their field of interest, have a record of participation in public service or activities, and are willing to commit the time and effort to participate in the CCAC meetings and related activities. Application Deadline: June 12, 2006. Receipt of Applications: Any member of the public wishing to be considered for participation on the CCAC should submit a resume and cover letter describing qualifications for membership, by fax to 202–756–6525, or by mail to the United States Mint, 801 9th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20001, Attn: Greg Weinman. Submissions must be postmarked no later than June 12, 2006. Notice Concerning Delivery of FirstClass and Priority Mail: The delivery of first-class mail to the United States Mint has been delayed since mid-October 2001 and delays are expected to continue. Until normal mail service resumes, please consider using alternate delivery services when sending timesensitive material. Some or all of the first-class and priority mail we receive may be put through an irradiation process to protect against biological contamination. Support materials put through this process may suffer irreversible damage. We encourage you to consider using alternate delivery services. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cliff Northup, United States Mint Liaison to the CCAC; 801 Ninth Street, NW.; Washington, DC 20220, or call 202–354– 7463. Dated: May 16, 2006. David A. Lebryk, Deputy Director, United States Mint. [FR Doc. E6–7975 Filed 5–24–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4810–37–P E:\FR\FM\25MYN1.SGM 25MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 101 (Thursday, May 25, 2006)]
[Notices]
[Pages 30229-30230]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E6-8066]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

United States Mint


Notification of American Eagle Gold Proof Coin Price Increase

SUMMARY: The recent rise in the price of gold requires that the United 
States Mint raise the prices on its 2006 American Eagle Gold Proof 
Coins.
    Pursuant to the authority that 31 U.S.C. 5112(i) and 5111(a)(3) 
grant the Secretary of the Treasury to mint and issue gold coins, and 
to prepare and distribute numismatic items, the United States Mint 
mints and issues American Eagle Gold Proof Coins in four denominations: 
One-ounce, one-half

[[Page 30230]]

ounce, one-quarter ounce, one-tenth ounce, and a four-coin set that 
contains one coin of each denomination. In accordance with 31 U.S.C. 
9701(b)(2)(B), the United States Mint is changing the price of these 
coins to reflect the increase in value of the underlying precious metal 
content of the coins--the result of recent increases in the market 
price of gold. The price of gold has increased substantially from the 
time the United States Mint last set prices for gold proof coins. 
Accordingly, effective May 22, 2006, the United States Mint will 
commence selling these coins according to the following price schedule: 
One-ounce gold proof coin ($885.00), one-half ounce gold proof coin 
($445.00), one-quarter ounce gold proof coin ($220.00), one-tenth ounce 
gold proof coin ($110.00), four-coin gold proof set ($1,575.00). Prices 
are subject to change again based on future fluctuations in the market 
price of gold.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gloria Eskridge, Associate Director 
for Sales and Marketing, United States Mint, 801 Ninth Street, NW., 
Washington, DC 20220, or call 202-354-7500.

    Authority: 31 U.S.C. 5111, 5112 & 9701.

    Dated: May 18, 2006.
David A. Lebryk,
Acting Director, United States Mint.
[FR Doc. E6-8066 Filed 5-24-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4810-37-P