Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300 B2 and A300 B4 Series Airplanes; Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R and F4-600R Series Airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F Airplanes (Collectively Called A300-600 Series Airplanes); and Model A310-200 and -300 Series Airplanes, 56814-56818 [05-19229]

Download as PDF 56814 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 188 / Thursday, September 29, 2005 / Rules and Regulations needs. The pilot was originally scheduled to expire in 1998 but was extended until December 8, 2004, through a series of legislative actions. On December 8, 2004, President Bush signed Public Law 108–447, Division K, which included the Small Business Administration Reauthorization and Manufacturing Assistance Act of 2004. This Act gave SBA authorization to continue several programs but did not re-authorize the VSB program. Because SBA no longer has statutory authority to conduct the VSB program, the regulations applicable to the program are no longer necessary and will be removed from the Code of Federal Regulations. Removal of these regulations is an entirely administrative action that will minimize confusion about the status of the VSB program and how agencies are to conduct procurements. The expiration of the authority to give preference to very small businesses under the VSB program also impacts the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR). SBA has notified the Civilian Agency Acquisition Council (Council) as well as the Federal procurement agencies of the expiration of the VSB program and intends to work with the Council to implement the necessary amendments to the FAR. Compliance With Executive Orders 12866, 12988, and 13132, the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Ch. 35), and the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601–612) OMB has determined that this final rule does not constitute a ’’significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866. For purposes of the Paperwork Reduction Act, 44 U.S.C. Ch. 35, the SBA determines that this rule does not impose new reporting or recordkeeping requirements. This action meets applicable standards set forth in sections 3(a) and 3(b)(2) of Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform, to minimize litigation, eliminate ambiguity, and reduce burden. The action does not have retroactive or preemptive effect. This regulation will not have substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. Therefore, for the purposes of Executive Order 13132, SBA determines that this final rule has no federalism implications warranting preparation of a federalism assessment. The Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA), 5 U.S.C. 601–612, requires VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:57 Sep 28, 2005 Jkt 205001 administrative agencies to consider the effect of their actions on small entities, small non-profit enterprises, and small local governments. Pursuant to the RFA, when an agency issues a rulemaking, the agency must prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis which describes the impact of the rule on small entities. However, section 605 of the RFA allows an agency to certify a rule, in lieu of preparing an analysis, if the rulemaking is not expected to have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. Within the meaning of RFA, SBA certifies that this rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. List of Subjects 13 CFR Part 121 Administrative practice and procedures, Government procurement, Government property, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Small businesses. 13 CFR Part 125 Government contracts, Government procurement, Small businesses, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Small businesses, Technical assistance. I For the reasons stated in the preamble, the Small Business Administration amends 13 CFR parts 121 and 125 as follows: PART 121—SMALL BUSINESS SIZE REGULATIONS 1. The authority citation for Part 121 is revised to read as follows: I Authority: 15 U.S.C. 632(a), (p), (q), 634(b)(6), 637(a), 644, and 662(5); Pub. L. 105–135 sec. 401 et seq. I 2. Revise § 121.401 to read as follows: § 121.401 What procurement programs are subject to size determinations? The rules set forth in §§ 121.401 through 121.413 apply to all Federal procurement programs for which status as a small business is required or advantageous, including the small business set-aside program, SBA’s Certificate of Competency program, SBA’s 8(a) Business Development program, SBA’s HUBZone program, SBA’s Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business program, the Small Business Subcontracting program, and the Federal Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) program. § 121.413 I [Removed and Reserved] 3. Remove and reserve § 121.413. PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 PART 125—GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS 4. The authority citation for Part 125 is revised to read as follows: I Authority: 15 U.S.C. 632(p), (q); 634(b)(6); 637; 644 and 657(f). § 125.7 [Removed and Reserved] 5. Amend Part 125 by removing and reserving § 125.7. I 6. Revise § 125.13 to read as follows: I § 125.13 May 8(a) Program participants, HUBZone SBCs, Small and Disadvantaged Businesses, or Women-Owned Small Businesses qualify as SDVO SBCs? Yes, 8(a) Program participants, HUBZone SBCs, Small and Disadvantaged Businesses, and WomenOwned SBCs, may also qualify as SDVO SBCs if they meet the requirements in this subject. Dated: September 23, 2005. Hector V. Barretto, Administrator. [FR Doc. 05–19512 Filed 9–28–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8025–01–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2005–20796; Directorate Identifier 2004–NM–160–AD; Amendment 39–14299; AD 2005–20–06] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300 B2 and A300 B4 Series Airplanes; Model A300 B4–600, B4–600R and F4– 600R Series Airplanes, and Model A300 C4–605R Variant F Airplanes (Collectively Called A300–600 Series Airplanes); and Model A310–200 and –300 Series Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all the Airbus models identified above. This AD requires modifying the electrical power supply logic for the integral lighting of the standby horizon indicator in the cockpit, accomplishing repetitive operational tests of the integral lighting logic system, and performing corrective action if necessary. This AD is prompted by a report of temporary loss of six cathode ray tube (CRT) flight displays and the integral lighting of the E:\FR\FM\29SER1.SGM 29SER1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 188 / Thursday, September 29, 2005 / Rules and Regulations standby horizon indicator backlight in the cockpit during takeoff, due to failure of the normal electrical power circuit. That power circuit supplies power to both the CRTs and the standby horizon indicator backlight. We are issuing this AD to prevent loss of the integral lighting due to failure of the normal electrical power circuit, which could result in inability of the pilot to read the backup attitude information during takeoff, and possible deviation from the intended flight path. This AD becomes effective November 3, 2005. The incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the AD is approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of November 3, 2005. DATES: For service information identified in this AD, contact Airbus, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 31707 Blagnac Cedex, France. Docket: The AD docket contains the proposed AD, comments, and any final disposition. You can examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// dms.dot.gov, or in person at the Docket Management Facility office between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The Docket Management Facility office (telephone (800) 647–5227) is located on the plaza level of the Nassif Building at the U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street SW., room PL–401, Washington, DC. This docket number is FAA–2005–20796; the directorate identifier for this docket is 2004–NM– 160–AD. ADDRESSES: Tim Backman, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM–116, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington 98055–4056; telephone (425) 227–2797; fax (425) 227–1149. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA proposed to amend 14 CFR part 39 with an AD for all Airbus Model A300 B2 and A300 B4 series airplanes; Model A300 B4–600, B4–600R and F4–600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4– 605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called A300–600 series airplanes); and Model A310 series airplanes. That action, published in the Federal Register on April 4, 2005 (70 FR 16981), proposed to require modifying the electrical power supply logic for the integral lighting of the standby horizon indicator in the cockpit, accomplishing repetitive operational tests of the integral lighting logic system, and performing corrective action if necessary. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Comments We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the development of this AD. We have considered the comments that have been submitted on the NPRM. Support for Proposed AD One commenter supports the intent and actions specified in the NPRM. Request To Revise Service Information/ Change Certain Requirements One commenter states that it has no objection to the intent of the NPRM—to 56815 prevent loss of integral lighting; however, the commenter has several concerns. Each of the commenter’s concerns is followed by an FAA response. 1. The NPRM and the referenced French airworthiness directive are based on one operator, one airplane, and one event. The commenter notes that the Airbus solution was to issue the referenced service information, and adds that the reported multiple cathode ray tube (CRT) failure seems to be a mystery. Per the Discussion section in the NPRM, ‘‘The temporary loss of the CRTs is still under investigation.’’ However, the referenced service bulletin specifies ‘‘This inspection service bulletin (ISB) recommends checking the standby horizon integral lighting logic supply. Accomplishment of this ISB will avoid the loss of the standby horizon indicator integral lighting.’’ The commenter notes that there is no CRT reference in the service bulletin. The commenter would like to see the modification specified in the service bulletins be compatible with the modification required by the NPRM; for this to occur, the service bulletins must be revised to specify if the CRT issue is corrected with the modification. Airbus has issued the following revised service bulletins (the previous versions were referenced in the NPRM as the appropriate sources of service information for accomplishing certain required actions): REVISED SERVICE BULLETINS For Model— Service Bulletin date— A300 B2 and A300 B4 series airplanes ................................................... A300 B4–600, B4–600R and F4–600R series airplanes; A300 C4– 605R Variant F airplanes. A300–31–0077, Revision 01, dated January 28, 2005. A300–31–6105, Revision 03, dated December 20, 2004. A310 series airplanes ............................................................................... A300–33–6049, Revision 02, dated April 25, 2005. A310–31–2120, Revision 02, dated January 28, 2005; and Revision 03, dated June 22, 2005. We have added the revisions above to this final rule as the sources of service information for accomplishing certain actions. These revisions add no further work to the previous issues of the service bulletins; operators are merely informed that the revised service bulletins are mandatory. We have changed paragraph (f) of this AD to add credit for actions done in accordance with the previous issues of the service bulletins. For clarification, the standby horizon indicator provides backup attitude VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:57 Sep 28, 2005 Jkt 205001 information to the pilot and is illuminated by integral lighting (a backlight). The purpose of modifying the electrical power supply logic for the integral lighting is to provide automatic switching to a different power circuit if there is a failure of the normal power circuit. This switching will allow the pilot to read attitude information from the standby indicator in low light conditions with a failure of the normal power circuit. The technical content of the referenced service bulletins is correct and contains adequate PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 information and procedures to accomplish the modification of the electrical power supply logic; however, this modification will not correct the temporary loss of the CRTs, which is still under investigation. We have changed the Summary section and paragraph (d) of this AD to add this clarification. 2. The modification of the integral lighting power supply logic of the standby horizon is still not the ultimate ‘‘fix’’ since the NPRM requires indefinite repetitive operational tests of E:\FR\FM\29SER1.SGM 29SER1 56816 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 188 / Thursday, September 29, 2005 / Rules and Regulations the modification. The commenter argues that the referenced service bulletins were issued by Airbus as a data collection device to verify that the modification fixed the problem. Further explanation of the necessity of the repetitive operational tests, by the FAA ´ ´ or the Direction Generale de l’Aviation Civile (DGAC), which is the airworthiness authority for France, is requested. We acknowledge the commenter’s concern regarding accomplishing repetitive operational tests indefinitely, but we disagree with the comment that the service bulletins were issued by Airbus as a data collection device to verify that the modification fixed the problem. The FAA, DGAC, and Airbus regard the modification of the integral lighting power supply logic of the standby horizon indicator a final fix to ensure adequate lighting. During operation under normal electrical power, background lighting of the standby attitude is supplied through a specific power circuit. However, the modification provides automatic switching to a different power circuit if there is a failure of the normal power circuit. This feature is hidden as long as the normal power circuit is operating. Consequently, to limit the exposure time of a hidden failure of the automatic switching feature to meet safety objectives, a periodic operational test is required. 3. The NPRM requires indefinite repetitive operational tests of the modification at 600-flight-hour intervals. The commenter has an established B-check maintenance schedule of 350 flight hours and would like to propose that the test interval be changed to a 700-flight-hour interval. This would allow for routine scheduling of aircraft and add only 1.5 man hours to its current B-check workload. We agree that the test interval can be changed to a 700-flight-hour interval. The manufacturer has completed a reassessment of the probability of the loss of the automatic switching feature. As a result of a detailed Failure Mode Effect Analysis, and inclusion of the latest fleet cumulative flight-hour data, the necessary safety objective can be met with an extension of the maximum exposure time to 700 flight hours. We have changed paragraph (h) of this AD accordingly. 4. Of the 189 airplanes of U.S. registry that are affected by the NPRM, the commenter currently operates 107, with 8 more in a passenger-to-freighter conversion process. All of these airplanes will require the proposed modification. The referenced service bulletins specify that obtaining the kits VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:57 Sep 28, 2005 Jkt 205001 to accomplish the modification will take a 4-month lead-time from receipt of order. This makes scheduling and accomplishing the modification on all its airplanes within the 12 month compliance time virtually impossible. The commenter proposes a 36-month compliance time to allow the commenter to take advantage of its Ccheck intervals, which are Airbus specified at 910 days or 3,500 flight hours, whichever occurs first. The proposed compliance time also takes into consideration that maintenance facilities are down for host-country holidays, and limited maintenance is accomplished in the U.S. from October through January for maximum airlift during that time. We agree to extend the compliance time for the modification to within 18 months after the effective date of this AD. We find that, for the airplane models affected by this AD, operators should be able to accomplish the modification within 18-months. For operators that encounter difficulty accomplishing the modification within this timeframe, under the provisions of paragraph (j) of this AD, we may approve a request for further adjustment to the compliance time if data are submitted to substantiate that such an adjustment would provide an acceptable level of safety. 5. The cost estimates for the NPRM differ from the cost estimates specified in the referenced service bulletins. The service bulletins specify a minimum of two Airbus kits, and some airplanes will need three, depending on whether other modifications are embodied. The commenter has computed a required parts price range of $5,410 to $9,350, with an associated work hour range of 31 to 36. Based on these figures, the estimated cost for the proposed modification would be between $7,425 and $11,690 per airplane. The service bulletins also indicate that the operational test will require 1.5 work hours to accomplish, which is an additional $97.50 per airplane, per test cycle. We do not agree, the cost of the kits and the number of work hours are the same as those specified in the referenced service bulletins. The cost analysis in AD rulemaking actions typically does not include incidental costs such as the time required to gain access and close up, time necessary for planning, or time necessitated by other administrative actions. Because the work hours may vary significantly from operator to operator, depending on the airplane configuration, they are almost impossible to calculate. We have made no change to the AD in this regard. PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 6. The corrective action specified in paragraph (i) of the NPRM is too vague and will slow the repair process, as follows: ‘‘If any operational test required by paragraph (h) of this AD fails: Before further flight, accomplish any applicable repair per a method approved by either the Manager, International Branch, ANM–116, FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate; or the ´ ´ Direction Generale de l’Aviation Civile (or its delegated agent).’’ The literal interpretation of this, as written, is that when a test fails, the airplane is grounded until the FAA grants an approved method that would restore the airplane to an operational condition. This prevents the operator from using established maintenance practices until an ‘‘approved method’’ is granted by the FAA or DGAC. The approval required is implied to be per airplane, since the operational test is done by individual airplane. Allowing the use of standard maintenance practices would allow an operator to restore the affected airplane on-site and expedite the return to operational status. The FAA-approved operator’s general maintenance manual, aircraft maintenance manual, illustrated parts catalog, wire diagram manual, and system schematic manual, have always been accepted tools to troubleshoot and restore an airplane to operational status. Instances of a failed test in which standard maintenance practices do not solve the problem should be the only time an AMOC would be required by the FAA or DGAC. We agree that, in the case of a failed test in which standard maintenance practices do not solve the problem, a repair approved by us or the DGAC is required. The service bulletins for the test do not provide formal repair/trouble shooting instructions if a test fails. However, the manufacturer has confirmed that their intent was that any repair/trouble shooting following such failure should be performed per basic maintenance practices, using standard Airbus documentation. We have included the aircraft wiring manual, trouble shooting manual, and aircraft maintenance manual as approved methods for accomplishing the repairs specified in paragraph (i) of this AD. Explanation of Change to Applicability We have revised the applicability of the NPRM to identify model designations as published in the most recent type certificate data sheet for the affected models. Conclusion We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the comments that have been submitted, and E:\FR\FM\29SER1.SGM 29SER1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 188 / Thursday, September 29, 2005 / Rules and Regulations determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting the AD with the changes described previously. We have determined that these changes will neither increase the economic burden on any operator nor increase the scope of the AD. Costs of Compliance This AD affects about 189 airplanes of U.S. registry. It will take between approximately 10 and 36 work hours per airplane to accomplish the modification (depending on the number of kits needed), at an average labor rate of $65 per work hour. Required parts will cost approximately between $310 and $4,880 per airplane. Based on these figures, the estimated cost of the modification is between $960 and $7,220 per airplane. It will take about 1 work hour per airplane to accomplish the operational test, at an average labor rate of $65 per work hour. Based on these figures, the estimated cost of the test is $12,285, or $65 per airplane, per test cycle. Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ‘‘General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. Regulatory Findings We have determined that this AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. We prepared a regulatory evaluation of the estimated costs to comply with this AD. See the ADDRESSES section for a location to examine the regulatory evaluation. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: I PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 2005–20–06 Airbus: Amendment 39–14299. Docket No. FAA–2005–20796; Directorate Identifier 2004–NM–160–AD. Effective Date (a) This AD becomes effective November 3, 2005. Affected ADs (b) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to all Airbus Model A300 B2–1A, B2–1C, B2K–3C, and B2–203 and A300 B4–2C, B4–103, and B4–203 airplanes; Model A300 B4–601, B4–603, B4– 620, and B4–622, A300 B4–605R and B4– 622R, A300 F4–605R and F4–622R, and A300 C4–605R Variant F airplanes; and Model A310–203, –204, –221, and –222 and –304, –322, –324, and –325 airplanes; certificated in any category. Unsafe Condition (d) This AD was prompted by a report of temporary loss of six cathode ray tube (CRT) flight displays and the integral lighting of the standby horizon indicator in the cockpit during takeoff, due to failure of the normal electrical power circuit. That power circuit supplies power to both the CRTs and standby horizon indicator backlight. We are issuing this AD to prevent loss of the integral lighting due to failure of the normal electrical power circuit, which could result in inability of the pilot to read the backup attitude information during takeoff, and possible deviation from the intended flight path. Compliance (e) You are responsible for having the actions required by this AD performed within the compliance times specified, unless the actions have already been done. Required Service Information 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: I Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 56817 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): I (f) Unless otherwise specified in this AD, the term ‘‘service bulletin,’’ as used in this AD, means the Accomplishment Instructions of the applicable service bulletin identified in Table 1 of this AD. Airbus Service Bulletins A300–33–0126, A300–33–6049, and A310–33–2047 specify to submit certain information to the manufacturer, but this AD does not include that requirement. TABLE 1.—SERVICE BULLETINS And, for actions done before the effective date of this AD, credit is given for prior accomplishing of— For Airbus Models— Use Airbus Service Bulletin(s)— Revision— Dated— A300 B2 and A300 B4 series ........ A300–31–0077 (Airbus Modification 12513). A300–33–0126 ............................. A300–31–6105 (Airbus Modifications 12513 and 12730). 01 ................ January 28, 2005 Original, dated March 2, 2004. Original ........ 03 ................ April 5, 2004 ........ December 20, 2004. N/A. Revision 02, dated May 27, 2003. A300–33–6049 ............................. 02 ................ April 25, 2005 ...... A310–31–2120 (Airbus Modification 12513). 03 ................ June 22, 2005 ..... Original, dated April 5, 2004; Revision 01, dated May 28, 2004. Original, dated November 19, 2002; Revision 01, dated May 27, 2003; Revision 02, dated January 28, 2005. A300 B4–600; A300 B4–600R and F4–600R series; and A300 C4– 605R Variant F airplanes. A310 series .................................... VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:57 Sep 28, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\29SER1.SGM 29SER1 56818 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 188 / Thursday, September 29, 2005 / Rules and Regulations TABLE 1.—SERVICE BULLETINS—Continued For Airbus Models— And, for actions done before the effective date of this AD, credit is given for prior accomplishing of— Use Airbus Service Bulletin(s)— Revision— Dated— A310–33–2047 ............................. Original ........ April 5, 2004 ........ Modification (g) For airplanes on which Airbus Modifications 12513 and 12730 have not been accomplished: Within 18 months after the effective date of this AD, modify the electrical power supply logic of the integral lighting for the standby horizon indicator in the cockpit in accordance with the service bulletin. Repetitive Operational Tests (h) For all airplanes: Within 700 flight hours after accomplishing the modification required by paragraph (g) of this AD, or within 700 flight hours after the effective date of this AD, whichever is later, accomplish the operational test of the integral lighting logic system in accordance with the service bulletin. Repeat the test N/A. thereafter at intervals not to exceed 700 flight hours. approved by the FAA or the DGAC is required. Corrective Action Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (j) The Manager, International Branch, ANM–116, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested in accordance with the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. (i) If any operational test required by paragraph (h) of this AD fails: Before further flight, accomplish any applicable repair per a method approved by either the Manager, International Branch, ANM–116, FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate; or the ´ ´ Direction Generale de l’Aviation Civile (DGAC) (or its delegated agent). Airbus A300–600 and A310 Trouble Shooting Manuals; Airbus A300–600 and A310 Aircraft Wiring Manuals; and Airbus A300– 600 and A310 Aircraft Maintenance Manuals, are approved methods for accomplishing the repair, as applicable. Except, in the case of a failed test in which standard maintenance practices do not solve the problem, a repair Related Information (k) French airworthiness directive F–2004– 098, dated July 7, 2004, also addresses the subject of this AD. Material Incorporated by Reference (l) You must use the applicable service bulletin identified in Table 2 of this AD to perform the actions that are required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. TABLE 2.—SERVICE BULLETINS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE Airbus Service Bulletin— Revision— A300–31–0077 ............................................................................................................................................. A300–31–6105 ............................................................................................................................................. A300–33–0126, excluding Appendix 01 ...................................................................................................... A300–33–6049, excluding Appendix 01 ...................................................................................................... A310–31–2120 ............................................................................................................................................. A310–33–2047, excluding Appendix 01 ...................................................................................................... 01 ................ 03 ................ Original ........ 02 ................ 03 ................ Original ........ The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of these documents in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Contact Airbus, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 31707 Blagnac Cedex, France, for a copy of this service information. You may review copies at the Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street SW., Room PL–401, Nassif Building, Washington, DC; on the internet at http:// dms.dot.gov; or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at the NARA, call (202) 741–6030, or go to http://www.archives.gov/ federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ ibr_locations.html. Issued in Renton, Washington, on September 20, 2005. Ali Bahrami, Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 05–19229 Filed 9–28–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–U VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:57 Sep 28, 2005 Jkt 205001 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2005–22540; Directorate Identifier 2004–NM–137–AD; Amendment 39–14301; AD 2005–20–08] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A330–200 and –300 Series Airplanes; and Model A340–200 and –300 Series Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus transport category airplanes, identified above. This AD requires an inspection to determine if a certain lower pin (p-pin) of the retraction actuator of the main landing gear (MLG) is installed. If the affected p-pin is installed, this AD requires a one-time PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Dated— January 28, 2005. December 20, 2004. April 5, 2004. April 25, 2005. June 22, 2005. April 5, 2004. inspection of the p-pin for correct grease hole position and cracking; repetitive daily inspections for pin migration; and eventual replacement of all p-pins with new p-pins. For any p-pin that is cracked or shows pin migration, this AD requires immediate replacement with a new p-pin. Replacing the p-pin with one that is correctly manufactured (i.e., that has the correct grease hole position) is terminating action for the repetitive inspections. This AD results from a report that a cracked p-pin was found when the MLG was removed for overhaul. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the p-pin, which could result in degradation of the MLG structural integrity and possible hazardous landing. Effective October 14, 2005. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the AD as of October 14, 2005. We must receive comments on this AD by November 28, 2005. DATES: E:\FR\FM\29SER1.SGM 29SER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 188 (Thursday, September 29, 2005)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 56814-56818]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-19229]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2005-20796; Directorate Identifier 2004-NM-160-AD; 
Amendment 39-14299; AD 2005-20-06]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300 B2 and A300 B4 Series 
Airplanes; Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R and F4-600R Series Airplanes, and 
Model A300 C4-605R Variant F Airplanes (Collectively Called A300-600 
Series Airplanes); and Model A310-200 and -300 Series Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of 
Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all 
the Airbus models identified above. This AD requires modifying the 
electrical power supply logic for the integral lighting of the standby 
horizon indicator in the cockpit, accomplishing repetitive operational 
tests of the integral lighting logic system, and performing corrective 
action if necessary. This AD is prompted by a report of temporary loss 
of six cathode ray tube (CRT) flight displays and the integral lighting 
of the

[[Page 56815]]

standby horizon indicator backlight in the cockpit during takeoff, due 
to failure of the normal electrical power circuit. That power circuit 
supplies power to both the CRTs and the standby horizon indicator 
backlight. We are issuing this AD to prevent loss of the integral 
lighting due to failure of the normal electrical power circuit, which 
could result in inability of the pilot to read the backup attitude 
information during takeoff, and possible deviation from the intended 
flight path.

DATES: This AD becomes effective November 3, 2005.
    The incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in 
the AD is approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of 
November 3, 2005.

ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this AD, contact 
Airbus, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 31707 Blagnac Cedex, France.
    Docket: The AD docket contains the proposed AD, comments, and any 
final disposition. You can examine the AD docket on the Internet at 
http://dms.dot.gov, or in person at the Docket Management Facility 
office between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal 
holidays. The Docket Management Facility office (telephone (800) 647-
5227) is located on the plaza level of the Nassif Building at the U.S. 
Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street SW., room PL-401, 
Washington, DC. This docket number is FAA-2005-20796; the directorate 
identifier for this docket is 2004-NM-160-AD.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tim Backman, Aerospace Engineer, 
International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 
Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington 98055-4056; telephone (425) 227-
2797; fax (425) 227-1149.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA proposed to amend 14 CFR part 39 
with an AD for all Airbus Model A300 B2 and A300 B4 series airplanes; 
Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 
C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called A300-600 series 
airplanes); and Model A310 series airplanes. That action, published in 
the Federal Register on April 4, 2005 (70 FR 16981), proposed to 
require modifying the electrical power supply logic for the integral 
lighting of the standby horizon indicator in the cockpit, accomplishing 
repetitive operational tests of the integral lighting logic system, and 
performing corrective action if necessary.

Comments

    We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the 
development of this AD. We have considered the comments that have been 
submitted on the NPRM.

Support for Proposed AD

    One commenter supports the intent and actions specified in the 
NPRM.

Request To Revise Service Information/Change Certain Requirements

    One commenter states that it has no objection to the intent of the 
NPRM--to prevent loss of integral lighting; however, the commenter has 
several concerns. Each of the commenter's concerns is followed by an 
FAA response.
    1. The NPRM and the referenced French airworthiness directive are 
based on one operator, one airplane, and one event. The commenter notes 
that the Airbus solution was to issue the referenced service 
information, and adds that the reported multiple cathode ray tube (CRT) 
failure seems to be a mystery. Per the Discussion section in the NPRM, 
``The temporary loss of the CRTs is still under investigation.'' 
However, the referenced service bulletin specifies ``This inspection 
service bulletin (ISB) recommends checking the standby horizon integral 
lighting logic supply. Accomplishment of this ISB will avoid the loss 
of the standby horizon indicator integral lighting.'' The commenter 
notes that there is no CRT reference in the service bulletin. The 
commenter would like to see the modification specified in the service 
bulletins be compatible with the modification required by the NPRM; for 
this to occur, the service bulletins must be revised to specify if the 
CRT issue is corrected with the modification.
    Airbus has issued the following revised service bulletins (the 
previous versions were referenced in the NPRM as the appropriate 
sources of service information for accomplishing certain required 
actions):

                        Revised Service Bulletins
------------------------------------------------------------------------
              For Model--                    Service Bulletin date--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
A300 B2 and A300 B4 series airplanes...  A300-31-0077, Revision 01,
                                          dated January 28, 2005.
A300 B4-600, B4-600R and F4-600R series  A300-31-6105, Revision 03,
 airplanes; A300 C4-605R Variant F        dated December 20, 2004.
 airplanes.
                                         A300-33-6049, Revision 02,
                                          dated April 25, 2005.
A310 series airplanes..................  A310-31-2120, Revision 02,
                                          dated January 28, 2005; and
                                          Revision 03, dated June 22,
                                          2005.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    We have added the revisions above to this final rule as the sources 
of service information for accomplishing certain actions. These 
revisions add no further work to the previous issues of the service 
bulletins; operators are merely informed that the revised service 
bulletins are mandatory. We have changed paragraph (f) of this AD to 
add credit for actions done in accordance with the previous issues of 
the service bulletins.
    For clarification, the standby horizon indicator provides backup 
attitude information to the pilot and is illuminated by integral 
lighting (a backlight). The purpose of modifying the electrical power 
supply logic for the integral lighting is to provide automatic 
switching to a different power circuit if there is a failure of the 
normal power circuit. This switching will allow the pilot to read 
attitude information from the standby indicator in low light conditions 
with a failure of the normal power circuit. The technical content of 
the referenced service bulletins is correct and contains adequate 
information and procedures to accomplish the modification of the 
electrical power supply logic; however, this modification will not 
correct the temporary loss of the CRTs, which is still under 
investigation. We have changed the Summary section and paragraph (d) of 
this AD to add this clarification.
    2. The modification of the integral lighting power supply logic of 
the standby horizon is still not the ultimate ``fix'' since the NPRM 
requires indefinite repetitive operational tests of

[[Page 56816]]

the modification. The commenter argues that the referenced service 
bulletins were issued by Airbus as a data collection device to verify 
that the modification fixed the problem. Further explanation of the 
necessity of the repetitive operational tests, by the FAA or the 
Direction G[eacute]n[eacute]rale de l'Aviation Civile (DGAC), which is 
the airworthiness authority for France, is requested.
    We acknowledge the commenter's concern regarding accomplishing 
repetitive operational tests indefinitely, but we disagree with the 
comment that the service bulletins were issued by Airbus as a data 
collection device to verify that the modification fixed the problem. 
The FAA, DGAC, and Airbus regard the modification of the integral 
lighting power supply logic of the standby horizon indicator a final 
fix to ensure adequate lighting. During operation under normal 
electrical power, background lighting of the stand-by attitude is 
supplied through a specific power circuit. However, the modification 
provides automatic switching to a different power circuit if there is a 
failure of the normal power circuit. This feature is hidden as long as 
the normal power circuit is operating. Consequently, to limit the 
exposure time of a hidden failure of the automatic switching feature to 
meet safety objectives, a periodic operational test is required.
    3. The NPRM requires indefinite repetitive operational tests of the 
modification at 600-flight-hour intervals. The commenter has an 
established B-check maintenance schedule of 350 flight hours and would 
like to propose that the test interval be changed to a 700-flight-hour 
interval. This would allow for routine scheduling of aircraft and add 
only 1.5 man hours to its current B-check workload.
    We agree that the test interval can be changed to a 700-flight-hour 
interval. The manufacturer has completed a reassessment of the 
probability of the loss of the automatic switching feature. As a result 
of a detailed Failure Mode Effect Analysis, and inclusion of the latest 
fleet cumulative flight-hour data, the necessary safety objective can 
be met with an extension of the maximum exposure time to 700 flight 
hours. We have changed paragraph (h) of this AD accordingly.
    4. Of the 189 airplanes of U.S. registry that are affected by the 
NPRM, the commenter currently operates 107, with 8 more in a passenger-
to-freighter conversion process. All of these airplanes will require 
the proposed modification. The referenced service bulletins specify 
that obtaining the kits to accomplish the modification will take a 4-
month lead-time from receipt of order. This makes scheduling and 
accomplishing the modification on all its airplanes within the 12 month 
compliance time virtually impossible. The commenter proposes a 36-month 
compliance time to allow the commenter to take advantage of its C-check 
intervals, which are Airbus specified at 910 days or 3,500 flight 
hours, whichever occurs first. The proposed compliance time also takes 
into consideration that maintenance facilities are down for host-
country holidays, and limited maintenance is accomplished in the U.S. 
from October through January for maximum airlift during that time.
    We agree to extend the compliance time for the modification to 
within 18 months after the effective date of this AD. We find that, for 
the airplane models affected by this AD, operators should be able to 
accomplish the modification within 18-months. For operators that 
encounter difficulty accomplishing the modification within this 
timeframe, under the provisions of paragraph (j) of this AD, we may 
approve a request for further adjustment to the compliance time if data 
are submitted to substantiate that such an adjustment would provide an 
acceptable level of safety.
    5. The cost estimates for the NPRM differ from the cost estimates 
specified in the referenced service bulletins. The service bulletins 
specify a minimum of two Airbus kits, and some airplanes will need 
three, depending on whether other modifications are embodied. The 
commenter has computed a required parts price range of $5,410 to 
$9,350, with an associated work hour range of 31 to 36. Based on these 
figures, the estimated cost for the proposed modification would be 
between $7,425 and $11,690 per airplane. The service bulletins also 
indicate that the operational test will require 1.5 work hours to 
accomplish, which is an additional $97.50 per airplane, per test cycle.
    We do not agree, the cost of the kits and the number of work hours 
are the same as those specified in the referenced service bulletins. 
The cost analysis in AD rulemaking actions typically does not include 
incidental costs such as the time required to gain access and close up, 
time necessary for planning, or time necessitated by other 
administrative actions. Because the work hours may vary significantly 
from operator to operator, depending on the airplane configuration, 
they are almost impossible to calculate. We have made no change to the 
AD in this regard.
    6. The corrective action specified in paragraph (i) of the NPRM is 
too vague and will slow the repair process, as follows: ``If any 
operational test required by paragraph (h) of this AD fails: Before 
further flight, accomplish any applicable repair per a method approved 
by either the Manager, International Branch, ANM-116, FAA, Transport 
Airplane Directorate; or the Direction G[eacute]n[eacute]rale de 
l'Aviation Civile (or its delegated agent).'' The literal 
interpretation of this, as written, is that when a test fails, the 
airplane is grounded until the FAA grants an approved method that would 
restore the airplane to an operational condition. This prevents the 
operator from using established maintenance practices until an 
``approved method'' is granted by the FAA or DGAC. The approval 
required is implied to be per airplane, since the operational test is 
done by individual airplane. Allowing the use of standard maintenance 
practices would allow an operator to restore the affected airplane on-
site and expedite the return to operational status. The FAA-approved 
operator's general maintenance manual, aircraft maintenance manual, 
illustrated parts catalog, wire diagram manual, and system schematic 
manual, have always been accepted tools to troubleshoot and restore an 
airplane to operational status. Instances of a failed test in which 
standard maintenance practices do not solve the problem should be the 
only time an AMOC would be required by the FAA or DGAC.
    We agree that, in the case of a failed test in which standard 
maintenance practices do not solve the problem, a repair approved by us 
or the DGAC is required. The service bulletins for the test do not 
provide formal repair/trouble shooting instructions if a test fails. 
However, the manufacturer has confirmed that their intent was that any 
repair/trouble shooting following such failure should be performed per 
basic maintenance practices, using standard Airbus documentation. We 
have included the aircraft wiring manual, trouble shooting manual, and 
aircraft maintenance manual as approved methods for accomplishing the 
repairs specified in paragraph (i) of this AD.

Explanation of Change to Applicability

    We have revised the applicability of the NPRM to identify model 
designations as published in the most recent type certificate data 
sheet for the affected models.

Conclusion

    We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the 
comments that have been submitted, and

[[Page 56817]]

determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting the 
AD with the changes described previously. We have determined that these 
changes will neither increase the economic burden on any operator nor 
increase the scope of the AD.

Costs of Compliance

    This AD affects about 189 airplanes of U.S. registry.
    It will take between approximately 10 and 36 work hours per 
airplane to accomplish the modification (depending on the number of 
kits needed), at an average labor rate of $65 per work hour. Required 
parts will cost approximately between $310 and $4,880 per airplane. 
Based on these figures, the estimated cost of the modification is 
between $960 and $7,220 per airplane.
    It will take about 1 work hour per airplane to accomplish the 
operational test, at an average labor rate of $65 per work hour. Based 
on these figures, the estimated cost of the test is $12,285, or $65 per 
airplane, per test cycle.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ``General 
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with 
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing 
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator 
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within 
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition 
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this 
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    We have determined that this AD will not have federalism 
implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a 
substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between 
the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
    (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive 
Order 12866;
    (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and 
Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and
    (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
    We prepared a regulatory evaluation of the estimated costs to 
comply with this AD. See the ADDRESSES section for a location to 
examine the regulatory evaluation.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

Adoption of the Amendment

0
Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, 
the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness 
directive (AD):

2005-20-06 Airbus: Amendment 39-14299. Docket No. FAA-2005-20796; 
Directorate Identifier 2004-NM-160-AD.

Effective Date

    (a) This AD becomes effective November 3, 2005.

Affected ADs

    (b) None.

Applicability

    (c) This AD applies to all Airbus Model A300 B2-1A, B2-1C, B2K-
3C, and B2-203 and A300 B4-2C, B4-103, and B4-203 airplanes; Model 
A300 B4-601, B4-603, B4-620, and B4-622, A300 B4-605R and B4-622R, 
A300 F4-605R and F4-622R, and A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes; and 
Model A310-203, -204, -221, and -222 and -304, -322, -324, and -325 
airplanes; certificated in any category.

Unsafe Condition

    (d) This AD was prompted by a report of temporary loss of six 
cathode ray tube (CRT) flight displays and the integral lighting of 
the standby horizon indicator in the cockpit during takeoff, due to 
failure of the normal electrical power circuit. That power circuit 
supplies power to both the CRTs and standby horizon indicator 
backlight. We are issuing this AD to prevent loss of the integral 
lighting due to failure of the normal electrical power circuit, 
which could result in inability of the pilot to read the backup 
attitude information during takeoff, and possible deviation from the 
intended flight path.

Compliance

    (e) You are responsible for having the actions required by this 
AD performed within the compliance times specified, unless the 
actions have already been done.

Required Service Information

    (f) Unless otherwise specified in this AD, the term ``service 
bulletin,'' as used in this AD, means the Accomplishment 
Instructions of the applicable service bulletin identified in Table 
1 of this AD. Airbus Service Bulletins A300-33-0126, A300-33-6049, 
and A310-33-2047 specify to submit certain information to the 
manufacturer, but this AD does not include that requirement.

                                           Table 1.--Service Bulletins
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                               And, for actions
                                                                                                done before the
                                 Use Airbus Service                                            effective date of
      For Airbus Models--           Bulletin(s)--         Revision--            Dated--       this AD, credit is
                                                                                                given for prior
                                                                                              accomplishing of--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A300 B2 and A300 B4 series.....  A300-31-0077        01.................  January 28, 2005..  Original, dated
                                  (Airbus                                                      March 2, 2004.
                                  Modification
                                  12513).
                                 A300-33-0126......  Original...........  April 5, 2004.....  N/A.
A300 B4-600; A300 B4-600R and    A300-31-6105        03.................  December 20, 2004.  Revision 02, dated
 F4-600R series; and A300 C4-     (Airbus                                                      May 27, 2003.
 605R Variant F airplanes.        Modifications
                                  12513 and 12730).
                                 A300-33-6049......  02.................  April 25, 2005....  Original, dated
                                                                                               April 5, 2004;
                                                                                               Revision 01,
                                                                                               dated May 28,
                                                                                               2004.
A310 series....................  A310-31-2120        03.................  June 22, 2005.....  Original, dated
                                  (Airbus                                                      November 19,
                                  Modification                                                 2002; Revision
                                  12513).                                                      01, dated May 27,
                                                                                               2003; Revision
                                                                                               02, dated January
                                                                                               28, 2005.

[[Page 56818]]

 
                                 A310-33-2047......  Original...........  April 5, 2004.....  N/A.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Modification

    (g) For airplanes on which Airbus Modifications 12513 and 12730 
have not been accomplished: Within 18 months after the effective 
date of this AD, modify the electrical power supply logic of the 
integral lighting for the standby horizon indicator in the cockpit 
in accordance with the service bulletin.

Repetitive Operational Tests

    (h) For all airplanes: Within 700 flight hours after 
accomplishing the modification required by paragraph (g) of this AD, 
or within 700 flight hours after the effective date of this AD, 
whichever is later, accomplish the operational test of the integral 
lighting logic system in accordance with the service bulletin. 
Repeat the test thereafter at intervals not to exceed 700 flight 
hours.

Corrective Action

    (i) If any operational test required by paragraph (h) of this AD 
fails: Before further flight, accomplish any applicable repair per a 
method approved by either the Manager, International Branch, ANM-
116, FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate; or the Direction 
G[eacute]n[eacute]rale de l'Aviation Civile (DGAC) (or its delegated 
agent). Airbus A300-600 and A310 Trouble Shooting Manuals; Airbus 
A300-600 and A310 Aircraft Wiring Manuals; and Airbus A300-600 and 
A310 Aircraft Maintenance Manuals, are approved methods for 
accomplishing the repair, as applicable. Except, in the case of a 
failed test in which standard maintenance practices do not solve the 
problem, a repair approved by the FAA or the DGAC is required.

Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

    (j) The Manager, International Branch, ANM-116, has the 
authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested in accordance 
with the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19.

Related Information

    (k) French airworthiness directive F-2004-098, dated July 7, 
2004, also addresses the subject of this AD.

Material Incorporated by Reference

    (l) You must use the applicable service bulletin identified in 
Table 2 of this AD to perform the actions that are required by this 
AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise.

                              Table 2.--Service Bulletins Incorporated by Reference
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Airbus Service Bulletin--                  Revision--                            Dated--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A300-31-0077............................  01..........................  January 28, 2005.
A300-31-6105............................  03..........................  December 20, 2004.
A300-33-0126, excluding Appendix 01.....  Original....................  April 5, 2004.
A300-33-6049, excluding Appendix 01.....  02..........................  April 25, 2005.
A310-31-2120............................  03..........................  June 22, 2005.
A310-33-2047, excluding Appendix 01.....  Original....................  April 5, 2004.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation 
by reference of these documents in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) 
and 1 CFR part 51. Contact Airbus, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 
31707 Blagnac Cedex, France, for a copy of this service information. 
You may review copies at the Docket Management Facility, U.S. 
Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street SW., Room PL-401, 
Nassif Building, Washington, DC; on the internet at http://
dms.dot.gov; or at the National Archives and Records Administration 
(NARA). For information on the availability of this material at the 
NARA, call (202) 741-6030, or go to http://www.archives.gov/
federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_
locations.html.

    Issued in Renton, Washington, on September 20, 2005.
Ali Bahrami,
Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification 
Service.
[FR Doc. 05-19229 Filed 9-28-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-U