Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, 61835-61837 [05-21330]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 206 / Wednesday, October 26, 2005 / Notices will expire on July 24, 2006, unless extended. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has filed an application to extend PLO No. 6619. This withdrawal was made to allow management of the following described land as part of the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge: Fourth Principal Meridian T. 18 N., R. 2 E., Secs. 1 and 12. T. 18 N., R. 3 E., Secs. 6, 7, 8, 9, 15, and 16 (Those parts lying south and west of Grand Dike Road); sec. 17. The area described contains 4,107 acres in Juneau County. The legal description above has been corrected to include only those parts of sec. 16 in T. 18 N., R. 3 E., lying south and west of Grand Dike Road. There is no change in the total acres. The purpose of the proposed extension is to continue the withdrawal created by PLO No. 6619 for an additional 20-year term to allow the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to continue to manage the land as part of the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge. There are no suitable alternative sites since the lands described herein contain the natural resources and improvements of interest for protection. No water rights will be needed to fulfill the purpose of the requested withdrawal. For a period of 90 days from the date of publication of this notice, all persons who wish to submit comments, suggestions, or objections in connection with the proposed withdrawal may present their views in writing to the State Director of the BLMEastern States. Comments, including names and street addresses of respondents, will be available for public review at the BLMEastern States, Milwaukee Field Office, 626 E. Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 200, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202 during regular business hours 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays. Individual respondents may request confidentiality. If you wish to withhold your name or address from public review or from disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act, you must state this prominently at the beginning of your comments. Such requests will be honored to the extent allowed by law. All submissions from organizations or businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives or officials of organizations or businesses, will be made available for public inspection in their entirety. Notice is hereby given that an opportunity for a public meeting is afforded in connection with the VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:26 Oct 25, 2005 Jkt 208001 proposed withdrawal extension. All interested persons who desire a public meeting for the purpose of being heard on the proposed withdrawal extension must submit a written request to the State Director, BLM-Eastern States within 90 days from the date of publication of this notice. If the authorized officer determines that a public meeting will be held, a notice of the time and place will be published in the Federal Register at least 30 days before the scheduled date of the meeting. This withdrawal extension proposal will be processed in accordance with the regulations set forth in 43 CFR 2310.4. (Authority: 43 CFR 2310.3–1) Dated: October 19, 2005. Ann B. Aldrich, Acting State Director, Eastern States. [FR Doc. 05–21394 Filed 10–25–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Yakima and Kittitas Counties, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61835 Hoh Indian Tribe of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe of Washington; Lower Elwha Tribal Community of the Lower Elwha Reservation, Washington; Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation, Washington; Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot Reservation, Washington; Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation, Washington; Nooksack Indian Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington; Quileute Tribe of the Quileute Reservation, Washington; Quinault Tribe of the Quinault Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; Shoalwater Bay Tribe of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation, Washington; Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington; Squaxin Island Tribe of the Squaxin Island Reservation, Washington; Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington; Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington; Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington; and Upper Skagit Indian Tribe of Washington. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals were collected from a site on the north side of River Road, east of the North and South Branch Road, in the vicinity of Tampico, Yakima County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known individuals were identified. The 31 associated funerary objects are 1 bone point, 25 dentalium shells (10 of them engraved), 4 pieces of charcoal, and 1 bone. These individuals have been identified as Native American based on geographic and archeological evidence. The human remains were recovered from a volcanic ash knoll. The lack of postcontact artifacts, the presence of incised dentalium shells, and the form of interment in a river valley location suggest a late precontact date for the remains. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected from a site in the vicinity of North Yakima, east of the mouth of the Naches River, north side of a hill, Yakima County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individual has been identified as Native American based on geographic evidence and burial practice. The use of E:\FR\FM\26OCN1.SGM 26OCN1 61836 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 206 / Wednesday, October 26, 2005 / Notices a rockslide grave suggests a late precontact date for the remains. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected from the James McWhirter 20 Acre Farm, in the vicinity of North Yakima, Yakima County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. The site is 12 miles up the Naches River along the north side, on the crest of a foothill terrace. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a shell disk. The individual has been identified as Native American based on geographic evidence and burial practice. The lack of post-contact artifacts, the presence of a cut disk shell bead, and the river valley location of the bluff pebble grave suggest a late precontact date for the human remains. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected from a site at Priest Rapids, Kittitas County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. The site is along the western bank of the Columbia River, 5 miles south of Mr. Craig’s house. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individual has been identified as Native American based on geographic evidence and burial practice. The remains were found in a sand grave covered with flat river stones. The location of the grave in a river valley suggests a late precontact date for the remains. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected from a site at Priest Rapids, Kittitas County(?), WA, by Harlan I. Smith. The site is at the edge of the Columbia River, 12 miles north of Mr. Craig’s house. No known individual was identified. The four associated funerary objects are one stone mortar and three pestles. The individual has been identified as Native American based on geographic evidence and burial practice. The remains were found in a sand grave covered with river cobbles. The location of the grave in a river valley suggests a late precontact date for the remains. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected from a site 10 miles north of the head of Priest Rapids on the Columbia River, 8 miles above Mr. Craig’s house, Kittitas County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individual has been identified as Native American based on the talus VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:26 Oct 25, 2005 Jkt 208001 slope inhumation, a form of burial consistent with the postcontact practices of Sahaptin speakers of the area. The presence of cedar slabs in the grave also suggests a postcontact date for these remains. The cedar slabs are not part of the museum’s collection. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were collected from the east side of an escarpment running south of the Columbia River, near the head of Priest Rapids, 2 miles southwest of Mr. Craig’s house, Kittitas County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are one roll of birch bark and one piece of stitched rush matting. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on the kinds of associated funerary objects and burial type. The remains were found interred in a talus slope, a form of burial consistent with the postcontact practices of Sahaptin speakers of the area. The presence of upright wood posts, bark, and matting in the grave also suggests a postcontact date for the remains. The wood posts are not part of the museum’s collection. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of 10 individuals were collected from Mr. Bull’s farm, 7 miles south of Ellensburg, Kittitas County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. The site is east of Cherry Creek in the western extension of the Saddle Mountains. No known individuals were identified. The 1295 associated funerary objects are 5 pieces of leather, 109 shells, 28 glass beads, 3 iron bracelets, 1 perforated bone disk, 1 freshwater shell fragment, 1 reed mat fragment, 1 reed mat fragment with hide and copper and shell beads, 1 piece of animal fur, 3 pieces of matting, 1098 copper, glass, and shell beads strung on fiber and leather, 4 shell ornaments (including 1 nose ornament), 2 copper pendants, 4 metal bracelets, 5 rodent teeth, 1 copper disk pendant, 1 wood knot hole, 1 piece of iron, 1 fragment of fabric incorporating feathers and fur, 1 copper ornament, 1 brass pendant with copper head, 1 metal pendant with leather thong, 1 piece of shell, 13 iron cones, 2 iron pendants, 2 antler fragments, 1 triangular copper object, 2 shell pendants, and 1 unidentified shell object. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on the kinds of associated funerary objects and type of burial. The presence of postcontact funerary objects and the use of talus slope for interment suggest a postcontact date for these remains. PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected from a site on the south side of Yakima Ridge, Yakima County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. The site is 1 mile east of the confluence of the Yakima and Naches Rivers. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. This individual has been identified as Native American based on geographic information and burial type. The remains were found in a talus slope, which suggests a postcontact age. The presence of rush matting in the grave also suggests a postcontact date for the remains. The rush matting is not part of the museum’s collection. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals were collected from a site on the north side of the Naches River, 1/2 mile above the confluence of the Yakima and Naches Rivers, Yakima County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known individuals were identified. The 91 associated funerary objects are 4 wooden pieces of a fire drill, 20 dog or wolf bones, 1 partial decorated bow, 3 basket fragments, 1 fragment of rush mat, approximately 50 copper tubes and beads, 4 bone tubes, 1 bone point, 1 perforated stone cylinder, 3 stone flakes, and 3 projectile points. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on the type of associated funerary objects and the form of burial. The two graves were talus slope interments of a form used by the postcontact Shahaptin speakers who occupied the area. The associated funerary objects also suggest a postcontact date for the remains. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were collected from a site in the vicinity of Selah, Yakima County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on the form of burial. The graves were talus slope interments of a form used by the postcontact Sahaptin speakers who occupied the area. The presence of wood in both graves, and leather and desiccated soft tissue in one grave may suggest a postcontact date for the remains. The wood and leather are not part of the museum’s collection. In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected from a site 2 miles northeast of the mouth of the Naches, south of the Yakima River in Yakima County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. E:\FR\FM\26OCN1.SGM 26OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 206 / Wednesday, October 26, 2005 / Notices The individual has been identified as Native American based on the form of burial. The grave was a talus slope interment of a form used by the postcontact Sahaptin speakers who occupied the area. The presence of pieces of cedar in the grave suggests a postcontact date for the remains. The pieces of cedar are not part of the museum’s collection. The geographic location of all of the sites described above is consistent with the early postcontact territory of Sahaptin speakers who are ancestors of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. The burial type described by Mr. Smith for all of the remains reported here is consistent with the late precontact and postcontact burial practices of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. Experts in Oregon Plateau archeology suggest that there has been cultural continuity from late precontact to the postcontact period in this area. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 30 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 1,424 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Nell Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024–5192, telephone (212) 769–5837, before November 25, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:26 Oct 25, 2005 Jkt 208001 Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; Hoh Indian Tribe of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe of Washington; Lower Elwha Tribal Community of the Lower Elwha Reservation, Washington; Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation, Washington; Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot Reservation, Washington; Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation, Washington; Nooksack Indian Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington; Quileute Tribe of the Quileute Reservation, Washington; Quinault Tribe of the Quinault Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; Shoalwater Bay Tribe of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation, Washington; Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington; Squaxin Island Tribe of the Squaxin Island Reservation, Washington; Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington; Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington; Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington; and Upper Skagit Indian Tribe of Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: September 30, 2005 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–21330 Filed 10–25–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM, and Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM, and in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, that meets PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61837 the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary object’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. The cultural item was removed from the Gila National Forest, Catron County, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. The cultural item is a small San Francisco Red pottery jar. A detailed assessment of the cultural item was made by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest and the Field Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with the Hopi Tribe, Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. In 1954, the cultural item was removed from Valley View Pueblo in the Gila National Forest, Catron County, NM, during legally authorized excavations and collected by Dr. Paul S. Martin of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. In August 2005, the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, found an unassociated funerary object among its collections that had been taken from Gila National Forest, Catron County, NM, by Dr. Martin. Unassociated funerary objects removed from Gila National Forest, Catron County, NM, were previously published in the Federal Register of June 1, 2005, FR Doc. 05–10805, page 31510, and in a subsequently corrected Notice of Intent to Repatriate published in the Federal Register on August 3, 2005, FR Doc. 05–15322, page 44687. Material culture, architecture, and site organization indicate that Valley View Pueblo is an Upland Mogollon site occupied between A.D. 550 and 1150. The territory of the Upland Mogollon stretched from south-central Arizona to south-central New Mexico. The Upland Mogollon territories are claimed, currently inhabited, or used by the Hopi Tribe, Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Most archeological evidence linking Upland Mogollon to present-day Indian tribes relies on ceramics that suggest cultural connections between these groups. Present-day descendants of the Upland Mogollon are the Hopi Tribe, Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Oral traditions preserved in the ethnographic literature and presented by representatives of the Hopi Tribe, E:\FR\FM\26OCN1.SGM 26OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 206 (Wednesday, October 26, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 61835-61837]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-21330]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural 
History, New York, NY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, 
New York, NY. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed from Yakima and Kittitas Counties, WA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American 
Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, 
Washington; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, 
Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of 
Oregon; Hoh Indian Tribe of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; 
Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe of Washington; Lower Elwha Tribal Community 
of the Lower Elwha Reservation, Washington; Lummi Tribe of the Lummi 
Reservation, Washington; Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian 
Reservation, Washington; Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot 
Reservation, Washington; Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually 
Reservation, Washington; Nooksack Indian Tribe of Washington; Port 
Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; 
Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington; Quileute Tribe 
of the Quileute Reservation, Washington; Quinault Tribe of the Quinault 
Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; Shoalwater 
Bay Tribe of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation, Washington; 
Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington; 
Squaxin Island Tribe of the Squaxin Island Reservation, Washington; 
Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington; Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish 
Reservation, Washington; Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, 
Washington; and Upper Skagit Indian Tribe of Washington.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals 
were collected from a site on the north side of River Road, east of the 
North and South Branch Road, in the vicinity of Tampico, Yakima County, 
WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known individuals were identified. The 31 
associated funerary objects are 1 bone point, 25 dentalium shells (10 
of them engraved), 4 pieces of charcoal, and 1 bone.
    These individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
geographic and archeological evidence. The human remains were recovered 
from a volcanic ash knoll. The lack of postcontact artifacts, the 
presence of incised dentalium shells, and the form of interment in a 
river valley location suggest a late precontact date for the remains.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected from a site in the vicinity of North Yakima, east of the 
mouth of the Naches River, north side of a hill, Yakima County, WA, by 
Harlan I. Smith. No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on 
geographic evidence and burial practice. The use of

[[Page 61836]]

a rockslide grave suggests a late precontact date for the remains.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected from the James McWhirter 20 Acre Farm, in the vicinity 
of North Yakima, Yakima County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. The site is 12 
miles up the Naches River along the north side, on the crest of a 
foothill terrace. No known individual was identified. The one 
associated funerary object is a shell disk.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on 
geographic evidence and burial practice. The lack of post-contact 
artifacts, the presence of a cut disk shell bead, and the river valley 
location of the bluff pebble grave suggest a late precontact date for 
the human remains.

    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected from a site at Priest Rapids, Kittitas County, WA, by 
Harlan I. Smith. The site is along the western bank of the Columbia 
River, 5 miles south of Mr. Craig's house. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on 
geographic evidence and burial practice. The remains were found in a 
sand grave covered with flat river stones. The location of the grave in 
a river valley suggests a late precontact date for the remains.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected from a site at Priest Rapids, Kittitas County(?), WA, by 
Harlan I. Smith. The site is at the edge of the Columbia River, 12 
miles north of Mr. Craig's house. No known individual was identified. 
The four associated funerary objects are one stone mortar and three 
pestles.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on 
geographic evidence and burial practice. The remains were found in a 
sand grave covered with river cobbles. The location of the grave in a 
river valley suggests a late precontact date for the remains.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected from a site 10 miles north of the head of Priest Rapids 
on the Columbia River, 8 miles above Mr. Craig's house, Kittitas 
County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on the 
talus slope inhumation, a form of burial consistent with the 
postcontact practices of Sahaptin speakers of the area. The presence of 
cedar slabs in the grave also suggests a postcontact date for these 
remains. The cedar slabs are not part of the museum's collection.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were collected from the east side of an escarpment running south of the 
Columbia River, near the head of Priest Rapids, 2 miles southwest of 
Mr. Craig's house, Kittitas County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known 
individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are 
one roll of birch bark and one piece of stitched rush matting.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the kinds of associated funerary objects and burial type. The remains 
were found interred in a talus slope, a form of burial consistent with 
the postcontact practices of Sahaptin speakers of the area. The 
presence of upright wood posts, bark, and matting in the grave also 
suggests a postcontact date for the remains. The wood posts are not 
part of the museum's collection.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of 10 individuals 
were collected from Mr. Bull's farm, 7 miles south of Ellensburg, 
Kittitas County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. The site is east of Cherry 
Creek in the western extension of the Saddle Mountains. No known 
individuals were identified. The 1295 associated funerary objects are 5 
pieces of leather, 109 shells, 28 glass beads, 3 iron bracelets, 1 
perforated bone disk, 1 freshwater shell fragment, 1 reed mat fragment, 
1 reed mat fragment with hide and copper and shell beads, 1 piece of 
animal fur, 3 pieces of matting, 1098 copper, glass, and shell beads 
strung on fiber and leather, 4 shell ornaments (including 1 nose 
ornament), 2 copper pendants, 4 metal bracelets, 5 rodent teeth, 1 
copper disk pendant, 1 wood knot hole, 1 piece of iron, 1 fragment of 
fabric incorporating feathers and fur, 1 copper ornament, 1 brass 
pendant with copper head, 1 metal pendant with leather thong, 1 piece 
of shell, 13 iron cones, 2 iron pendants, 2 antler fragments, 1 
triangular copper object, 2 shell pendants, and 1 unidentified shell 
object.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the kinds of associated funerary objects and type of burial. The 
presence of postcontact funerary objects and the use of talus slope for 
interment suggest a postcontact date for these remains.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected from a site on the south side of Yakima Ridge, Yakima 
County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. The site is 1 mile east of the 
confluence of the Yakima and Naches Rivers. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    This individual has been identified as Native American based on 
geographic information and burial type. The remains were found in a 
talus slope, which suggests a postcontact age. The presence of rush 
matting in the grave also suggests a postcontact date for the remains. 
The rush matting is not part of the museum's collection.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals 
were collected from a site on the north side of the Naches River, 1/2 
mile above the confluence of the Yakima and Naches Rivers, Yakima 
County, WA, by Harlan I. Smith. No known individuals were identified. 
The 91 associated funerary objects are 4 wooden pieces of a fire drill, 
20 dog or wolf bones, 1 partial decorated bow, 3 basket fragments, 1 
fragment of rush mat, approximately 50 copper tubes and beads, 4 bone 
tubes, 1 bone point, 1 perforated stone cylinder, 3 stone flakes, and 3 
projectile points.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the type of associated funerary objects and the form of burial. The two 
graves were talus slope interments of a form used by the postcontact 
Shahaptin speakers who occupied the area. The associated funerary 
objects also suggest a postcontact date for the remains.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were collected from a site in the vicinity of Selah, Yakima County, WA, 
by Harlan I. Smith. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the form of burial. The graves were talus slope interments of a form 
used by the postcontact Sahaptin speakers who occupied the area. The 
presence of wood in both graves, and leather and desiccated soft tissue 
in one grave may suggest a postcontact date for the remains. The wood 
and leather are not part of the museum's collection.
    In 1903, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected from a site 2 miles northeast of the mouth of the 
Naches, south of the Yakima River in Yakima County, WA, by Harlan I. 
Smith. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.

[[Page 61837]]

    The individual has been identified as Native American based on the 
form of burial. The grave was a talus slope interment of a form used by 
the postcontact Sahaptin speakers who occupied the area. The presence 
of pieces of cedar in the grave suggests a postcontact date for the 
remains. The pieces of cedar are not part of the museum's collection.
    The geographic location of all of the sites described above is 
consistent with the early postcontact territory of Sahaptin speakers 
who are ancestors of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama 
Nation, Washington. The burial type described by Mr. Smith for all of 
the remains reported here is consistent with the late precontact and 
postcontact burial practices of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of 
the Yakama Nation, Washington. Experts in Oregon Plateau archeology 
suggest that there has been cultural continuity from late precontact to 
the postcontact period in this area.
    Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of 30 individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History 
also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 1,424 
objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the American 
Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 
3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be 
reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of 
the Yakama Nation, Washington.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Nell Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, 
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, 
New York, NY 10024-5192, telephone (212) 769-5837, before November 25, 
2005. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects 
to the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington 
may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying 
the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, Washington; 
Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; 
Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; Hoh 
Indian Tribe of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; Jamestown 
S'Klallam Tribe of Washington; Lower Elwha Tribal Community of the 
Lower Elwha Reservation, Washington; Lummi Tribe of the Lummi 
Reservation, Washington; Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian 
Reservation, Washington; Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot 
Reservation, Washington; Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually 
Reservation, Washington; Nooksack Indian Tribe of Washington; Port 
Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; 
Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington; Quileute Tribe 
of the Quileute Reservation, Washington; Quinault Tribe of the Quinault 
Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; Shoalwater 
Bay Tribe of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation, Washington; 
Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington; 
Squaxin Island Tribe of the Squaxin Island Reservation, Washington; 
Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington; Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish 
Reservation, Washington; Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, 
Washington; and Upper Skagit Indian Tribe of Washington that this 
notice has been published.

    Dated: September 30, 2005
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 05-21330 Filed 10-25-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S