Shasta Lake Water Resources Investigation, Shasta and Tehama Counties, CA, 58744-58746 [05-20169]

Download as PDF 58744 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 194 / Friday, October 7, 2005 / Notices individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of Pacific Lutheran University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact David R. Huelsbeck, Anthropology Department, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447, telephone (253) 535–7196, before November 7, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains to the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Pacific Lutheran University is responsible for notifying the the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Cowlitz Indian Tribe, Washington; Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot Reservation, Washington; Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation, Washington; and Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: September 1, 2005. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–20199 Filed 10–6–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation [FES 05–29] Humboldt Project Conveyance, Pershing, Churchill and Lander Counties, NV Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability of the final environmental impact statement (FEIS). AGENCY: SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act 102(2) of 1969, the Bureau of Reclamation has prepared a FEIS for the Humboldt Project Conveyance, Pershing, Churchill, and Lander Counties, Nevada. The FEIS assesses the impacts of conveying title of the Humboldt Project (Project) and associated lands to the Pershing County Water Conservation District (PCWCD), State of Nevada, Lander County and Pershing County. VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:27 Oct 06, 2005 Jkt 208001 The action is needed to comply with Title VIII of Pub. L. 107–282 which directs Reclamation to transfer title of the Project to the entities listed above. DATES: Reclamation will not make a decision on the proposed action until at least 30 days after release of the FEIS. At the end of the 30-day period, Reclamation will complete a Record of Decision (ROD). The ROD will state the action that will be implemented and will discuss all factors leading to the decision. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request a copy of the document, please call (775) 884–8352, or write or e-mail Caryn Huntt DeCarlo, Bureau of Reclamation, Lahontan Basin Area Office, 705 N Plaza, Room 320, Carson City, NV 89701, or e-mail chunttdecarlo@mp.usbr.gov. The FEIS is accessible from the following Web site: http://www.usbr.gov/mp/nepa/ nepa_projdetails.cfm?Project_ID=550. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement was published in the Federal Register on February 26, 2003. A Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) was published in the Federal Register on January 28, 2005 (70 FR 4149). The written comment period on the DEIS ended on March 28, 2005. The FEIS contains responses to all comments received and reflects comments and any additional information received during the review period. The Project is located along the Humboldt River in northwestern Nevada. Reclamation began Project construction in 1935 and in 1941 the first water was delivered to agricultural lands in the Lovelock Valley from storage in Rye Patch Reservoir. PCWCD assumed operation of the Project in 1941. PCWCD has had several Project repayment contracts with Reclamation that have all been repaid. Project features include Battle Mountain Community Pasture, Rye Patch Dam and Reservoir, and the Humboldt Sink. Battle Mountain Community Pasture, located near Battle Mountain, is approximately 30,000 acres and is managed for grazing by the PCWCD under a lease agreement with Reclamation. Rye Patch Reservoir is located 26 miles upstream from Lovelock, is 21 miles in length, and has a capacity of 190,000 acre-feet. The State of Nevada manages the recreation at the reservoir under a management agreement with Reclamation and the PCWCD. The Humboldt Sink is also part of the Project and is managed by the State of Nevada under a management agreement with Reclamation. PO 00000 Frm 00083 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Public Comment Availability Our practice is to make comments, including names and home addresses of respondents, available for public review. Individual respondents may request that we withhold their home address from public disclosure, which we will honor to the extent allowable by law. There may also be circumstances in which we would withhold a respondent’s identity from public disclosure, as allowable by law. If you wish us to withhold your name and/or address, you must state this prominently at the beginning of your comment. We will make all submissions from organizations or businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives or officials of organizations or businesses, available for public disclosure in their entirety. Dated: August 30, 2005. Kirk C. Rodgers, Regional Director, Mid-Pacific Region. [FR Doc. 05–20187 Filed 10–6–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–MN–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Shasta Lake Water Resources Investigation, Shasta and Tehama Counties, CA AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and notice of public scoping meetings. ACTION: SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Bureau of Reclamation proposes to prepare an EIS for the Shasta Lake Water Resources Investigation (SLWRI). Authorization for the investigation comes from Pub. L. 96–375, 1980; which directs the Secretary of the Interior to engage in feasibility studies related to enlarging Shasta Dam and Reservoir. Other directing legislation includes Title 34 of Pub. L. 102–575, the Central Valley Project Improvement Act and Pub. L. 108–137, the Energy and Water Development Act. In addition, enlargement of Shasta Dam was identified in the CALFED Programmatic Environmental Impact Report/Statement and Record of Decision (ROD) and in Pub. L. 108–361, the CALFED Bay-Delta authority. A series of public scoping meetings will be held to solicit public input on the scope of the environmental document, alternatives, concerns, and DATES: E:\FR\FM\07OCN1.SGM 07OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 194 / Friday, October 7, 2005 / Notices issues to be addressed in the EIS. The meeting dates are as follows: • October 24, 2005, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sacramento, CA. • October 24, 2005, 6 to 9 p.m., Concord, CA. • October 26, 2005, 1 to 4 p.m., Los Angeles, CA. • November 1, 2005, 6 to 9 p.m., Fresno, CA. • November 2, 2005, 6 to 9 p.m., Dunsmuir, CA. • November 3, 2005, 6 to 9 p.m., Red Bluff, CA. Submit written comments on or before December 6, 2005 to the address provided below. ADDRESSES: The public scoping meeting locations are: • Federal Building, 2800 Cottage Way, Rooms C–1001 and C–1002, Sacramento, CA. • Heald Conference Center, 5130 Commercial Circle, Concord, CA. • Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, 700 North Alameda Street Room 1–102, Los Angeles, CA. • Piccadilly Inn, 2305 West Shaw Avenue, in Fresno, CA. • Dunsmuir Community Building, 4835 Dunsmuir Avenue in Dunsmuir, CA. • Red Bluff Community Center, Auditorium, 1500 South Jackson. Written comments on the scope of the environmental document should be sent to: Ms. Sammie Cervantes, Bureau of Reclamation, 2800 Cottage Way, MP– 700, Sacramento CA 95825. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Donna Garcia, Reclamation Project Manager, at the above address, at 916– 978–5009, TDD 916–978–5608, or via fax at 916–978–5094 or e-mail at dgarcia@mp.usbr.gov. If special assistance is required, please contact Ms. Cervantes at 916–978–5189, TDD 916–978–5608, or via e-mail at scervantes@mp.usbr.gov no less than 5 working days prior to the meetings. Further information on the investigation, including interim results, can be found on the SLWRI Web site at http://www.usbr.gov/mp/slwri or through the above contact persons. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Constructed from 1938 to 1945, Shasta Dam serves multiple purposes including flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supplies, and hydropower generation. In addition, Shasta Lake significantly contributes to the regional economy through extensive recreational activities. Initial feasibility studies in partial response to Pub. L. 96–375 culminated in a 1988 Wrap-Up Report which concluded that enlarging Shasta Dam VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:27 Oct 06, 2005 Jkt 208001 and Reservoir could significantly increase water supply reliability, if and when water demands warranted the required financing. The current feasibility scope study primarily involving enlargement of Shasta Dam and Reservoir was reinitiated in 2000. Raising Shasta Dam is one of five surface water storage projects identified in the August 2000 CALFED ROD which includes North of Delta Off-Stream Storage, In-Delta Storage, Los Vaqueros Enlargement, and Upper San Joaquin River Basin Storage Investigation. These surface water storage projects are being developed further in separate feasibility studies. The primary study area for the SLWRI is Shasta Dam and Reservoir; tributary rivers and streams, including the upper reaches of the Sacramento River, McCloud River, Pit River, and Squaw Creek; and the Sacramento River downstream from Shasta Dam to about the Red Bluff Diversion Dam. Because of the potential influence of a Shasta Dam modification on natural resources along the Sacramento River and on programs and projects in the Central Valley, the extended study area includes other major tributaries to the Sacramento River, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, San Joaquin River basin, and service areas of the Central Valley Project (CVP) and State Water Project (SWP). Planning studies to date have focused on identifying water resources problems and needs in the primary study area, developing a set of planning objectives to help guide the remainder of the feasibility study, and formulating several initial alternatives. These three important elements of the study are summarized below. Problems and Needs Major water and related resources problems and needs identified in the primary study area include: • Anadromous Fish Restoration: The population of Chinook salmon has declined in the Central Valley. To address this salmon decline in the Sacramento River, various actions have been taken, ranging from establishing minimum flow requirements in the river to making structural changes at Shasta Dam. However, a need still exists for additional actions to benefit anadromous fish, especially in dry and critically dry water years. • Water Supply Reliability: Demand for water in California exceeds available supplies. As the population of the Central Valley grows, the need to maintain a healthy and vibrant industrial and agricultural economy will increase while the demand for an PO 00000 Frm 00084 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 58745 adequate water supply becomes more acute. • Other Resource Needs: Other identified problems and needs include the need for environmental restoration in the Shasta Lake area and downstream along the Sacramento River; the need for additional flood control along the upper Sacramento River; and growing demands for new energy sources in California and outdoor recreation in the primary study area. Planning Objectives The Problems and Needs in the study area were translated into Primary and Secondary Planning Objectives. • Primary Planning Objectives: Alternatives will be formulated to address the primary objectives. The primary objectives for the SLWRI are: (1) Increase the restoration of anadromous fish populations in the Sacramento River primarily upstream from the Red Bluff Diversion Dam and (2) increase water supplies and water supply reliability for agricultural, municipal and industrial, and environmental purposes to help meet future water demands, with a focus on enlarging Shasta Dam and Reservoir. • Secondary Planning Objectives: Through pursuit of the primary planning objectives, the following secondary objectives will be met to the extent possible: (1) Preserve and restore ecosystem resources in the Shasta Lake area and along the upper Sacramento River, (2) reduce flood damages along the Sacramento River; (3) develop additional hydropower capabilities at Shasta Dam, and (4) preserve outdoor recreation opportunities at Shasta Lake. Initial Alternatives From the Planning Objectives and a resulting planning constraints and criteria, a number of water resources management measures were identified. The most effective of measures were used to formulate a set of concept plans from which five initial alternatives were developed. Specific measures and combinations of measures in these initial alternatives will likely change in future studies and some may be combined with others or dropped from further consideration. In addition, other measures and combination of measures may emerge and warrant development into alternatives during the scoping process. These five initial alternatives are summarized below. • No-Action (No Federal Action): Under the No-Action Alternative, the Federal Government would take no action toward implementing a specific plan to help increase anadromous fish survival opportunities in the upper E:\FR\FM\07OCN1.SGM 07OCN1 58746 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 194 / Friday, October 7, 2005 / Notices Sacramento River nor help address the growing water reliability issues in the Central Valley of California through the assistance of Shasta Dam and Reservoir. • Increase Water Supply Reliability with Shasta Enlargement: The primary purpose of this initial alternative is to be consistent with the goals of the CALFED ROD, which focus on increasing CVP and SWP water supply reliability while contributing to increased anadromous fish survival. It includes raising Shasta Dam between 6.5 to 18.5 feet, which would increase storage space in Shasta Reservoir by 290,000 acre-feet and 640,000 acre-feet, respectively. The increased pool depth and volume also could contribute to incidental benefits for flood control, hydropower, and outdoor recreation. • Increase Water Supply Reliability with Shasta Enlargement and Conjunctive Water Management: The primary purpose of this initial alternative is to increase CVP and SWP water supply reliability through a combination of enlargement of Shasta Dam and Reservoir and conjunctive water management, consistent with the goals of the CALFED ROD. This plan is similar to the above initial alternative and includes raising Shasta Dam up to about 18.5 feet. It also includes implementing a conjunctive water management component consisting primarily of contract agreements between Reclamation and Sacramento River basin water users. • Increase Anadromous Fish Habitat and Water Supply Reliability with Shasta Enlargement: The primary purpose of this initial alternative is to address both primary objectives with a focus on increasing anadromous fish habitat and enlarging Shasta Reservoir up to about 18.5 feet. In addition to increasing the cold water pool in Shasta Lake, this alternative includes restoring inactive gravel mines along the Sacramento River to help benefit anadromous fish. • Multipurpose with Shasta Enlargement: This initial alternative also consists of raising Shasta Dam up to about 18.5 feet. In addition, to address the primary objectives, it includes conjunctive water management and restoring inactive gravel mines and floodplain habitat along the upper Sacramento River. Features that address the secondary objectives include constructing warm water fish habitat in the Shasta Lake area, restoring one or more riparian habitat areas between Redding and Red Bluff on the Sacramento River, and possibly reoperating Shasta Dam for increased flood control. VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:27 Oct 06, 2005 Jkt 208001 These and other possible alternatives will be considered and developed through comments received during the scoping process. During scoping, Reclamation will be seeking input about possible methods for evaluating water management that will meet the identified water resources problems and needs consistent with the planning objectives. Written comments, including names and home addresses of respondents, will be made available for public review. Individual respondents may request that their home address be withheld from public disclosure, which will be honored to the extent allowable by law. There may be circumstances in which respondents’ identity may also be withheld from public disclosure, as allowable by law. If you wish to have your name and/or address withheld, you must state this prominently at the beginning of your comment. All submissions from organizations or businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives or officials of organizations or businesses, will be made available for public disclosure in their entirety. Dated: August 26, 2005. Michael Nepstad, Deputy Regional Environmental Officer, MidPacific Region. [FR Doc. 05–20169 Filed 10–6–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–MN–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. TA–421–6] Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From China Determination On the basis of information developed in the subject investigation, the United States International Trade Commission determines, pursuant to section 421(b)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974,1 that circular welded non-alloy steel pipe 2 1 19 U.S.C. 2451(b)(1). products subject to this investigation include certain welded carbon quality steel pipes and tubes, of circular cross-section, with an outside diameter of 0.372 inches (9.45 mm) or more, but not more than 16 inches (406.4 mm), regardless of wall thickness, surface finish (black, galvanized, or painted), end finish (plain end, beveled end, grooved, threaded, or threaded and coupled), or industry specification (ASTM, proprietary, or other), generally known as standard pipe and structural pipe (they may also be referred to as structural or mechanical tubing). The term carbon quality steel may include certain low alloy steel imported as other alloy steel pipes and tubes. All pipe meeting the physical description set forth above that is used in, or intended for use in, 2 The PO 00000 Frm 00085 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 from the People’s Republic of China is being imported into the United States in such increased quantities or under such conditions as to cause or threaten to cause market disruption to the domestic producers of like or directly competitive products.3 Background Following receipt of a petition, on August 2, 2005, on behalf of Allied Tube and Conduit Corp., Harvey, IL; IPSCO Tubulars, Inc., Camanche, IA; Maruichi American Corp., Santa Fe Springs, CA; Maverick Tube Corp., Chesterfield, MO; Sharon Tube Co., Sharon, PA; Western Tube Conduit Corp., Long Beach, CA; Wheatland Tube Co., Wheatland, PA.; and the United Steelworkers of America, AFL–CIO, Pittsburgh, PA; the Commission instituted investigation No. TA–421–06, Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from China, under section 421(b) of the Act to determine whether circular welded non-alloy steel pipe standard and structural pipe applications is covered by the scope of this investigation. Standard pipe applications include the low-pressure conveyance of water, steam, natural gas, air and other liquids and gases in plumbing and heating systems, air conditioning units, automatic sprinkler systems, and other related uses. Standard pipe may also be used for light load-bearing and mechanical applications, such as for fence tubing, and as an intermediate product for protection of electrical wiring, such as conduit shells. Structural pipe is used in construction applications. Products not included in this investigation are mechanical tubing (whether or not cold-drawn) provided for in HTS subheading 7306.30.50, tube and pipe hollows for redrawing provided for in HTS 7306.30.5035, or finished electrical conduit provided for in HTS 7306.30.5028. API line pipe used in oil or gas applications requiring API certifications is also not included in this investigation. Similarly, pipe produced to the API specifications for oil country tubular goods use are not included in this investigation. The subject imported products are currently provided for in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS) subheadings 7306.30.10 and 7306.30.50. Specifically, the various HTS statistical reporting numbers under which the subject standard pipe has been provided for since January 1, 1992, are as follows: 7306.30.1000, 7306.30.5025, 7306.30.5032, 7306.30.5040, 7306.30.5055, 7306.30.5085, and 7306.30.5090. Although the HTS category is provided for convenience and Customs purposes, the written description of the merchandise under investigation is dispositive. Pipe multiple-stenciled to the ASTM A–53 specification and to any other specification, such as the API-fL or 5L X–42 specifications, or singlecertified pipe that enters under HTS subheading 7306.10.10, is covered by this investigation when used in, or intended for use in, one of the standard pipe applications listed above, regardless of the HTS category in which it is entered. Pipe shells that enter the United States under HTS subheading 7306.30.50, including HTS statistical reporting number 7306.30.5028, are also covered by this investigation. The investigation also covers pipe used for the production of scaffolding (but does not include finished scaffolding). 3 Vice Chairman Deanna Tanner Okun and Commissioner Daniel R. Pearson make a negative determination. E:\FR\FM\07OCN1.SGM 07OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 194 (Friday, October 7, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 58744-58746]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-20169]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Bureau of Reclamation


Shasta Lake Water Resources Investigation, Shasta and Tehama 
Counties, CA

AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement 
(EIS) and notice of public scoping meetings.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the 
Bureau of Reclamation proposes to prepare an EIS for the Shasta Lake 
Water Resources Investigation (SLWRI). Authorization for the 
investigation comes from Pub. L. 96-375, 1980; which directs the 
Secretary of the Interior to engage in feasibility studies related to 
enlarging Shasta Dam and Reservoir. Other directing legislation 
includes Title 34 of Pub. L. 102-575, the Central Valley Project 
Improvement Act and Pub. L. 108-137, the Energy and Water Development 
Act. In addition, enlargement of Shasta Dam was identified in the 
CALFED Programmatic Environmental Impact Report/Statement and Record of 
Decision (ROD) and in Pub. L. 108-361, the CALFED Bay-Delta authority.

DATES: A series of public scoping meetings will be held to solicit 
public input on the scope of the environmental document, alternatives, 
concerns, and

[[Page 58745]]

issues to be addressed in the EIS. The meeting dates are as follows:

     October 24, 2005, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sacramento, CA.
     October 24, 2005, 6 to 9 p.m., Concord, CA.
     October 26, 2005, 1 to 4 p.m., Los Angeles, CA.
     November 1, 2005, 6 to 9 p.m., Fresno, CA.
     November 2, 2005, 6 to 9 p.m., Dunsmuir, CA.
     November 3, 2005, 6 to 9 p.m., Red Bluff, CA.
    Submit written comments on or before December 6, 2005 to the 
address provided below.

ADDRESSES: The public scoping meeting locations are:

     Federal Building, 2800 Cottage Way, Rooms C-1001 and C-
1002, Sacramento, CA.
     Heald Conference Center, 5130 Commercial Circle, Concord, 
CA.
     Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, 700 
North Alameda Street Room 1-102, Los Angeles, CA.
     Piccadilly Inn, 2305 West Shaw Avenue, in Fresno, CA.
     Dunsmuir Community Building, 4835 Dunsmuir Avenue in 
Dunsmuir, CA.
     Red Bluff Community Center, Auditorium, 1500 South 
Jackson.
    Written comments on the scope of the environmental document should 
be sent to: Ms. Sammie Cervantes, Bureau of Reclamation, 2800 Cottage 
Way, MP-700, Sacramento CA 95825.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Donna Garcia, Reclamation Project 
Manager, at the above address, at 916-978-5009, TDD 916-978-5608, or 
via fax at 916-978-5094 or e-mail at dgarcia@mp.usbr.gov. If special 
assistance is required, please contact Ms. Cervantes at 916-978-5189, 
TDD 916-978-5608, or via e-mail at scervantes@mp.usbr.gov no less than 
5 working days prior to the meetings. Further information on the 
investigation, including interim results, can be found on the SLWRI Web 
site at http://www.usbr.gov/mp/slwri or through the above contact 
persons.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Constructed from 1938 to 1945, Shasta Dam 
serves multiple purposes including flood control, irrigation and 
municipal and industrial water supplies, and hydropower generation. In 
addition, Shasta Lake significantly contributes to the regional economy 
through extensive recreational activities.
    Initial feasibility studies in partial response to Pub. L. 96-375 
culminated in a 1988 Wrap-Up Report which concluded that enlarging 
Shasta Dam and Reservoir could significantly increase water supply 
reliability, if and when water demands warranted the required 
financing. The current feasibility scope study primarily involving 
enlargement of Shasta Dam and Reservoir was reinitiated in 2000. 
Raising Shasta Dam is one of five surface water storage projects 
identified in the August 2000 CALFED ROD which includes North of Delta 
Off-Stream Storage, In-Delta Storage, Los Vaqueros Enlargement, and 
Upper San Joaquin River Basin Storage Investigation. These surface 
water storage projects are being developed further in separate 
feasibility studies.
    The primary study area for the SLWRI is Shasta Dam and Reservoir; 
tributary rivers and streams, including the upper reaches of the 
Sacramento River, McCloud River, Pit River, and Squaw Creek; and the 
Sacramento River downstream from Shasta Dam to about the Red Bluff 
Diversion Dam. Because of the potential influence of a Shasta Dam 
modification on natural resources along the Sacramento River and on 
programs and projects in the Central Valley, the extended study area 
includes other major tributaries to the Sacramento River, the 
Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, San Joaquin River basin, and service 
areas of the Central Valley Project (CVP) and State Water Project 
(SWP).
    Planning studies to date have focused on identifying water 
resources problems and needs in the primary study area, developing a 
set of planning objectives to help guide the remainder of the 
feasibility study, and formulating several initial alternatives. These 
three important elements of the study are summarized below.

Problems and Needs

    Major water and related resources problems and needs identified in 
the primary study area include:
     Anadromous Fish Restoration: The population of Chinook 
salmon has declined in the Central Valley. To address this salmon 
decline in the Sacramento River, various actions have been taken, 
ranging from establishing minimum flow requirements in the river to 
making structural changes at Shasta Dam. However, a need still exists 
for additional actions to benefit anadromous fish, especially in dry 
and critically dry water years.
     Water Supply Reliability: Demand for water in California 
exceeds available supplies. As the population of the Central Valley 
grows, the need to maintain a healthy and vibrant industrial and 
agricultural economy will increase while the demand for an adequate 
water supply becomes more acute.
     Other Resource Needs: Other identified problems and needs 
include the need for environmental restoration in the Shasta Lake area 
and downstream along the Sacramento River; the need for additional 
flood control along the upper Sacramento River; and growing demands for 
new energy sources in California and outdoor recreation in the primary 
study area.

Planning Objectives

    The Problems and Needs in the study area were translated into 
Primary and Secondary Planning Objectives.
     Primary Planning Objectives: Alternatives will be 
formulated to address the primary objectives. The primary objectives 
for the SLWRI are: (1) Increase the restoration of anadromous fish 
populations in the Sacramento River primarily upstream from the Red 
Bluff Diversion Dam and (2) increase water supplies and water supply 
reliability for agricultural, municipal and industrial, and 
environmental purposes to help meet future water demands, with a focus 
on enlarging Shasta Dam and Reservoir.
     Secondary Planning Objectives: Through pursuit of the 
primary planning objectives, the following secondary objectives will be 
met to the extent possible: (1) Preserve and restore ecosystem 
resources in the Shasta Lake area and along the upper Sacramento River, 
(2) reduce flood damages along the Sacramento River; (3) develop 
additional hydropower capabilities at Shasta Dam, and (4) preserve 
outdoor recreation opportunities at Shasta Lake.

Initial Alternatives

    From the Planning Objectives and a resulting planning constraints 
and criteria, a number of water resources management measures were 
identified. The most effective of measures were used to formulate a set 
of concept plans from which five initial alternatives were developed. 
Specific measures and combinations of measures in these initial 
alternatives will likely change in future studies and some may be 
combined with others or dropped from further consideration. In 
addition, other measures and combination of measures may emerge and 
warrant development into alternatives during the scoping process. These 
five initial alternatives are summarized below.
     No-Action (No Federal Action): Under the No-Action 
Alternative, the Federal Government would take no action toward 
implementing a specific plan to help increase anadromous fish survival 
opportunities in the upper

[[Page 58746]]

Sacramento River nor help address the growing water reliability issues 
in the Central Valley of California through the assistance of Shasta 
Dam and Reservoir.
     Increase Water Supply Reliability with Shasta Enlargement: 
The primary purpose of this initial alternative is to be consistent 
with the goals of the CALFED ROD, which focus on increasing CVP and SWP 
water supply reliability while contributing to increased anadromous 
fish survival. It includes raising Shasta Dam between 6.5 to 18.5 feet, 
which would increase storage space in Shasta Reservoir by 290,000 acre-
feet and 640,000 acre-feet, respectively. The increased pool depth and 
volume also could contribute to incidental benefits for flood control, 
hydropower, and outdoor recreation.
     Increase Water Supply Reliability with Shasta Enlargement 
and Conjunctive Water Management: The primary purpose of this initial 
alternative is to increase CVP and SWP water supply reliability through 
a combination of enlargement of Shasta Dam and Reservoir and 
conjunctive water management, consistent with the goals of the CALFED 
ROD. This plan is similar to the above initial alternative and includes 
raising Shasta Dam up to about 18.5 feet. It also includes implementing 
a conjunctive water management component consisting primarily of 
contract agreements between Reclamation and Sacramento River basin 
water users.
     Increase Anadromous Fish Habitat and Water Supply 
Reliability with Shasta Enlargement: The primary purpose of this 
initial alternative is to address both primary objectives with a focus 
on increasing anadromous fish habitat and enlarging Shasta Reservoir up 
to about 18.5 feet. In addition to increasing the cold water pool in 
Shasta Lake, this alternative includes restoring inactive gravel mines 
along the Sacramento River to help benefit anadromous fish.
     Multipurpose with Shasta Enlargement: This initial 
alternative also consists of raising Shasta Dam up to about 18.5 feet. 
In addition, to address the primary objectives, it includes conjunctive 
water management and restoring inactive gravel mines and floodplain 
habitat along the upper Sacramento River. Features that address the 
secondary objectives include constructing warm water fish habitat in 
the Shasta Lake area, restoring one or more riparian habitat areas 
between Redding and Red Bluff on the Sacramento River, and possibly re-
operating Shasta Dam for increased flood control.
    These and other possible alternatives will be considered and 
developed through comments received during the scoping process. During 
scoping, Reclamation will be seeking input about possible methods for 
evaluating water management that will meet the identified water 
resources problems and needs consistent with the planning objectives.
    Written comments, including names and home addresses of 
respondents, will be made available for public review. Individual 
respondents may request that their home address be withheld from public 
disclosure, which will be honored to the extent allowable by law. There 
may be circumstances in which respondents' identity may also be 
withheld from public disclosure, as allowable by law. If you wish to 
have your name and/or address withheld, you must state this prominently 
at the beginning of your comment. All submissions from organizations or 
businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as 
representatives or officials of organizations or businesses, will be 
made available for public disclosure in their entirety.

    Dated: August 26, 2005.
Michael Nepstad,
Deputy Regional Environmental Officer, Mid-Pacific Region.
[FR Doc. 05-20169 Filed 10-6-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-MN-P