Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI, 44687-44688 [05-15323]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 148 / Wednesday, August 3, 2005 / Notices Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Frank E. Wozniak, NAGPRA Coordinator, Southwestern Region, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, 333 Broadway Boulevard, SE, Albuquerque, NM 87102, telephone (505) 842–3238, before September 2, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: July 13, 2005 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–15316 Filed 8–2–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM, and Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM, and in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, that meets the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary object’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. The cultural item was removed from the Gila National Forest, Catron County, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. VerDate jul<14>2003 15:22 Aug 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 The cultural item is a turquoise pendant consisting of 19 small pieces of perforated turquoise. A detailed assessment of the cultural item was made by U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest and Field Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. In 1939, one turquoise pendant was removed from the SU site in the Gila National Forest, Catron County, NM, during legally authorized excavations and collected by Dr. Paul S. Martin of the Field Museum, Chicago, IL. Material culture, architecture and site organization indicate that the SU site is an Upland Mogollon pithouse village occupied between A.D. 450 and 500. The territory of the Upland Mogollon stretched from south-central Arizona to south-central New Mexico. The Upland Mogollon territories are claimed, currently inhabited, or used by the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Villages had pithouses or pueblo-style houses. Most archeological evidence linking Upland Mogollon to present-day tribes relies on ceramics that suggest the early establishment of brownware producing groups. Present-day descendants of the Upland Mogollon are the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Oral traditions presented by representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico support cultural affiliation. Additional unassociated funerary objects removed from Gila National Forest, Catron County, NM, were published in a Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items in the Federal Register of June 1, 2005, FR Doc 05– 10805, page 31510. Officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the one cultural item described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be PO 00000 Frm 00135 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 44687 reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary object and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with this unassociated funerary object should contact Dr. Frank E. Wozniak, NAGPRA Coordinator, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service, 333 Broadway Blvd., SE, Albuquerque, NM 87102, telephone (505) 842–3238, before September 2, 2005. Repatriation of this unassociated funerary object to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: July 13, 2005 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–15322 Filed 8–2–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI, that meets the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary object’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. In 1937, Emma Turnbull removed a cultural item in the sands of a West Molokai beach, Molokai Island, HI. The cultural item is one rock oyster pendant. E:\FR\FM\03AUN1.SGM 03AUN1 44688 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 148 / Wednesday, August 3, 2005 / Notices It is believed that Ms. Turnbull most likely found the pendant in an area known as Mo’omomi. In 1976, Ms. Turnbull’s daughter, Mrs. J.D. Korsund, wrote to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum requesting information on the pendant and mentioned that the pendant was found in an area that had human remains. In 1985, Ms. Turnbull sent a letter to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum stating that she was sending the pendant as a gift to the museum and that there were many bones in the area where she picked up the pendant. In June of that same year, Ms. Turnbull signed the deed of gift for the pendant to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum. The Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum has classified the pendant as a ‘‘niho palaoa’’ due to its similarity in shape to other Hawaiian pendants usually made from animal ivory or whale teeth. Consultation was held with the representatives of the Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei, Maui/Lanai Island Burial Council, Molokai Island Burial Council, Na Lei Ali’i Kawananakoa, and Royal Hawaiian Academy of Traditional Arts. Based on Ms. Turnbull’s description that the pendant was found in an area with evidence of burials, it was concluded during consultation that this pendant may be classified as an unassociated funerary object. Officials of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the one cultural item described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and is believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native Hawaiian individual. Officials of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary object and the Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei, Na Lei Ali’i Kawananakoa, and Royal Hawaiian Academy of Traditional Arts. Representatives of any other Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary object should contact Betty Kam, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu, HI, 96817, telephone (808) 848–4144, before September 2, 2005. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary object to Hui VerDate jul<14>2003 15:22 Aug 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei, Na Lei Ali’i Kawananakoa, and Royal Hawaiian Academy of Traditional Arts may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum is responsible for notifying the Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei, Maui/Lanai Island Burial Council, Molokai Island Burial Council, Na Lei Ali’i Kawananakoa, and Royal Hawaiian Academy of Traditional Arts that this notice has been published. Dated: July 5, 2005 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–15323 Filed 8–2–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ. The human remains were removed from a vandalized cremation burial near Dripping Spring in the Puerto Blanco Mountains, Pima County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations within this notice are the sole responsibility of the superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River PimaMaricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. The Ak-Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak-Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona was represented by members of the Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona. PO 00000 Frm 00136 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In 1967, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from a site in Pima County, AZ. A National Park Service employee collected burned and fragmented human remains from a vandalized cremation burial near Dripping Springs in the Puerto Blanco Mountains of Arizona. The fragments were recovered from the surface of a pit-like depression at the base of a natural wall-like outcrop on a ridge top. Since collection, the human remains have always been in National Park Service control. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The cremation represents an adult of unknown sex. Based on the burial type and location, as well as available archeological and historical information, it is likely that the remains are Native American. Cremations are characteristic of prehistoric Hohokam funerary practices in this region. During consultation, representatives from the above mentioned tribes stated that their oral traditions say they are culturally affiliated with the Hohokam. The ethnographic, archeological, and historical evidence supports their claim of cultural affiliation. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is located in the western Papagueria of the Sonora Desert Subsection of the Basin and Range Province. The Papagueria is an area that extended from west of Tucson, AZ to the Colorado River and south of the Gila River to the Rocky Point Region. It is further subdivided, based on archeology and climate, into the eastern and western Papagueria. The western Papagueria is the most arid portion of the Sonoran Desert and ranges from south of the Gila River to Rocky Point and from the Ajo Mountains to the Colorado River. The Akimel O’odham (Pima), Tohono O’odham and the Hia-Ced O’odham claim to be the descendants of the Hohokam. Their oral history documents the end time of the Hohokam, when armies from the south and southeast gathered and marched on the Great House communities (Casa Grande, Mesa Grande, Pueblo Grande) and cast out the priestly societies. The armies intermarried with the Hohokam and became the O’odham people. The AkChin Indian Community is composed primarily of Akimel and Tohono O’odham, and a few families of Hia-Ced O’odham. The Gila River Indian Community and the Salt River PimaMaricopa Community are both composed of Akimel O’odham along with small populations of Maricopa who moved from the central portion of the Gila River around Gila Bend to join E:\FR\FM\03AUN1.SGM 03AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 148 (Wednesday, August 3, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 44687-44688]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-15323]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Bernice Pauahi 
Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Bernice Pauahi 
Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI, that meets the definition of 
``unassociated funerary object'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    In 1937, Emma Turnbull removed a cultural item in the sands of a 
West Molokai beach, Molokai Island, HI. The cultural item is one rock 
oyster pendant.

[[Page 44688]]

 It is believed that Ms. Turnbull most likely found the pendant in an 
area known as Mo'omomi. In 1976, Ms. Turnbull's daughter, Mrs. J.D. 
Korsund, wrote to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum requesting 
information on the pendant and mentioned that the pendant was found in 
an area that had human remains. In 1985, Ms. Turnbull sent a letter to 
the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum stating that she was sending the 
pendant as a gift to the museum and that there were many bones in the 
area where she picked up the pendant. In June of that same year, Ms. 
Turnbull signed the deed of gift for the pendant to the Bernice Pauahi 
Bishop Museum. The Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum has classified the 
pendant as a ``niho palaoa'' due to its similarity in shape to other 
Hawaiian pendants usually made from animal ivory or whale teeth.
    Consultation was held with the representatives of the Hui Malama I 
Na Kupuna O Hawai'i Nei, Maui/Lanai Island Burial Council, Molokai 
Island Burial Council, Na Lei Ali'i Kawananakoa, and Royal Hawaiian 
Academy of Traditional Arts. Based on Ms. Turnbull's description that 
the pendant was found in an area with evidence of burials, it was 
concluded during consultation that this pendant may be classified as an 
unassociated funerary object.

    Officials of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the one cultural item described 
above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony and is believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
Hawaiian individual. Officials of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum also 
have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the unassociated funerary object and the Hui Malama I Na Kupuna 
O Hawai'i Nei, Na Lei Ali'i Kawananakoa, and Royal Hawaiian Academy of 
Traditional Arts.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the 
unassociated funerary object should contact Betty Kam, Bernice Pauahi 
Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu, HI, 96817, telephone 
(808) 848-4144, before September 2, 2005. Repatriation of the 
unassociated funerary object to Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai'i Nei, 
Na Lei Ali'i Kawananakoa, and Royal Hawaiian Academy of Traditional 
Arts may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum is responsible for notifying the Hui 
Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai'i Nei, Maui/Lanai Island Burial Council, 
Molokai Island Burial Council, Na Lei Ali'i Kawananakoa, and Royal 
Hawaiian Academy of Traditional Arts that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: July 5, 2005
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 05-15323 Filed 8-2-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S