Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, 31519-31520 [05-10814]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 104 / Wednesday, June 1, 2005 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA National Park Service. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from site 4–SJo–17, San Joaquin County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by California State University, Long Beach professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-wuk Indians of California; California Valley Miwok Tribe, California; Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California; Jackson Rancheria of MeWuk Indians of California; Picayune Rancheria of the Chukchansi Indians of California; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California (also known as the Tachi Yokut Tribe); Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract), California; Table Mountain Rancheria of California; Tule River Indian Tribe of the Tule River Reservation, California; and Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California. In 1967, human remains representing 240 individuals were removed during a salvage excavation project at 4–SJo–17 on private property in San Joaquin County, CA. Faculty and students from what was then Long Beach State College (now California State University, Long Beach) and local volunteers conducted the excavations. No known individuals were identified. The 1,876 associated funerary objects are 398 chipped stone VerDate jul<14>2003 16:22 May 30, 2005 Jkt 205001 tools and fragments, 66 ground or polished stone tools and fragments, 744 fragments of non-human bone, 640 shell beads, and 28 pieces of ceramics or fired clay. Based on burial patterns and artifact types, the human remains and associated funerary objects are dated to the Middle Horizon (2,500–2,000 B.P.). The establishment of a cultural chronology of the 4–SJo–17 collection relied upon the California Prehistoric Cultural Chronology and Artifact Classification System used by most regional archeologists. Multiple lines of evidence were used to determine the antiquity of this collection. Geographic, linguistic, archeological, and ethnographic evidence, as well as oral historical evidence presented at consultation, were used to determine cultural affiliation to the Eastern Miwok and Central Valley Yokuts peoples. The Eastern Miwok and Yokuts cultures of the Late Horizon (from 1,500 years ago to the European contact) are believed to have descended from the Middle Horizon cultures represented at this site, which lies on the border of the traditional territory of the Eastern Miwok and the Northern Valley Yokuts. Officials of California State University, Long Beach, in consultation with the University’s Committee on Native American Burial Remains and Cultural Patrimony, have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent a minimum of 240 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of California State University, Long Beach, in consultation with the Committee on Native American Burial Remains and Cultural Patrimony, also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 1,876 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of California State University, Long Beach, in consultation with the University’s Committee on Native American Burial Remains and Cultural Patrimony, have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-wuk Indians of California; California Valley Miwok Tribe, California; Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California; Jackson Rancheria of MeWuk Indians of California; Picayune Rancheria of the Chukchansi Indians of PO 00000 Frm 00109 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 31519 California; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California (also known as the Tachi Yokut Tribe); Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract), California; Table Mountain Rancheria of California; Tule River Indian Tribe of the Tule River Reservation, California; and Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Keith Ian Polakoff, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, California, 90840–0118; telephone: (562) 985–4128, before July 1, 2005. The Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California (also known as the Tachi Yokut Tribe) has submitted a written claim to the California State University, Long Beach for repatriation of these cultural items. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California (also known as the Tachi Yokut Tribe), may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. California State University, Long Beach is responsible for notifying the Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-wuk Indians of California; California Valley Miwok Tribe, California; Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California; Jackson Rancheria of MeWuk Indians of California; Picayune Rancheria of the Chukchansi Indians of California; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California (also known as Tachi Yokut Tribe, California); Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract), California; Table Mountain Rancheria of California; Tule River Indian Tribe of the Tule River Reservation, California; and Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California that this notice has been published. Dated: May 20, 2005 Paul Hoffman, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Fish and Wildlife and Parks. [FR Doc. 05–10815 Filed 5–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S E:\FR\FM\01JNN1.SGM 01JNN1 31520 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 104 / Wednesday, June 1, 2005 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains were removed from a site along the Fox River in Illinois. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Field Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Huron Potawatomi, Inc., Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas. In 1933, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from a site along the Fox River in Illinois by C.N. Ackerman. In November of the same year, Mr. Ackerman donated the human remains to the Field Museum of Natural History. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains have been identified as Native American based on the specific cultural and geographic attribution in Field Museum of Natural History records. The records identify the human remains as ‘‘female middle age’’ from an ‘‘Old Potowotamie Graveyard, Fox River Ills. Burials in this place prior to 1837.’’ Scholarly publications and consultation information indicate that the Fox River in Illinois is considered to be within the postcontact territory of the Potawatomi Indians. Potowatomi Indian descendants are represented by the present day Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville VerDate jul<14>2003 16:22 May 30, 2005 Jkt 205001 Indian Community, Michigan; Huron Potawatomi, Inc., Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Huron Potawatomi, Inc., Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Helen Robbins, Repatriation Specialist, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605–2496, telephone (312) 665–7317, before July 1, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains to the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Huron Potawatomi, Inc., Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Field Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Huron Potawatomi, Inc., Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas that this notice has been published. PO 00000 Frm 00110 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Dated: May 20, 2005 Paul Hoffman, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Fish and Wildlife and Parks. [FR Doc. 05–10814 Filed 5–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee Findings and Recommendations Regarding a Dispute Between Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: SUMMARY: At a March 13–15, 2005, public meeting in Honolulu, HI, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee (Review Committee) considered a dispute between Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The dispute focused on whether five items in the possession of the park are subject to repatriation under provisions of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. The Review Committee recommended that the park initiate aggressive consultation with all claimants and other interested parties and complete the repatriation process by the end of 2005. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On October 20, 1993, the National Park Service completed a Servicewide summary of collections that may include unassociated funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony. Listed under Hawaii Volcanoes National Park were five items attributed to Forbes Cave, Kawaihae, HI, including one wood statue, one konane board, one bone tool, one gourd vessel, and one bone button. On June 28, 1996, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park completed its inventory of Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The park’s inventory included one cutting tool made of human clavicle with a shark’s tooth said to have been collected from Forbes Cave, Kawaihae, HI. On November 19, 1999, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei filed a claim to repatriate all items removed from Forbes Cave in the possession of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. On November 23, 2004, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei requested the assistance of the Review Committee in resolving its dispute with Hawaii E:\FR\FM\01JNN1.SGM 01JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 104 (Wednesday, June 1, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 31519-31520]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-10814]



[[Page 31520]]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, 
Chicago, IL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains were 
removed from a site along the Fox River in Illinois.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Field Museum 
of Natural History professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest 
County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, 
Michigan; Huron Potawatomi, Inc., Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish 
Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi 
Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, 
Kansas.
    In 1933, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from a site along the Fox River in Illinois by C.N. 
Ackerman. In November of the same year, Mr. Ackerman donated the human 
remains to the Field Museum of Natural History. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The human remains have been identified as Native American based on 
the specific cultural and geographic attribution in Field Museum of 
Natural History records. The records identify the human remains as 
``female middle age'' from an ``Old Potowotamie Graveyard, Fox River 
Ills. Burials in this place prior to 1837.'' Scholarly publications and 
consultation information indicate that the Fox River in Illinois is 
considered to be within the postcontact territory of the Potawatomi 
Indians. Potowatomi Indian descendants are represented by the present 
day Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi 
Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Huron 
Potawatomi, Inc., Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of 
Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, 
Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas.
    Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History 
also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and the Citizen Potawatomi 
Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; 
Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Huron Potawatomi, Inc., 
Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of 
Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and 
Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Helen 
Robbins, Repatriation Specialist, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 
South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496, telephone (312) 665-
7317, before July 1, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains to the 
Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi 
Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Huron 
Potawatomi, Inc., Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of 
Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, 
Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Field Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying 
the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi 
Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Huron 
Potawatomi, Inc., Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of 
Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, 
Michigan and Indiana; and Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: May 20, 2005
Paul Hoffman,
Deputy Assistant Secretary, Fish and Wildlife and Parks.
[FR Doc. 05-10814 Filed 5-31-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S