Aviation Financing Reauthorization, 54100-54101 [05-18145]

Download as PDF 54100 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 176 / Tuesday, September 13, 2005 / Notices from the ultimate land use control and planning responsibilities of local government. These local responsibilities are not changed in any way under part 150 or through FAA’s review of noise exposure maps. Therefore, the responsibility for the detailed overlaying of noise exposure contours onto the map depicting properties on the surface rests exclusively with the airport operator that submitted those maps, or with those public agencies and planning agencies with which consultation is required under section 47503 of the Act. The FAA has relied on the certification by the airport operator, under section 150.21 of FAR part 150, that the statutorily required consultation has been accomplished. Copies of the full noise exposure map documentation and of the FAA’s evaluation of the maps are available for examination at the following locations: Federal Aviation Administration Detroit Airports District Office 11677 South Wayne Road, Suite 107, Romulus, Michigan 48174. City of Dayton Department of Aviation, 3600 Terminal Drive, Suite 300, Vandalia, Ohio 45377. Questions may be directed to the individual named above under the heading FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Issued in Romulus, Michigan on August 29, 2005. Irene R. Porter, Manager, Detroit Airport District Office, Great Lakes Region. [FR Doc. 05–18151 Filed 9–12–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–M DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Financing Reauthorization Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The current taxes and fees paid into the Aviation Trust Fund, which provide funding for the National Aviation System, are only authorized through September 30, 2007. Since there is only a small and declining balance in the Trust Fund, it is critical that the financing not be allowed to lapse. The new financing structure should generate stable and predictable revenue, maintain the appropriate levels of service, and enable FAA to make longterm investments and tie revenues raised for the system to the infrastructure and operational costs of the system. The FAA has developed a VerDate Aug<18>2005 16:06 Sep 12, 2005 Jkt 205001 series of data packages in examining FAA costs, paid for through the Trust Fund, from a managerial reporting standpoint. These packages will advance everyone’s understanding of FAA costs and what the Agency faces as it considers a range of future funding options. They are available at http:// www.faa.gov/about/office_org/ headquarters_offices/aep/aatf/. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert E. Robeson, Manager, Systems and Policy Analysis Division, Office of Aviation Policy and Plans, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background In April 2005, the FAA hosted a Trust Fund Forum with major aviation stakeholders. A variety of ideas on options to fund the FAA were discussed. At the Trust Fund Forum, FAA began the dialogue on the need to reauthorize the Airport and Airway Trust Fund. The current taxes and fees are only authorized through September 30, 2007 and since there is only a small and declining balance in the Trust Fund, it is critical that financing not be allowed to lapse. The new financing structure should generate stable and predictable revenue, maintain the appropriate levels of service, and enable the FAA to make long-term investments not only in modernization but also in the Next Generation Air Transportation System. The funding mechanism chosen should tie revenues raised for the system to the infrastructure and operational costs of the system. It should also create incentives for the FAA to become increasingly productive. The FAA spent the last several months analyzing cost and activity data as well as funding options. While this analytical work has reached a fairly mature level, it is expected to continue through the fall. FAA is examining the contributions of various stakeholder groups to the Trust Fund under the current tax structure, as well as the impact of different funding mechanisms on the FAA, the flying public, and those stakeholder groups. One major component of this work is an ongoing study that would allocate FAA’s air traffic control costs to users of the system. This ongoing study uses cost accounting data from fiscal year 2004, which is the best available data at this time. While the FAA’s cost accounting system will provide detailed source data in this effort, fiscal year 2004 cost reports apply allocation rules to this PO 00000 Frm 00096 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 data to produce managerial reports so that ATO management can understand costs at the national and facility levels. It is important to note that the cost accounting system continues to improve, so that fiscal year 2006 managerial reports will be based on more refined allocations. Another set of allocation rules would be required to support analysis to determine the most viable proposal to fund the system. In developing these allocation rules, the FAA seeks stakeholder input in order to fully consider principles such as marginal system use, use of congested space and scarce resources, aircraft weight, distance, and other criteria. The allocation rules, of course, must be applied with transparency and would need to be validated by the user community. In addition, the FAA’s Safety and Airports organizations have identified areas where services can be matched to the revenue needed for those programs. Because the FAA cost accounting system will not deliver such reports for these organizations until the middle of 2006, the FAA will use data from its Labor Distribution Reporting system, annual budgets, and grants issued to help develop options for future funding in the meantime. The Administration’s intention is to develop a proposal that has stakeholder support. On September 6, 2005, the FAA Administrator sent a package to key stakeholders. Besides a cover letter that contained the information summarized above, the package also contains questions for stakeholders and the data packages developed to use in examining FAA costs from a managerial reporting standpoint. These packages will advance the understanding of FAA costs and what the Agency faces as it considers a range of future funding options. The stakeholder package available on the FAA’s Web site contains data packages on the Air Traffic Organization including technical background and supporting detail, Airports, Aviation Safety, and International Aviation. Also included are questions regarding: 1. Providing the Right Types of ATC Services. 2. Revisions to Current Tax System. 3. Other Funding Alternatives for Cost Recovery of ATC Services and Cost Allocation. 4. General Fund Questions. 5. Airport Related Issues. 6. Charging for Certification and Other FAA Services. 7. Lessons Learned from Other Countries. E:\FR\FM\13SEN1.SGM 13SEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 176 / Tuesday, September 13, 2005 / Notices Issued in Washington, DC, on September 7, 2005. Robert E. Robeson, Manager, Systems and Policy Analysis Division, Office of Aviation Policy and Plans. [FR Doc. 05–18145 Filed 9–8–05; 2:45 pm] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Special Committee 147: Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems Airborne Equipment Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 147 meeting. AGENCY: VerDate Aug<18>2005 16:06 Sep 12, 2005 Jkt 205001 Issued in Washington, DC, on August 30, 2005. Natalie Ogletree, FAA General Engineer, RTCA Advisory Committee. [FR Doc. 05–18156 Filed 9–12–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–M The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 147: Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems Airborne Equipment. DATES: The meeting will be held September 29, 2005 starting at 9 a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at RTCA, Inc., 1828 L Street, NW., Suite 805, Washington, DC 20036. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: RTCA Secretariat, 1140 Connecticut Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20036; telephone (202) 833–9339; fax (202) 833–9434; Web site http://www.rtca.org. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92– 463, 5 U.S.C., Appendix 2), notice is hereby given for a Special Committee 147 meeting. The agenda will include: • September 29: • Opening Session (Welcome and Introductory Remarks, Review/Approve meeting agenda for 60th meeting, Review/Approve Summary of Previous Meeting, Review of Open Action Items). • SC–147 Activity Reports. • Surveillance Working Group: Hybrid Surveillance MOPS. • Operations Working Group: ‘‘Adjust Vertical Speed, Adjust’’ Ras. • Requirements Working Group (RWG). • Resolution of final comments and approval of the RWG Report: ‘‘Safety Analysis of Proposed Change to TCAS RA Reversal Logic’’.* • Closing Session (Future Actions/ Activities, Date and Place of Next Meeting, Adjourn). *Contact RTCA for a copy of the Final Review and Comment draft of the RWG SUMMARY: report, which has been distributed to SC–147 members prior to the meeting. Attendance is open to the interested public but limited to space availability. With the approval of the chairmen, members of the public may present oral statements at the meeting. Persons wishing to present statements or obtain information should contact the person listed in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. Members of the public may present a written statement to the committee at any time. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement; Washington, DC AGENCIES: U.S. Federal Highway Administration, District of Columbia Division; District of Columbia, Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). SUMMARY: The U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) in coordination with the District of Columbia Department of Transportation (DDOT) in Washington, DC is issuing this notice to advise agencies and the public that a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) will be prepared to asses the impacts of the proposed transportation improvements to the 11th Street Bridges. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Federal Highway Administration, District of Columbia Division: Mr. Michael Hicks, Environmental/Urban Engineer, 1900 K Street, Suite 510, Washington, DC 20006–1103, (202) 219– 3513; or Mr. John Deatrick, Deputy Director/Chief Engineer, District of Columbia, Department of Transportation, 64 New York Avenue, NE., Washington, DC 20005, (202) 671– 2800. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The environmental review of transportation improvement alternatives for the 11th Street Bridges will be conducted in accordance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4371, et seq.), Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) PO 00000 Frm 00097 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 54101 regulations (40 CFR parts 1500–1508), FHWA Code of Federal Regulations (23 CFR 771.101–771.137, et seq.), and all applicable Federal, State, and local government laws, regulations, and policies. Public Scoping Meetings: DDOT will solicit public and agency comments through public scoping, including scoping meetings, on the proposed action. To ensure that the full range of issues is identified early in the process, comments are invited from all interested and/or potentially affected parties. The location and time for each meeting will be publicized in local newspapers and elsewhere. Written comments will be accepted throughout this process and can be forwarded to John Deatrick at the address provided above. Meeting dates, times, and locations will be announced on the project Web site accessible at http:// www.11thStreetBridgesEIS.com and in the following newspapers: The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Hill Rag, and East of the River. Scoping materials will be available at the meetings and may also be obtained in advance of the meetings by contacting Mr. John Deatrick. Scoping materials will be made available on the project Web site. Oral and written comments may be given at the scoping meetings. Comments may also be sent to the address above. Description of Primary Study Area and Transportation Needs The existing 11th Street Bridges cross the Anacostia River in the southeast quadrant of the District of Columbia. They connect the Southeast Freeway (I395) and the Anacostia Freeway (I-295) and they connect to local streets on both sides of the river. Existing ramps provide only partial movement between the freeways. The project area includes both interchanges, both bridges, and the associated ramps. The purpose of the 11th Street Bridges project is to improve connectivity across the Anacostia River to serve local traffic reaching residential, employment, and commercial centers on opposite sides of the river and to serve regional traffic moving between the major employment center of downtown Washington, DC and residential communities in Maryland and Virginia. The DDOT proposes to improve this traffic flow by replacing or reconstructing the pair of one-way bridges and completing the now missing traffic movements to the Anacostia Freeway and the 11th Street Bridges. The 11th Street Bridges project, as defined in the Anacostia Waterfront E:\FR\FM\13SEN1.SGM 13SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 176 (Tuesday, September 13, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 54100-54101]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-18145]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration


Aviation Financing Reauthorization

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The current taxes and fees paid into the Aviation Trust Fund, 
which provide funding for the National Aviation System, are only 
authorized through September 30, 2007. Since there is only a small and 
declining balance in the Trust Fund, it is critical that the financing 
not be allowed to lapse. The new financing structure should generate 
stable and predictable revenue, maintain the appropriate levels of 
service, and enable FAA to make long-term investments and tie revenues 
raised for the system to the infrastructure and operational costs of 
the system. The FAA has developed a series of data packages in 
examining FAA costs, paid for through the Trust Fund, from a managerial 
reporting standpoint. These packages will advance everyone's 
understanding of FAA costs and what the Agency faces as it considers a 
range of future funding options. They are available at http://
www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/aep/aatf/.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert E. Robeson, Manager, Systems 
and Policy Analysis Division, Office of Aviation Policy and Plans, 
Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., 
Washington, DC 20591.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    In April 2005, the FAA hosted a Trust Fund Forum with major 
aviation stakeholders. A variety of ideas on options to fund the FAA 
were discussed. At the Trust Fund Forum, FAA began the dialogue on the 
need to reauthorize the Airport and Airway Trust Fund. The current 
taxes and fees are only authorized through September 30, 2007 and since 
there is only a small and declining balance in the Trust Fund, it is 
critical that financing not be allowed to lapse.
    The new financing structure should generate stable and predictable 
revenue, maintain the appropriate levels of service, and enable the FAA 
to make long-term investments not only in modernization but also in the 
Next Generation Air Transportation System. The funding mechanism chosen 
should tie revenues raised for the system to the infrastructure and 
operational costs of the system. It should also create incentives for 
the FAA to become increasingly productive.
    The FAA spent the last several months analyzing cost and activity 
data as well as funding options. While this analytical work has reached 
a fairly mature level, it is expected to continue through the fall. FAA 
is examining the contributions of various stakeholder groups to the 
Trust Fund under the current tax structure, as well as the impact of 
different funding mechanisms on the FAA, the flying public, and those 
stakeholder groups.
    One major component of this work is an ongoing study that would 
allocate FAA's air traffic control costs to users of the system. This 
ongoing study uses cost accounting data from fiscal year 2004, which is 
the best available data at this time. While the FAA's cost accounting 
system will provide detailed source data in this effort, fiscal year 
2004 cost reports apply allocation rules to this data to produce 
managerial reports so that ATO management can understand costs at the 
national and facility levels. It is important to note that the cost 
accounting system continues to improve, so that fiscal year 2006 
managerial reports will be based on more refined allocations. Another 
set of allocation rules would be required to support analysis to 
determine the most viable proposal to fund the system. In developing 
these allocation rules, the FAA seeks stakeholder input in order to 
fully consider principles such as marginal system use, use of congested 
space and scarce resources, aircraft weight, distance, and other 
criteria. The allocation rules, of course, must be applied with 
transparency and would need to be validated by the user community.
    In addition, the FAA's Safety and Airports organizations have 
identified areas where services can be matched to the revenue needed 
for those programs. Because the FAA cost accounting system will not 
deliver such reports for these organizations until the middle of 2006, 
the FAA will use data from its Labor Distribution Reporting system, 
annual budgets, and grants issued to help develop options for future 
funding in the meantime.
    The Administration's intention is to develop a proposal that has 
stakeholder support. On September 6, 2005, the FAA Administrator sent a 
package to key stakeholders. Besides a cover letter that contained the 
information summarized above, the package also contains questions for 
stakeholders and the data packages developed to use in examining FAA 
costs from a managerial reporting standpoint. These packages will 
advance the understanding of FAA costs and what the Agency faces as it 
considers a range of future funding options.
    The stakeholder package available on the FAA's Web site contains 
data packages on the Air Traffic Organization including technical 
background and supporting detail, Airports, Aviation Safety, and 
International Aviation. Also included are questions regarding:
    1. Providing the Right Types of ATC Services.
    2. Revisions to Current Tax System.
    3. Other Funding Alternatives for Cost Recovery of ATC Services and 
Cost Allocation.
    4. General Fund Questions.
    5. Airport Related Issues.
    6. Charging for Certification and Other FAA Services.
    7. Lessons Learned from Other Countries.


[[Page 54101]]


    Issued in Washington, DC, on September 7, 2005.
Robert E. Robeson,
Manager, Systems and Policy Analysis Division, Office of Aviation 
Policy and Plans.
[FR Doc. 05-18145 Filed 9-8-05; 2:45 pm]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P