Notice of Inventory Completion: School of American Research, Santa Fe, NM, 54076-54078 [05-18082]

Download as PDF 54076 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 176 / Tuesday, September 13, 2005 / Notices place name of Etowah to the Muscogee language. Between 1927 and 1928, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals were removed from the Little Egypt site in Murray County, GA, by Warren King Moorehead of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology. The Little Egypt site is 5 hectares and contains two or three platform mounds, which were utilized through the mid–16th century. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The Little Egypt site is located at the eastern edge of the Coosa chiefdom where the Coosawattee River enters the Great Valley. The name Coosa applies to the core town, local province, and extended region, and was the most politically important chiefdom in southeastern North America in the 1500s during the time of occupation of the Little Egypt site [Hally et. al., 1989 ]. The oral tradition of Muscogee speakers recognizes two ancestral mother towns, Tukabatchee and Coosa, and particular individuals in present day Creek communities identify themselves as descendants of the mother towns. Muscogee oral tradition and historic documents indicate the area in and around Little Egypt as the paramount chiefdom of Coosa, home to the chief and the core town. Although it cannot be definitively stated that Little Egypt was the core town, size and other attributes single it out as an important site in the Coosa political landscape. The decline in archeological evidence of settlements, including public works and burial goods, in the Coosa area in the early 17th century suggests population decline and movement, perhaps the result of disease. The increase in settlements and the rise of a brushed pottery style that appears to be the melding of several Creek styles suggests that the inhabitants of 16th and early 17th century communities in the Coosa River drainage, as well as those along the Coosawatte and Etowah rivers, including the inhabitants at the Little Egypt site, probably moved southwest to the Lower Coosa River during the late 17th century [Smith, 1987]. Historic documentation indicates that Muscogee speakers were living along the Lower Coosa River at the turn of the 18th century and were likely the descendants of the inhabitants of the Little Egypt site. Present-day Creek communities are the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Muscogee (Creek) Nation, VerDate Aug<18>2005 16:06 Sep 12, 2005 Jkt 205001 Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma. Officials of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 104 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 21,468 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of a death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Victoria Cranner, Senior Collections Manager, Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA 01810, telephone (978) 749–4490 before October 13, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; and Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology is responsible for notifying the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma; and United Keetowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma that this notice has been published. PO 00000 Frm 00072 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Dated: August 4, 2005 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–18073 Filed 9–12–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: School of American Research, Santa Fe, NM National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the School of American Research, Santa Fe, NM. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Santa Fe County, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the School of American Research professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Between 1970 and 1974, human remains representing a minimum of 283 individuals were removed from the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site (LA 12), Santa Fe County, NM, during archeological investigations led by Dr. Douglas Schwartz, School of American E:\FR\FM\13SEN1.SGM 13SEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 176 / Tuesday, September 13, 2005 / Notices Research staff. The excavations were funded primarily through grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Geographic Society. The site was originally owned by the School of American Research and donated to the Archaeological Conservancy in February 2003. The collection from the project, including 120 burials and 163 isolated human remains, are cared for at the School of American Research, except for 425 tree ring samples kept at the Laboratory of Tree Ring Research, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. No known individuals were identified. The 217 lots of associated funerary objects are 6 groups of beads, 20 groups of pottery sherds or ceramic items, 75 deteriorated remains of textiles and/or hides, 6 groups of bark fragments, 39 yucca-fiber mats, 9 lots of faunal bone artifacts, 7 lots of corncobs, 21 groups of lithics, 10 groups of wooden objects fragments, 3 basket fragment groups, 6 lots of vegetal material, 2 lots of combined yucca mats and textiles/ hides, 1 lot of combined corncob and wood ornament, 1 lot of combined corncob and basketry fragment, and 11 groups of unidentifiable organic materials. The Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site was founded circa A.D. 1300. Adobe roomblocks were built forming great plazas. By A.D. 1330, the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site had 24 roomblocks constructed around ten wholly or partially enclosed plazas. By A.D. 1345, possibly due to changes in the annual precipitation, the pueblo was virtually abandoned, occupied by a small remnant and possibly seasonal population. This phase of settlement is referred to as the Component I occupation of Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site. In the 1370s, building on top of the ruins of the site, another phase of settlement began, which is referred to as Component II. Soon after A.D. 1410, the region was again affected by drought and the site was largely abandoned. In circa A.D. 1420, a fire destroyed a large part of the village, and within a few years the second and final occupation of the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site came to an end. The site is within the northern Rio Grande area and located near the pueblo sites of Pecos, San Cristobal, and Pindi. However, no oral traditions affiliate one specific Pueblo with the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site. Physical anthropolgy, archeological investigations, and architecture indicate it was a northern Rio Grande Pueblo site, which potentially links the site to all contemporary Pueblo and Tewa-Hopi groups. VerDate Aug<18>2005 16:06 Sep 12, 2005 Jkt 205001 Extensive literature published by the School of American Research Press in eight separate volumes on the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site, and in Ann M. Palkovich’s Pueblo Population and Society: The Arroyo Hondo Skeletal and Mortuary Remains, James Mackey in Appendix G, ‘‘Arroyo Hondo Population Affinities’’, affiliates the Arroyo Hondo site with the Tewa-Tano linguistic group based on statistical analysis of measurable features of the human remains compared with other contemporary populations. While the biological studies possibly indicate a Tewa-Tano linguistic group, it is certainly possible that the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site, which is within the larger Rio Grande Pueblo tradition and the population movements after the occupation dates, may be linked to any or all of the contemporary Pueblo and Tewa-Hopi groups with whom the School of American Research consulted. The pottery and other material goods reflect a northern Rio Grande tradition. The Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site is a Rio Grande Pueblo site due to the nature of its construction and use of plaza spaces and kivas. Similarities can be seen between the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site and other contemporary sites in the northern Rio Grande. Pueblo and Tewa-Hopi groups are represented today by the federally recognized Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Officials of the School of American Research have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 283 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the School of American Research also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 217 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the School PO 00000 Frm 00073 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 54077 of American Research have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Kathleen Whitaker, School of American Research, PO BOX 2188, Santa Fe, NM 87504, telephone (505) 954–7205, before October 13, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. School of American Research is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of E:\FR\FM\13SEN1.SGM 13SEN1 54078 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 176 / Tuesday, September 13, 2005 / Notices Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: August 3, 2005 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–18082 Filed 9–12–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Missouri-Columbia, Museum of Anthropology, Columbia, MO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the University of Missouri-Columbia, Museum of Anthropology, Columbia, MO. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Vernon County, MO. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Missouri-Columbia, Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with the Osage Tribe, Oklahoma. In 1963, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the Hayes/Coal Pit site (23VE4), Vernon County, MO, during excavations conducted by University of Missouri-Columbia professional staff and supervised field school students. Other excavations at the site did not produce any evidence of human remains or burial areas. No known individuals were identified. The seven associated funerary objects are 3 silver ear bobs/tinklers, 3 small silver band fragments, and 1 small soil sample. VerDate Aug<18>2005 16:06 Sep 12, 2005 Jkt 205001 Based on oral tradition, types of associated funerary objects, and historical documents this individual has been determined to be Native American. The Hayes/Coal Pit site has been identified as a Little Osage village with occupation approximately A.D. 1675 to A.D. 1806. Little Osage village is a village site of the Little Osage tribe based on the presence of trade objects, historical documents, oral tradition, and archeological evidence. Members of the federally recognized Osage Tribe, Oklahoma are the present-day descendants of the Little Osage tribe. Officials of the University of Missouri-Columbia, Museum of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the University of MissouriColumbia, Museum of Anthropology also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the seven objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the University of Missouri-Columbia, Museum of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Osage Tribe, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Michael O’Brien, Director, Museum of Anthropology, 317 Lowry Hall, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211, telephone (573) 882–4421, before October 13, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Osage Tribe, Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. University of Missouri-Columbia, Museum of Anthropology is responsible for notifying the Osage Tribe, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: August 3, 2005 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–18083 Filed 9–12–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S PO 00000 Frm 00074 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Missouri-Columbia, Museum of Anthropology, Columbia, MO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the University of Missouri-Columbia, Museum of Anthropology, Columbia, MO. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Vernon County, MO. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Missouri-Columbia, Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with the Osage Tribe, Oklahoma. In 1963, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from the Brown site (23VE3), Vernon County, MO, during excavations conducted by University of MissouriColumbia professional staff and supervised field school students. Other excavations at the site did not produce any evidence of human remains or burial areas. No known individuals were identified. The 237 associated funerary objects are identified as 200 faunal bones, 3 pottery fragments, 1 brass tinkler, 2 glass fragments, 14 metal fragments that include kettle parts, 1 brass trigger guard, 1 iron screw, 2 glass beads, 4 sandstone abraders (2 conical), 1 hematite fragment, and 8 chert scrapers/modified spalls. The analysis sheet lists the following artifacts associated with this provenience and catalog number that to date have not been located: 1 deer antler tool, 2 arrow point fragments or gun flints, 1 scraper, 1 sandstone mold, and 4 pieces of debitage (4 flakes). Based on oral tradition, types of associated funerary objects, and E:\FR\FM\13SEN1.SGM 13SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 176 (Tuesday, September 13, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 54076-54078]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-18082]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: School of American Research, 
Santa Fe, NM

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the School of American Research, Santa Fe, 
NM. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from 
Santa Fe County, NM.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the School 
of American Research professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and 
Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.
    Between 1970 and 1974, human remains representing a minimum of 283 
individuals were removed from the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site (LA 12), 
Santa Fe County, NM, during archeological investigations led by Dr. 
Douglas Schwartz, School of American

[[Page 54077]]

Research staff. The excavations were funded primarily through grants 
from the National Science Foundation and the National Geographic 
Society. The site was originally owned by the School of American 
Research and donated to the Archaeological Conservancy in February 
2003. The collection from the project, including 120 burials and 163 
isolated human remains, are cared for at the School of American 
Research, except for 425 tree ring samples kept at the Laboratory of 
Tree Ring Research, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. No known 
individuals were identified. The 217 lots of associated funerary 
objects are 6 groups of beads, 20 groups of pottery sherds or ceramic 
items, 75 deteriorated remains of textiles and/or hides, 6 groups of 
bark fragments, 39 yucca-fiber mats, 9 lots of faunal bone artifacts, 7 
lots of corncobs, 21 groups of lithics, 10 groups of wooden objects 
fragments, 3 basket fragment groups, 6 lots of vegetal material, 2 lots 
of combined yucca mats and textiles/hides, 1 lot of combined corncob 
and wood ornament, 1 lot of combined corncob and basketry fragment, and 
11 groups of unidentifiable organic materials.
    The Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site was founded circa A.D. 1300. Adobe 
roomblocks were built forming great plazas. By A.D. 1330, the Arroyo 
Hondo Pueblo site had 24 roomblocks constructed around ten wholly or 
partially enclosed plazas. By A.D. 1345, possibly due to changes in the 
annual precipitation, the pueblo was virtually abandoned, occupied by a 
small remnant and possibly seasonal population. This phase of 
settlement is referred to as the Component I occupation of Arroyo Hondo 
Pueblo site. In the 1370s, building on top of the ruins of the site, 
another phase of settlement began, which is referred to as Component 
II. Soon after A.D. 1410, the region was again affected by drought and 
the site was largely abandoned. In circa A.D. 1420, a fire destroyed a 
large part of the village, and within a few years the second and final 
occupation of the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site came to an end.
    The site is within the northern Rio Grande area and located near 
the pueblo sites of Pecos, San Cristobal, and Pindi. However, no oral 
traditions affiliate one specific Pueblo with the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo 
site. Physical anthropolgy, archeological investigations, and 
architecture indicate it was a northern Rio Grande Pueblo site, which 
potentially links the site to all contemporary Pueblo and Tewa-Hopi 
groups.
    Extensive literature published by the School of American Research 
Press in eight separate volumes on the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site, and in 
Ann M. Palkovich's Pueblo Population and Society: The Arroyo Hondo 
Skeletal and Mortuary Remains, James Mackey in Appendix G, ``Arroyo 
Hondo Population Affinities'', affiliates the Arroyo Hondo site with 
the Tewa-Tano linguistic group based on statistical analysis of 
measurable features of the human remains compared with other 
contemporary populations. While the biological studies possibly 
indicate a Tewa-Tano linguistic group, it is certainly possible that 
the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site, which is within the larger Rio Grande 
Pueblo tradition and the population movements after the occupation 
dates, may be linked to any or all of the contemporary Pueblo and Tewa-
Hopi groups with whom the School of American Research consulted.
    The pottery and other material goods reflect a northern Rio Grande 
tradition. The Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site is a Rio Grande Pueblo site due 
to the nature of its construction and use of plaza spaces and kivas. 
Similarities can be seen between the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo site and other 
contemporary sites in the northern Rio Grande.
    Pueblo and Tewa-Hopi groups are represented today by the federally 
recognized Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa 
Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo 
Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni 
Reservation, New Mexico.
    Officials of the School of American Research have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above 
represent the physical remains of 283 individuals of Native American 
ancestry. Officials of the School of American Research also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 217 objects 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the School of American 
Research have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is 
a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Dr. Kathleen Whitaker, School of American 
Research, PO BOX 2188, Santa Fe, NM 87504, telephone (505) 954-7205, 
before October 13, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains and 
associated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of 
Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San 
Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa 
Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; 
and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after 
that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    School of American Research is responsible for notifying the Hopi 
Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San 
Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San 
Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of

[[Page 54078]]

Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published.

    Dated: August 3, 2005
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 05-18082 Filed 9-12-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S