Notice of Inventory Completion: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 76864-76865 [E5-7886]

Download as PDF 76864 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 248 / Wednesday, December 28, 2005 / Notices Other officials of the National Park Service and the Department of the Interior may address the Board, and other miscellaneous topics and reports may be covered. The order of the agenda may be changed, if necessary, to accommodate travel schedules or for other reasons. The Board meeting will be open to the public. Space and facilities to accommodate the public are limited and attendees will be accommodated on a first-come basis. Anyone may file with the Board a written statement concerning matters to be discussed. The Board also may permit attendees to address the Board, but may restrict the length of the presentations, as necessary to allow the Board to complete its agenda within the allotted time. Anyone who wishes further information concerning the meeting, or who wishes to submit a written statement, may contact Mr. Loran Fraser, Chief, Office of Policy, National Park Service; 1849 C Street, NW., Room 7250; Washington, DC 20240; telephone 202–208–7456. Draft minutes of the meeting will be available for public inspection about 12 weeks after the meeting, in room 7252, Main Interior Building, 1849 C Street, NW., Washington, DC. or faxed comments should be submitted by January 12, 2006. John W. Roberts, Acting Chief, National Register/National Historic Landmarks Program. ARIZONA Maricopa County Sacred Heart Home for the Aged, 1110 N. 16th St., Phoenix, 05001548 MISSISSIPPI Yazoo County Afro-American Sons and Daughters Hospital, 8th St. and Webster Ave., Yazoo City, 05001558 MISSOURI Franklin County St. Albans Farms Stone Barn, 3476 St. Albans Rd., St. Albans, 05001550 Oregon County Greer Mill, W. Side, MO 19, 10 mi. N of Alton, Alton, 05001551 St. Louis Independent City Union Depot Railroad Co. Building, (South St. Louis Historic Working and Middle Class Streetcar Suburbs MPS), 2727 S. Jefferson Ave., St. Louis (Independent City), 05001549 NORTH CAROLINA Dated: December 19, 2005. Bernard Fagan, Deputy Chief, Office of Policy. [FR Doc. E5–7891 Filed 12–27–05; 8:45 am] Rutherford County BILLING CODE 4312–52–P OREGON Washburn Historic District (Boundary Increase), 1037 Gun Club Rd., Bostic, 05001552 Hood River County DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions wwhite on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES National Park Service First National Bank of Hood River, 304 Oak St., Hood River, 05001555 Heilbronner Block, 100–118 Third St., Hood River, 05001554 Multnomah County Nominations for the following properties being considered for listing or related actions in the National Register were received by the National Park Service before December 17, 2005. Pursuant to § 60.13 of 36 CFR part 60 written comments concerning the significance of these properties under the National Register criteria for evaluation may be forwarded by United States Postal Service, to the National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service, 1849 C St., NW., 2280, Washington, DC 20240; by all other carriers, National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service, 1201 Eye St., NW., 8th floor, Washington, DC 20005; or by fax, 202–371–6447. Written VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:37 Dec 27, 2005 Jkt 208001 Lombard Automobile Buildings, 123–35 NW Broadway;134 NW 8th Ave., Portland, 05001553 Ruby, Alfred C. and Nettie, House, 211 NE 39th Ave., Portland, 05001559 Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway Steam Locomotive, Roundhouse, UPRPR’s Brooklyn Yard (SE Portland), Portland, 05001557 TENNESSEE Shelby County Gayoso—Peabody Historic District (Boundary Decrease), Roughly along S. Main St. from McCall Place to Monroe Ave., Memphis, 05001556 [FR Doc. E5–7994 Filed 12–27–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–51–P PO 00000 Frm 00130 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK. The human remains were removed from Crittendon, Mississippi, and Poinsett Counties, AR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History and Oklahoma State Archeologist professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. In 1933, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from Cummin’s Place, also called Cumming’s Place (Arkansas–7/ 130 and 7/131), in Poinsett County, AR, by Frank Newkumet. Mr. Newkumet loaned the human remains to the Oklahoma Museum of Natural History (now the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History) from 1933 until 1947. The museum purchased the collection from Mr. Newkumet in 1947. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. A deer bone found with the human remains at Arkansas–7/130 was not located during the inventory process. In 1933, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from Upper Nodena Place (Arkansas–7/137 and 7/138) in Mississippi County, AR, by Frank Newkumet. Mr. Newkumet loaned the human remains to the Oklahoma Museum of Natural History from 1933 until 1947. The museum purchased the collection from Mr. Newkumet in 1947. No known individuals were identified. E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1 wwhite on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 248 / Wednesday, December 28, 2005 / Notices No associated funerary objects are present. In 1959, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from the Banks site (Arkansas– 31A) in Crittendon County, AR, by Greg Perino. Mr. Perino donated the human remains to the Oklahoma Museum of Natural History later that same year. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Cummin’s Place, Upper Nodena Place, and Banks sites indicate that the human remains are Native American and were probably buried during the Parkin phase of the Mississippian nucleation horizon (A.D. 1350–1650). The Parkin phase is characterized by Nodena leaf-shaped arrow points, Madison arrow points, pipe drills, chisels, adzes, use of basalt, conch shell beads, mushroom shaped beads, ear plugs, copper disks, discoidals, catlinite pipes, Parkin punctate and Barton incised pottery, Mississippian Plain pottery, effigy forms such as, head pots, compound vessels, and occasionally red and white Nodena ware. Although many of these types of artifacts were found at the sites, none of the artifacts besides the missing deer bone are considered associated funerary objects because they were not found in a burial context nor is there any other information that attests to their being from a burial context. Many of the Parkin phase artifact traits continued to be practiced by people later identified as Quapaw. European documentation concerning the geographical range of the Quapaw people supports their presence in the northeastern part of Arkansas. Present-day descendants of the Quapaw people are members of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Officials of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of seven individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Ellen Censky, Director, Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma, 2401 Chautauqua, Norman, OK 73072, telephone (405) 325–4712, before January 27, 2006. Repatriation of VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:37 Dec 27, 2005 Jkt 208001 the human remains to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: December 3, 2005. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E5–7886 Filed 12–27–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service, Interior. Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is hereby given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sold responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. The 12 cultural items are 7 beaded necklaces (beads include glass trade beads, shell beads, and copper beads), 1 bracelet, 3 sets of pipe fragments, and 1 piece of twine. At an unknown date, the 12 cultural items were removed from a small island just upriver from Blalock Island in the lower Columbia River, Benton County, WA, by Mr. John Tomaske, an archaeology graduate student of the University of Washington. In 1960, the cultural items were donated to the University of Washington Department of Anthropology, and subsequently transferred to the Burke Museum and accessioned in 1973 (Burke Accn. #1973–8). Accession information indicated the presence of burials at the site. According to Mr. Tomaske, the PO 00000 Frm 00131 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 76865 burials had previously been disturbed and exhibited evidence of cremation. The human remains are not in the possession of the Burke Museum. The small island just upriver from Blalock Island described in museum records could be Cook’s Island, which was formerly recorded as containing cremation burials. Archaeological evidence for Cook’s Island supports the presence of cremation burials. Cremation and burial on islands in the Columbia River were customary practices of the Umatilla. It was also the practice of the Umatilla that individuals were buried with many of their personal belongings. The area surrounding Blalock Island was heavily utilized by the Umatilla, including ama’amapa, which served as a habitation area, burial site, and stronghold from enemies. On Blalock Island, and along the Washington side of the Columbia River, the Umatilla had a permanent camp, Yep-po-luc-sha (or Yep-po-kuc-sha), as well as a fishing area. Burial practices and funerary objects described are consistent with historic practices of the present-day Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. The area surrounding Blalock Island is within the aboriginal territory of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon and the land claims boundaries of the Indian Claims Commission decision of 1960. Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 12 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Dr. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195–3010, telephone (206) 685–2282, before January 27, 2006. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. E:\FR\FM\28DEN1.SGM 28DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 248 (Wednesday, December 28, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 76864-76865]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E5-7886]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of 
Natural History, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma, 
Norman, OK. The human remains were removed from Crittendon, 
Mississippi, and Poinsett Counties, AR.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Sam 
Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History and Oklahoma State 
Archeologist professional staff in consultation with representatives of 
the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma.
    In 1933, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from Cummin's Place, also called Cumming's Place 
(Arkansas-7/130 and 7/131), in Poinsett County, AR, by Frank Newkumet. 
Mr. Newkumet loaned the human remains to the Oklahoma Museum of Natural 
History (now the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History) from 
1933 until 1947. The museum purchased the collection from Mr. Newkumet 
in 1947. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present. A deer bone found with the human remains at 
Arkansas-7/130 was not located during the inventory process.
    In 1933, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from Upper Nodena Place (Arkansas-7/137 and 7/138) in 
Mississippi County, AR, by Frank Newkumet. Mr. Newkumet loaned the 
human remains to the Oklahoma Museum of Natural History from 1933 until 
1947. The museum purchased the collection from Mr. Newkumet in 1947. No 
known individuals were identified.

[[Page 76865]]

No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1959, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
were removed from the Banks site (Arkansas-31A) in Crittendon County, 
AR, by Greg Perino. Mr. Perino donated the human remains to the 
Oklahoma Museum of Natural History later that same year. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Diagnostic artifacts found at the Cummin's Place, Upper Nodena 
Place, and Banks sites indicate that the human remains are Native 
American and were probably buried during the Parkin phase of the 
Mississippian nucleation horizon (A.D. 1350-1650). The Parkin phase is 
characterized by Nodena leaf-shaped arrow points, Madison arrow points, 
pipe drills, chisels, adzes, use of basalt, conch shell beads, mushroom 
shaped beads, ear plugs, copper disks, discoidals, catlinite pipes, 
Parkin punctate and Barton incised pottery, Mississippian Plain 
pottery, effigy forms such as, head pots, compound vessels, and 
occasionally red and white Nodena ware. Although many of these types of 
artifacts were found at the sites, none of the artifacts besides the 
missing deer bone are considered associated funerary objects because 
they were not found in a burial context nor is there any other 
information that attests to their being from a burial context. Many of 
the Parkin phase artifact traits continued to be practiced by people 
later identified as Quapaw. European documentation concerning the 
geographical range of the Quapaw people supports their presence in the 
northeastern part of Arkansas. Present-day descendants of the Quapaw 
people are members of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma.
    Officials of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of seven individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of 
Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 
(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be 
reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the 
Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Ellen Censky, Director, Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, 
University of Oklahoma, 2401 Chautauqua, Norman, OK 73072, telephone 
(405) 325-4712, before January 27, 2006. Repatriation of the human 
remains to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma may proceed after that 
date if no additional claimants come forward.
    Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History is responsible for 
notifying the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma that this notice has 
been published.

    Dated: December 3, 2005.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E5-7886 Filed 12-27-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S