60-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information; Opportunity for Public Comment, 52443-52444 [05-17487]

Download as PDF 52443 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 170 / Friday, September 2, 2005 / Notices Sec. 2 Prohibited Acts a. You must not discharge or use firearms or other dangerous weapons for the purpose of target shooting. This does not include the discharge of firearms or dangerous weapons while person(s) are engaged in bona fide hunting activities during established hunting seasons and are properly licensed for these activities. b. You must not use or possess to use any glass containers outside of enclosed vehicles, camp trailers, or tents. c. You must not use or possess to use as firewood any materials containing nails, screws, or other metal hardware, including, but not limited to, wood pallets and/or construction debris. d. You must not use an accelerant for the purposes of igniting a campfire. However, you may ignite any campfire or other material used for cooking purposes, by using any commercially purchased charcoal igniter or other nonhazardous fuels. e. You must not drive a motor vehicle through any campfire, or through any flaming debris or other flaming material(s). f. You must not burn any potentially hazardous material including, but not limited to, gasoline, oil, plastic, and magnesium. g. You must not ignite a campfire outside the confines of a fire pan or other container. All ashes and unburned fuel from campfires may be disposed of in a small pit excavated with hand tools as long as the material being disposed of is mostly ash. You must not dispose of non-flammable materials in a fire on public lands. BLM may authorize large bonfires, which would go beyond the limit of a fire pan, by permit on a caseby-case basis. h. You must not operate a motorized vehicle in excess of the posted speed limit on any maintained roadway within the SRMA. i. You must not operate a motorized vehicle in excess of 15 m.p.h. off of established or maintained roadways within 50 feet of any animals, people, or vehicles. j. You must not operate or use any audio device, including, but not limited to, a radio, television, musical instrument, other noise producing device, or motorized equipment between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. in a manner that makes unreasonable noise that disturbs other visitors. k. You must not operate an offhighway vehicle without a properly installed spark arrestor. l. You must not use or possess any man-made ramp or jump, for the purposes of performing acrobatic or aerial stunts. VerDate Aug<18>2005 18:00 Sep 01, 2005 Jkt 205001 m. You must not enter, camp, park or stay longer than one half hour within the SRMA without properly paying required permit fees. Permits must be purchased and visibly displayed in the windshield of all primary vehicles with the date side facing out. n. You must not camp or use motorized vehicles within 200 feet of any perennial water source or impoundment. improved, streamlined program, but may also serve as a model for other Federal agencies. Sec. 3 Penalties Any person who violates any of these supplementary rules may be tried before a United States Magistrate and fined no more than $1,000 or imprisoned for no more than 12 months, or both. 43 U.S.C. 1733(a); 43 CFR 8360.0–7. Such violations may also be subject to the enhanced fines provided for by 18 U.S.C. 3571. Under provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 and 5 CFR part 1320, Reporting and Record Keeping Requirements, the NPS invites comments on the need for gathering the information in the proposed survey. Comments are invited on: (1) The practical utility of the information being gathered; (2) the accuracy of the burden hour estimate; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden to respondents, including use of automated information collection techniques or other forms of information technology. DATES: Public comments will be accepted on or before November 1, 2005. Send Comments To: Joy M. Pietschmann, National Park Service, Servicewide Volunteer Program Coordinator, 1849 C Street NW., 2450, Washington, DC 20240. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joy M. Pietschmann, 202–513–7141. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: National Park Service Volunteers-InParks Program Assessment. OMB Number: To be requested. Expiration Date: To be requested. Type of Request: Request for new clearance. Description of Need: The NPS Volunteers-In-Parks program is authorized by the Volunteers in the Parks Act of 1969 (16 U.S.C. 18g–18j). The Volunteers in the Parks Act of 1969 as originally enacted was Public Law 91–357. Volunteering is an American tradition that over the years has made an immeasurable contribution to communities, organizations, and individuals throughout the country. Volunteers are vital to the success of the NPS. The VIP program can accept and use voluntary help and services from the public, in a way that is mutually beneficial to the NPS and the volunteer. In FY2004 140,000 volunteers donated 5 million hours of service to their national parks at a value of $85.9 million. VIPs come from every state and many different countries to help preserve and protect America’s natural and cultural Dated: June 15, 2005. Sally Wisely, State Director. [FR Doc. 05–17507 Filed 9–1–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–DK–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service 60-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information; Opportunity for Public Comment Department of the Interior, National Park Service. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The National Park Service (NPS) Volunteers-In-Parks (VIP) program (Pub. L. 91–357) is collecting information from volunteers in the form of a survey for the purposes of evaluating the program and its effectiveness. In order to effectively manage the increasing trend of volunteerism in the NPS, it is imperative that the agency assess its strengths and weaknesses and determine methods for improved efficiency. A servicewide volunteer program assessment has not been conducted to date. Current VIPs will be surveyed (mail-back/Internet-based questionnaire) during this process to collect information about the current status and needs of the program. In addition, follow-up focus groups (3 with up to 20 participants each) and telephone interviews (up to 40) will be conducted to acquire detailed data expanding on questionnaire results). Recommendations for improvements will be made based on the findings. This process will not only aid in creating an PO 00000 Frm 00083 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Estimated numbers of Responses Volunteers-In-Parks Program Assessment E:\FR\FM\02SEN1.SGM 02SEN1 6,100 Burden hours 1,630 52444 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 170 / Friday, September 2, 2005 / Notices heritage for the enjoyment of this and future generations. Over the past 35 years, this program has consistently grown to become one of the government’s largest, most successful volunteer programs. Between FY2003 and 2004, the program experienced its biggest increase in history: The number of VIPs increased by 14% and the number of hours by 11%. In order to effectively manage the increasing trend of volunteerism in the NPS, it is imperative that the organization assess its strengths and weaknesses and determine methods for improved efficiency. A servicewide volunteer program assessment has not been conducted to date. Volunteers (6,000) will be surveyed during this process (mail-back/Internet-based questionnaire) to collect information about the current status and needs of the program. In addition, follow-up focus groups (3 with up to 20 participants each) and telephone interviews (up to 40) will be conducted to acquire detailed data expanding on questionnaire results). Results will be reported at the servicewide level, the regional level (seven NPS regions), and the volunteer work category level (to include, at minimum, work in the areas of interpretation, natural resource management, park maintenance, campground hosting, and cultural resource management). Recommendations for improvements will be made based on the findings. This process will not only aid in creating an improved, streamlined program, but may also serve as a model for other Federal agencies. Automated data collection: This information will primarily be collected electronically through a designated, secure Web site. Non-automated methods (mail-back questionnaire) will be available for those without access to electronic means. Description of respondents: National Park Service Volunteers-In-Parks. Estimated average number of respondents: Approximately 6,100 respondents. Estimated average number of responses: Approximately 6,100 responses. Estimated average burden hours per response: One-quarter burden hour per response to the mail-back/internet-based questionnaire (≈6,000 responses); One and one-half burden hour for participants in the follow-up focus groups (≈60 responses); One burden hour for participants in the follow-up interviews (≈responses). Frequency of Response: 1 time per respondent. VerDate Aug<18>2005 18:00 Sep 01, 2005 Jkt 205001 Estimated annual reporting burden: 1,630 hours. Dated: July 19, 2005. Leonard E. Stowe, National Park Service Information Collection Clearance Officer. [FR Doc. 05–17487 Filed 9–1–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement/ General Management Plan: Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Island County, WA; Notice of Availability SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332(C), and the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR part 1500–1508), the National Park Service has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the proposed general management plan for Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve (Reserve) located in northwestern Washington. In addition to a ‘‘no-action’’ alternative (which would maintain current management), the Draft EIS describes and analyzes two ‘‘action’’ alternatives which respond to public concerns and issues identified during the scoping process, as well as NPS’s conservation planning requirements. These alternatives present varying management strategies that address visitor use and preservation of cultural and natural resources that protect and reflect the rural community on Whidbey Island from 19th century exploration and settlement in Puget Sound to the present time. The potential environmental consequences of each alternative, and mitigation strategies, are identified and analyzed; a determination as to the ‘‘environmentally preferred’’ alternative is also provided in the Draft EIS. Scoping: A Notice of Intent announcing preparation of the Draft EIS and general management plan was published in the Federal Register on May 22, 2000. Public involvement has included public meetings, presentations and meetings with organizations located within the Reserve and additional organizations, newsletter mailings, local press releases, website postings, and postcards. Preceding the formal EIS analysis process, the NPS had organized an interdisciplinary planning team to initiate the general management plan process for the Reserve. The team included the Reserve’s Trust Board and staff, representatives from Washington PO 00000 Frm 00084 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 State, Island County and Town of Coupeville, and NPS staff from the Pacific West Region Office in Seattle, Washington. The purpose of these initial meetings was to help characterize the scale and extent of the planning process. The formal public scoping efforts began in June 2000 with release of a scoping newsletter to approximately 650 people on the Reserve’s mailing list. In addition, over 2800 newsletters were distributed at local public places such as libraries, civic buildings, businesses, and parks. The planning team received 36 letters during the official public scoping period ending August 15, 2000. In addition, during June 2000, three public scoping meetings were held in Seattle, Washington and Coupeville, Washington (in total, 141 verbal comments were recorded). Individual scoping meetings were also held between August 2000 and January 2001 with organizations located within the Reserve to discuss issues of mutual interest. Other meetings with other interested organizations were also scheduled. Proposed Plan and Alternatives: Alternative A constitutes the No-Action alternative and serves as an environmental baseline to facilitate comparisons between the ‘‘action’’ alternatives. Alternative A assumes that existing programs, facilities, staffing, and funding would generally continue at their current levels. The NPS would dispose of NPS-owned and managed farms within the Reserve to the private sector after placing conservation easements on them. Alternative B is the ‘‘agency preferred’’ alternative. The Reserve’s Trust Board, and the NPS, in cooperation with partners, would enhance existing programs and resources management, as well as administrative, maintenance, and visitor services within the Reserve. To maintain and protect the rural landscape, the NPS would continue to purchase conservation easements on priority properties based upon a new land protection plan. The NPS would exchange NPS-owned farms to private farm owners for additional protection on other properties within the Reserve. Historic buildings would be rehabilitated to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards. The county would be encouraged to develop a zoning overlay for the Reserve to aid in land use control. In addition, a minor boundary adjustment would be recommended. To orient and inform visitors about the Reserve, three gateway kiosks would be developed along State Route 20 and a visitor center/contact E:\FR\FM\02SEN1.SGM 02SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 170 (Friday, September 2, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52443-52444]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-17487]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


60-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of 
Information; Opportunity for Public Comment

AGENCY: Department of the Interior, National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice and request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The National Park Service (NPS) Volunteers-In-Parks (VIP) 
program (Pub. L. 91-357) is collecting information from volunteers in 
the form of a survey for the purposes of evaluating the program and its 
effectiveness. In order to effectively manage the increasing trend of 
volunteerism in the NPS, it is imperative that the agency assess its 
strengths and weaknesses and determine methods for improved efficiency. 
A servicewide volunteer program assessment has not been conducted to 
date. Current VIPs will be surveyed (mail-back/Internet-based 
questionnaire) during this process to collect information about the 
current status and needs of the program. In addition, follow-up focus 
groups (3 with up to 20 participants each) and telephone interviews (up 
to 40) will be conducted to acquire detailed data expanding on 
questionnaire results). Recommendations for improvements will be made 
based on the findings. This process will not only aid in creating an 
improved, streamlined program, but may also serve as a model for other 
Federal agencies.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      Estimated  numbers
                                                              of
                                                     -------------------
                                                                  Burden
                                                      Responses   hours
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Volunteers-In-Parks Program Assessment..............      6,100    1,630
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Under provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 and 5 CFR 
part 1320, Reporting and Record Keeping Requirements, the NPS invites 
comments on the need for gathering the information in the proposed 
survey. Comments are invited on: (1) The practical utility of the 
information being gathered; (2) the accuracy of the burden hour 
estimate; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden to 
respondents, including use of automated information collection 
techniques or other forms of information technology.

DATES: Public comments will be accepted on or before November 1, 2005.
    Send Comments To: Joy M. Pietschmann, National Park Service, 
Servicewide Volunteer Program Coordinator, 1849 C Street NW., 2450, 
Washington, DC 20240.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joy M. Pietschmann, 202-513-7141.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: National Park Service Volunteers-In-
Parks Program Assessment.
    OMB Number: To be requested.
    Expiration Date: To be requested.
    Type of Request: Request for new clearance.
    Description of Need: The NPS Volunteers-In-Parks program is 
authorized by the Volunteers in the Parks Act of 1969 (16 U.S.C. 18g-
18j). The Volunteers in the Parks Act of 1969 as originally enacted was 
Public Law 91-357. Volunteering is an American tradition that over the 
years has made an immeasurable contribution to communities, 
organizations, and individuals throughout the country. Volunteers are 
vital to the success of the NPS. The VIP program can accept and use 
voluntary help and services from the public, in a way that is mutually 
beneficial to the NPS and the volunteer. In FY2004 140,000 volunteers 
donated 5 million hours of service to their national parks at a value 
of $85.9 million. VIPs come from every state and many different 
countries to help preserve and protect America's natural and cultural

[[Page 52444]]

heritage for the enjoyment of this and future generations. Over the 
past 35 years, this program has consistently grown to become one of the 
government's largest, most successful volunteer programs. Between 
FY2003 and 2004, the program experienced its biggest increase in 
history: The number of VIPs increased by 14% and the number of hours by 
11%. In order to effectively manage the increasing trend of 
volunteerism in the NPS, it is imperative that the organization assess 
its strengths and weaknesses and determine methods for improved 
efficiency. A servicewide volunteer program assessment has not been 
conducted to date. Volunteers (6,000) will be surveyed during this 
process (mail-back/Internet-based questionnaire) to collect information 
about the current status and needs of the program. In addition, follow-
up focus groups (3 with up to 20 participants each) and telephone 
interviews (up to 40) will be conducted to acquire detailed data 
expanding on questionnaire results). Results will be reported at the 
servicewide level, the regional level (seven NPS regions), and the 
volunteer work category level (to include, at minimum, work in the 
areas of interpretation, natural resource management, park maintenance, 
campground hosting, and cultural resource management). Recommendations 
for improvements will be made based on the findings. This process will 
not only aid in creating an improved, streamlined program, but may also 
serve as a model for other Federal agencies.
    Automated data collection: This information will primarily be 
collected electronically through a designated, secure Web site. Non-
automated methods (mail-back questionnaire) will be available for those 
without access to electronic means.
    Description of respondents: National Park Service Volunteers-In-
Parks.
    Estimated average number of respondents: Approximately 6,100 
respondents.
    Estimated average number of responses: Approximately 6,100 
responses.
    Estimated average burden hours per response: One-quarter burden 
hour per response to the mail-back/internet-based questionnaire 
([ap]6,000 responses); One and one-half burden hour for participants in 
the follow-up focus groups ([ap]60 responses); One burden hour for 
participants in the follow-up interviews ([ap]responses).
    Frequency of Response: 1 time per respondent.
    Estimated annual reporting burden: 1,630 hours.

    Dated: July 19, 2005.
Leonard E. Stowe,
National Park Service Information Collection Clearance Officer.
[FR Doc. 05-17487 Filed 9-1-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P