Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan for Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge, Sherburne County, Minnesota, 7562-7563 [E6-1947]

Download as PDF rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with NOTICES 7562 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 29 / Monday, February 13, 2006 / Notices MedExpress/National Laboratory Center). Marshfield Laboratories, Forensic Toxicology Laboratory, 1000 North Oak Ave., Marshfield, WI 54449. 715– 389–3734/800–331–3734. MAXXAM Analytics Inc.,* 6740 Campobello Road, Mississauga, ON, Canada L5N 2L8. 905–817–5700. (Formerly: NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112. 651–636–7466/800–832–3244. MetroLab-Legacy Laboratory Services, 1225 NE 2nd Ave., Portland, OR 97232. 503–413–5295/800–950–5295. Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Forensic Toxicology Laboratory, 1 Veterans Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55417. 612–725– 2088. National Toxicology Laboratories, Inc., 1100 California Ave., Bakersfield, CA 93304. 661–322–4250/800–350–3515. One Source Toxicology Laboratory, Inc., 1213 Genoa-Red Bluff, Pasadena, TX 77504. 888–747–3774. (Formerly: University of Texas Medical Branch, Clinical Chemistry Division; UTMB Pathology-Toxicology Laboratory). Oregon Medical Laboratories, 123 International Way, Springfield, OR 97477. 541–341–8092. Pacific Toxicology Laboratories, 9348 DeSoto Ave., Chatsworth, CA 91311. 800–328–6942. (Formerly: Centinela Hospital Airport Toxicology Laboratory). Pathology Associates Medical Laboratories, 110 West Cliff Dr., Spokane, WA 99204. 509–755–8991/ 800–541–7897x7. Physicians Reference Laboratory, 7800 West 110th St., Overland Park, KS 66210. 913–339–0372/800–821–3627. Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 3175 Presidential Dr., Atlanta, GA 30340. 770–452–1590/800–729–6432. (Formerly: SmithKline Beecham Clinical Laboratories; SmithKline BioScience Laboratories). Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 4770 Regent Blvd., Irving, TX 75063. 800–824–6152. (Moved from the Dallas location on March 31, 2001; Formerly: SmithKline Beecham Clinical Laboratories; SmithKline Bio-Science Laboratories). Quest Diagnostics Incorporated , 4230 South Burnham Ave., Suite 250, Las Vegas, NV 89119–5412. 702–733– 7866/800–433–2750. (Formerly: Associated Pathologists Laboratories, Inc.). Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 10101 Renner Blvd., Lenexa, KS 66219. 913– 888–3927/800–873–8845. (Formerly: LabOne, Inc.; Center for Laboratory Services, a Division of LabOne, Inc.). VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:38 Feb 10, 2006 Jkt 208001 Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 400 Egypt Road, Norristown, PA 19403. 610–631–4600/877–642–2216. (Formerly: SmithKline Beecham Clinical Laboratories; SmithKline BioScience Laboratories). Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 506 E. State Pkwy., Schaumburg, IL 60173. 800–669–6995/847–885–2010. (Formerly: SmithKline Beecham Clinical Laboratories; International Toxicology Laboratories). Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 7600 Tyrone Ave., Van Nuys, CA 91405. 818–989–2520/800–877–2520. (Formerly: SmithKline Beecham Clinical Laboratories). Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, 2282 South Presidents Drive, Suite C, West Valley City, UT 84120. 801–606– 6301/800–322–3361. (Formerly: Northwest Toxicology, a LabOne Company; LabOne, Inc., dba Northwest Toxicology; NWT Drug Testing, NorthWest Toxicology, Inc.; Northwest Drug Testing, a division of NWT Inc.). S.E.D. Medical Laboratories, 5601 Office Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87109. 505– 727–6300/800–999–5227. South Bend Medical Foundation, Inc., 530 N. Lafayette Blvd., South Bend, IN 46601. 574–234–4176 x276. Southwest Laboratories, 4645 E. Cotton Center Boulevard, Suite 177, Phoenix, AZ 85040. 602–438–8507/800–279– 0027. Sparrow Health System, Toxicology Testing Center, St. Lawrence Campus, 1210 W. Saginaw, Lansing, MI 48915. 517–364–7400. (Formerly: St. Lawrence Hospital & Healthcare System). St. Anthony Hospital Toxicology Laboratory, 1000 N. Lee St., Oklahoma City, OK 73101. 405–272– 7052. Toxicology & Drug Monitoring Laboratory, University of Missouri Hospital & Clinics, 301 Business Loop 70 West, Suite 208, Columbia, MO 65203. 573–882–1273. Toxicology Testing Service, Inc., 5426 N.W. 79th Ave., Miami, FL 33166. 305–593–2260. US Army Forensic Toxicology Drug Testing Laboratory, 2490 Wilson St., Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755– 5235. 301–677–7085. Anna Marsh, Director, Office Program Services, SAMHSA. [FR Doc. E6–1945 Filed 2–10–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan for Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge, Sherburne County, Minnesota Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces that the Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) is available for Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge, Minnesota. The CCP was prepared pursuant to the National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966, as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Goals and objectives in the CCP describe how the agency intends to manage the refuge over the next 15 years. Copies of the Final CCP are available on compact disk or hard copy. You may access and download a copy via the planning Web site at http:// www.fws.gov/midwest/planning/ sherburne/index.html or you may obtain a copy by writing to the following address: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge, 17076 293rd Ave., Zimmerman, MN 55398. ADDRESSES: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anne Sittauer, at (763) 389–3323. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The 30,575-acre Sherburne National Wildlife is located in central Minnesota at the juncture of the northern boreal forest, the eastern deciduous forest, and the tallgrass prairie. It was established in 1965 under the general authority of the Migratory Bird Conservation Act of 1929 (16 U.S.C. 715d). The Refuge attracts over 230 species of birds each year to its diverse habitats. Of these, over 120 are known to nest in the area. The Refuge wetlands provide habitat for about 30 nesting pairs of Greater Sandhill Cranes and serve as a staging area for thousands of cranes during fall migration. During fall and spring migration, the Refuge wetlands also support thousands of waterfowl. The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966, as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 (16 U.S.C. 668dd–668ee et seq.), requires the Service to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose in developing CCPs is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year strategy for E:\FR\FM\13FEN1.SGM 13FEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 29 / Monday, February 13, 2006 / Notices achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and Service policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction for conserving wildlife and their habitats, the CCP identifies wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities available to the public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update these CCPs at least every 15 years in accordance with the National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966, as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321–4370d). Management of the refuge for the next 15 years will focus on: (1) Changes in the water impoundment system and upland management to create a diversity of wetland types and historic upland plant communities; (2) increased opportunities for all types of wildlifedependent recreation; and (3) outreach, private lands, and partnership activities that will emphasize natural processes, including native habitat restoration and conservation, to form ecologically functioning connections to and from the Refuge. Dated: November 23, 2005. Robyn Thorson, Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ft. Snelling, Minnesota. [FR Doc. E6–1947 Filed 2–10–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of permit applications. AGENCY: We invite the public to comment on the following application to conduct certain activities with endangered species. DATES: Comments on these permit applications must be received on or before March 15, 2006. ADDRESSES: Written data or comments should be submitted to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Chief, Endangered Species, Ecological Services, 911 NE. 11th Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97232– rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with NOTICES VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:38 Feb 10, 2006 Jkt 208001 Permit No. TE–115370 Applicant: Gage Dayton, Moss Landing, California. The applicant requests a permit to take (harass by survey, capture, handle, and release) the Santa Cruz long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum croceum) and the California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense) in conjunction with surveys in Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties in California for the purpose of enhancing their survival. Permit No. TE–115373 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SUMMARY: 4181 (telephone: 503–231–2063; fax: 503–231–6243). Please refer to the respective permit number for each application when submitting comments. All comments received, including names and addresses, will become part of the official administrative record and may be made available to the public. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Documents and other information submitted with these applications are available for review, subject to the requirements of the Privacy Act and Freedom of Information Act, by any party who submits a written request for a copy of such documents to the address above. Please refer to the respective permit number for each application when requesting copies of documents. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following applicants have applied for a scientific research permit to conduct certain activities with endangered species pursuant to section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (we) solicits review and comment from local, State, and Federal agencies, and the public on the following permit requests. Applicant: Darin Busby, San Diego, California. The applicant requests a permit to take (capture and collect and kill) the Conservancy fairy shrimp (Branchinecta conservatio), the longhorn fairy shrimp (Branchinecta longiantenna), the vernal pool tadpole shrimp (Lepidurus packardi), the Riverside fairy shrimp (Streptocephalus wootoni), and the San Diego fairy shrimp (Branchinecta sandiegonensis), and take (survey by pursuit) the Quino checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha quino) in conjunction with surveys throughout the range of each species in California for the purpose of enhancing their survival. 7563 The applicant requests a permit to take (capture and collect and kill) the Conservancy fairy shrimp (Branchinecta conservatio), the longhorn fairy shrimp (Branchinecta longiantenna), the vernal pool tadpole shrimp (Lepidurus packardi), the Riverside fairy shrimp (Streptocephalus wootoni), and the San Diego fairy shrimp (Branchinecta sandiegonensis) in conjunction with surveys throughout the range of each species in California for the purpose of enhancing their survival. Permit No. TE–797999 Applicant: Merkel & Associates, Inc., San Diego, California. The permittee requests an amendment to take (harass by survey, tag, collect tissue, mark by toe-clipping, and release) the desert slender salamander (Batrachoseps aridus) and the arroyo southwestern toad (Bufo microscaphus californicus), take (harass by survey, capture, handle, collect, release) the unarmored threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus williamsoni), take (harass by survey, capture, handle, and release) the tidewater goby (Eucyclogobius newberryi), take (locate and monitor nests) the least Bell’s vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus), and take (locate and monitor nests, capture, handle, weigh, band, and release) the California least tern (Sterna antillarum browni) and the light-footed clapper rail (Rallus longirostris levipes) in conjunction with surveys throughout the range of each species in California for the purpose of enhancing their survival. Permit No. TE–117075 Applicant: Richard Stabler, Santa Rosa, California. The applicant requests a permit to take (harass by survey, capture, handle, and release) the California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense) and the California freshwater shrimp (Syncaris pacifica) in conjunction with surveys in Sonoma County, California for the purpose of enhancing their survival. Permit No. TE–795934 Applicant: Jones and Stokes Associates, Inc., Sacramento, California. The permittee requests an amendment to take (harass by survey, capture, handle, and release) the California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense) in conjunction with surveys throughout its range in California for the purpose of enhancing its survival. Permit No. TE–115725 Permit No. TE–117947 Applicant: Ellen Howard, San Diego, California. Applicant: Kevin B. Clark, San Diego, California. PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\13FEN1.SGM 13FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 29 (Monday, February 13, 2006)]
[Notices]
[Pages 7562-7563]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E6-1947]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service


Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan for Sherburne National 
Wildlife Refuge, Sherburne County, Minnesota

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of availability.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces that the Final 
Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) is available for Sherburne 
National Wildlife Refuge, Minnesota.
    The CCP was prepared pursuant to the National Wildlife Refuge 
System Administration Act of 1966, as amended by the National Wildlife 
Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, and the National Environmental 
Policy Act of 1969. Goals and objectives in the CCP describe how the 
agency intends to manage the refuge over the next 15 years.

ADDRESSES: Copies of the Final CCP are available on compact disk or 
hard copy. You may access and download a copy via the planning Web site 
at http://www.fws.gov/midwest/planning/sherburne/index.html or you may 
obtain a copy by writing to the following address: U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge, 17076 293rd Ave., 
Zimmerman, MN 55398.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anne Sittauer, at (763) 389-3323.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The 30,575-acre Sherburne National Wildlife 
is located in central Minnesota at the juncture of the northern boreal 
forest, the eastern deciduous forest, and the tallgrass prairie. It was 
established in 1965 under the general authority of the Migratory Bird 
Conservation Act of 1929 (16 U.S.C. 715d). The Refuge attracts over 230 
species of birds each year to its diverse habitats. Of these, over 120 
are known to nest in the area. The Refuge wetlands provide habitat for 
about 30 nesting pairs of Greater Sandhill Cranes and serve as a 
staging area for thousands of cranes during fall migration. During fall 
and spring migration, the Refuge wetlands also support thousands of 
waterfowl.
    The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966, as 
amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 
(16 U.S.C. 668dd-668ee et seq.), requires the Service to develop a CCP 
for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose in developing CCPs is to 
provide refuge managers with a 15-year strategy for

[[Page 7563]]

achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the 
National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of 
fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and Service 
policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction for 
conserving wildlife and their habitats, the CCP identifies wildlife-
dependent recreational opportunities available to the public, including 
opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and 
photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will 
review and update these CCPs at least every 15 years in accordance with 
the National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966, as 
amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, 
and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321-
4370d).
    Management of the refuge for the next 15 years will focus on: (1) 
Changes in the water impoundment system and upland management to create 
a diversity of wetland types and historic upland plant communities; (2) 
increased opportunities for all types of wildlife-dependent recreation; 
and (3) outreach, private lands, and partnership activities that will 
emphasize natural processes, including native habitat restoration and 
conservation, to form ecologically functioning connections to and from 
the Refuge.

    Dated: November 23, 2005.
Robyn Thorson,
Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ft. Snelling, 
Minnesota.
 [FR Doc. E6-1947 Filed 2-10-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P