Notice of Inventory Completion: Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division, Jackson, MS, 35451-35452 [05-12029]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 117 / Monday, June 20, 2005 / Notices The size and location of remaining cropland would be based on the need to control invasive plants, especially Canada thistle. Grasslands infested with Canada thistle would be tilled and planted with native vegetation or dense nesting cover after the area is considered clear of viable Canada thistle seed. Canada thistle should be much more contained than it is currently, reducing the potential for a thistle seed source to invade adjacent or downstream private lands. Watershed-level conservation efforts through partnerships may result in a long-term reduction of sediment entering the James River and refuge. Sedimentation rates near the Mud Lake dike are expected to remain elevated near current levels in the short term, thereby continuing to degrade the wetland functions of Mud Lake. The ability to cycle vegetation and create an interspersion of cover and water to meet objectives in Mud Lake through current water-level manipulations would be hindered. Reduced invertebrate production may impact nutrient cycling and overall wetland productivity, as well as limit a major food source for waterfowl and other wildlife. Wildlife-dependent recreational and educational activities would be expanded and improved on- and offrefuge. The building of an education and visitor center would allow visitors a quality experience and provide a focus point for public use on the refuge. All hunting and fishing seasons would continue as presently managed. Support facilities, including parking, for hunting and fishing opportunities would be improved. The review and comment period is 30 calendar days commencing with publication of this Notice of Availability in the Federal Register. After the review and comment period for this Draft CCP/ EA, all comments will be analyzed and considered by the Service. All comments received from individuals on the Environmental Assessment become part of the official public record. Requests for such comments will be handled in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act, the Council on Environmental Quality’s NEPA regulations (40 CFR 1506.6(f)) and other Service and Departmental policies and procedures. Dated: May 26, 2005. Ron Shupe, Regional Director, Region 6, Denver, CO. [FR Doc. 05–12061 Filed 6–17–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P VerDate jul<14>2003 17:24 Jun 17, 2005 Jkt 205001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division, Jackson, MS National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division, Jackson, MS. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Lee County, MS. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma. In the summer of 1937, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the Alston-Wilson site (MLe14), by Moreau Chambers, an archeologist with the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, as part of an ongoing survey and legally authorized excavation of Chickasaw sites in Lee County, MS. The excavation and survey were undertaken to study Chickasaw culture and find the location of the Battle of Ackia as part of the process for establishing Ackia Battleground National Monument. No known individual was identified. The two associated funerary objects are one bent cuprous metal band (sheet brass ring) found around the bone fragment and one pottery sherd. The Alston-Wilson site, now better known as MLe14 because of later excavations by Jesse Jennings in 1939 on behalf of the National Park Service, has a major occupation dating to A.D. 1730– 1750. Archeological evidence found at the Alston-Wilson site suggests that this site was part of a major historic PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 35451 Chickasaw village. In the 1730s, there were two major villages in the vicinity of the Alston-Wilson site that were occupied by the Chickasaw: Tchichatala and Falatchao. Tchichatala was a major Chickasaw village. Falatchao was a ‘‘white mother’’ town meaning it was both a ‘‘white’’ town (or a peace town, as opposed to a ‘‘red’’ war town) and a ‘‘mother’’ town from which other towns emerged (Hudson 1976: 238–239). Both Tchichatala and Falatchao are recognized in historical documents as being occupied by the Chickasaw. However, because of the fluid nature of Chickasaw village occupation, it is difficult to identify the specific boundaries of historic Chickasaw villages. Therefore, based on the archeological evidence that the site was part of a major Chickasaw village and at that time both villages were in the area, the Alston-Wilson site is most probably part of either the site of the village of Tchichatala or Falatchao. (Atkinson 1985, 2004; Brad Lieb, personal communication 2004; Cook et al. 1980; Jennings 1941; Johnson et al. 2004). Furthermore, based on historical evidence that Lee County, MS, where the Alston-Wilson site is located, was occupied by the Chickasaw until their removal to Oklahoma from 1837 until 1850, the site is probably Chickasaw. The Chickasaws are represented by the present-day Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma. Officials of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the two objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Pamela D. Edwards, Curator of Archaeological Collections, Mississippi E:\FR\FM\20JNN1.SGM 20JNN1 35452 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 117 / Monday, June 20, 2005 / Notices Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division, P.O. Box 571, Jackson, MS 39205, telephone (601) 576–6940, before July 20, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division is responsible for notifying the Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: May 31, 2005. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–12029 Filed 6–17–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Lower Yuba River Accord, Yuba County, CA Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement/ Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) and to hold public scoping meetings. AGENCY: SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) proposes to participate and serve as the lead agency under NEPA in the preparation of a joint EIS/EIR on the Lower Yuba River Accord (Yuba Accord). The Yuba County Water Agency (YCWA), a local public water agency, is proposing the project and will serve as the lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The purpose of the Yuba Accord is to resolve instream flow issues associated with operation of the Yuba River Development Project (Yuba Project) in a way that protects and enhances lower Yuba River fisheries and local water-supply reliability, while providing revenues for local floodcontrol and water-supply projects, water for the CALFED Program to use for protection and restoration of Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) fisheries, and improvements in statewide water supply management, including supplemental water for the Central Valley Project (CVP) and the State Water Project (SWP). This notice is published in accordance with NEPA regulations found in 40 CFR 1501.7. The purpose of this notice is to obtain suggestions and VerDate jul<14>2003 17:24 Jun 17, 2005 Jkt 205001 information from other agencies and the public on the scope of issues to be addressed in the EIS/EIR. A similar notice is being published by YCWA in accordance with CEQA. Comments and participation in the scoping process are encouraged. DATES: Four public scoping meetings will be held on the following dates: • July 19, 2005–1 p.m., Sacramento, CA • July 19, 2005–6:30 p.m., Sacramento, CA • July 20, 2005–1 p.m., Marysville, CA • July 20, 2005–6:30 p.m., Marysville, CA ADDRESSES: The public scoping meeting locations are: • Sacramento—Doubletree Hotel, 2001 Point West Way, Sacramento, CA • Marysville—Yuba County Government Center, 915 8th Street, Marysville, CA Written comments on the scope of the Yuba Accord or issues to be addressed in the EIR/EIS must be received no later than August 4, 2005. Send written comments to Mary Grim, Bureau of Reclamation, 2800 Cottage Way, MP– 400, Sacramento, CA 95825. Grim, Bureau of Reclamation, 2800 Cottage Way, MP–400, Sacramento, CA 95825. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mary Grim, Environmental Specialist, Reclamation, at the above address; telephone number 916–978–5204. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: YCWA is a public agency created and existing pursuant to the provisions of the Yuba County Water Agency Act of 1959. YCWA owns and operates the Yuba Project, which includes New Bullards Bar Dam and Reservoir on the North Yuba River. YCWA operates the Yuba Project in accordance with a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission License, flood control rules promulgated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, state water rights permit terms, and an agreement with the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) for instream flows. In March of 1991, CDFG released a ‘‘Lower Yuba River Fisheries Management Plan’’, which contained recommendations regarding fishery protection and enhancement measures in the lower 24-mile section of the Yuba River. CDFG requested that the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) consider modifying YCWA’s water rights permits to implement the recommendations contained in CDFG’s Plan. Based on CDFG’s request, and to address various allegations raised by a coalition of non-governmental fisheries organizations (NGOs) against several PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 water agencies in 1989 filings, the SWRCB initiated a proceeding to consider fishery protection and water right issues on the lower Yuba River in early 1992. The SWRCB held hearings on these issues in 1992 and 2000. The SWRCB adopted Water Rights Decision 1644 (D– 1644) on March 1, 2001. D–1644 established new instream flow requirements for the lower Yuba River in YCWA’s water right permits, required YCWA to take actions to address potential concerns regarding water temperatures for Chinook salmon and steelhead, and required studies and consultation on various other issues. YCWA, several local water districts in Yuba County, and a collective of fisheries NGOs all initiated legal actions challenging D–1644 on a variety of issues. After considering some new evidence, the court remanded D–1644 to the SWRCB for reconsideration in light of the new evidence. After a brief hearing in 2003, the SWRCB issued Revised Water Rights Decision 1644 (RD–1644), which contains only minor changes from D–1644. The same parties that had challenged D–1644 then initiated new legal proceedings challenging RD–1644 on most of the same issues. Since RD–1644 was issued, the parties to the litigation and the state and Federal fisheries agencies have been engaged in a collaborative, interestbased initiative to try to resolve the flow and other fisheries issues on the lower Yuba River. The potential settlement has become known as the Yuba Accord. If implemented, the Yuba Accord would resolve issues associated with operation of the Yuba Project in a way that would protect and enhance lower Yuba River fisheries, protect local water supply reliability, provide revenues for local flood-control and water-supply projects, provide water for protection and restoration of Delta fisheries, and increase state-wide water supplies. The Yuba Accord would include three major elements: • The first element would be an agreement (Yuba Accord Fisheries Agreement) between YCWA, CDFG and the collective of NGOs, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service supporting the agreement. Under the Yuba Accord Fisheries Agreement, YCWA would revise the operation of the Yuba Project to provide higher flows in the lower Yuba River to protect and enhance fisheries and to increase downstream water supplies. E:\FR\FM\20JNN1.SGM 20JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 117 (Monday, June 20, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 35451-35452]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-12029]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Mississippi Department of 
Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division, Jackson, MS

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the Mississippi Department of Archives and 
History, Historic Preservation Division, Jackson, MS. The human remains 
and associated funerary objects were removed from Lee County, MS.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation 
Division professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma.
    In the summer of 1937, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from the Alston-Wilson site (MLe14), by Moreau 
Chambers, an archeologist with the Mississippi Department of Archives 
and History, as part of an ongoing survey and legally authorized 
excavation of Chickasaw sites in Lee County, MS. The excavation and 
survey were undertaken to study Chickasaw culture and find the location 
of the Battle of Ackia as part of the process for establishing Ackia 
Battleground National Monument. No known individual was identified. The 
two associated funerary objects are one bent cuprous metal band (sheet 
brass ring) found around the bone fragment and one pottery sherd.
    The Alston-Wilson site, now better known as MLe14 because of later 
excavations by Jesse Jennings in 1939 on behalf of the National Park 
Service, has a major occupation dating to A.D. 1730-1750. Archeological 
evidence found at the Alston-Wilson site suggests that this site was 
part of a major historic Chickasaw village. In the 1730s, there were 
two major villages in the vicinity of the Alston-Wilson site that were 
occupied by the Chickasaw: Tchichatala and Falatchao. Tchichatala was a 
major Chickasaw village. Falatchao was a ``white mother'' town meaning 
it was both a ``white'' town (or a peace town, as opposed to a ``red'' 
war town) and a ``mother'' town from which other towns emerged (Hudson 
1976: 238-239).
    Both Tchichatala and Falatchao are recognized in historical 
documents as being occupied by the Chickasaw. However, because of the 
fluid nature of Chickasaw village occupation, it is difficult to 
identify the specific boundaries of historic Chickasaw villages. 
Therefore, based on the archeological evidence that the site was part 
of a major Chickasaw village and at that time both villages were in the 
area, the Alston-Wilson site is most probably part of either the site 
of the village of Tchichatala or Falatchao. (Atkinson 1985, 2004; Brad 
Lieb, personal communication 2004; Cook et al. 1980; Jennings 1941; 
Johnson et al. 2004). Furthermore, based on historical evidence that 
Lee County, MS, where the Alston-Wilson site is located, was occupied 
by the Chickasaw until their removal to Oklahoma from 1837 until 1850, 
the site is probably Chickasaw. The Chickasaws are represented by the 
present-day Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma.
    Officials of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, 
Historic Preservation Division have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above represent the 
physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. 
Officials of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, 
Historic Preservation Division also have determined that, pursuant to 
25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the two objects described above are reasonably 
believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at 
the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. 
Lastly, officials of the Mississippi Department of Archives and 
History, Historic Preservation Division have determined that, pursuant 
to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity 
that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains 
and associated funerary objects and the Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Pamela D. Edwards, Curator of Archaeological 
Collections, Mississippi

[[Page 35452]]

Department of Archives and History, Historic Preservation Division, 
P.O. Box 571, Jackson, MS 39205, telephone (601) 576-6940, before July 
20, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma may proceed after that date 
if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Historic 
Preservation Division is responsible for notifying the Chickasaw 
Nation, Oklahoma that this notice has been published.

    Dated: May 31, 2005.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 05-12029 Filed 6-17-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S