Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, 31511-31512 [05-10811]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 104 / Wednesday, June 1, 2005 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Big Horn County, MT. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Crow Tribe of Montana. In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed by Dr. W.A. Russell from an unknown site in Big Horn Canyon, Big Horn County, MT. The human remains were found in association with a European feather bed, some old blankets, a feather fan, and part of a beaded shirtsleeve. The human remains, feather fan, and beaded shirtsleeve were acquired by the American Museum of Natural History in 1928. Prior to 1990, the American Museum of Natural History initiated consultation with the Crow Tribe of Montana regarding the return of the human remains and associated funerary objects. The American Museum of Natural History transferred control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Crow Tribe of Montana. A notice of inventory completion was not published at the time since, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3009 (2), the museum’s actions were in response to a repatriation request pending on the date of enactment of NAGPRA. In completing the museum’s NAGPRA inventory, one additional element from the human remains was discovered in storage. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. VerDate jul<14>2003 16:22 May 30, 2005 Jkt 205001 The skeletal morphology and burial practices indicate that the human remains are Native American. The previously returned associated funerary objects date to the post-contact period. The human remains were found within the post-contact territory of the Crow Tribe of Montana. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Crow Tribe of Montana. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Nell Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024–5192, telephone (212) 769–5837, before July 1, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains to the Crow Tribe of Montana may begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Crow Tribe of Montana that this notice has been published. Dated: May 20, 2005. Paul Hoffman, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Fish and Wildlife and Parks. [FR Doc. 05–10803 Filed 5–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from the Pueblo of San Marcos, Santa Fe County, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 PO 00000 Frm 00101 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 31511 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico. In 1915, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals were collected from Pueblo San Marcos, 3– 3.5 miles northeast of Cerrillos, on the northern bank of San Marcos Canyon, in the Galisteo Basin, Santa Fe County, NM, by Nels C. Nelson on behalf of the American Museum of Natural History. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on historic information that suggests that the inhabitants of San Marcos migrated to Cochiti, Laguna, and Santo Domingo Pueblos. San Marcos Pueblo was occupied until 1680. One group of San Marcos villagers, along with Tano from the Galisteo Basin, occupied Santa Fe following the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. In 1706, Vargas resettled villagers from Galisteo Pueblo, San Marcos, and Cienega Pueblo in the previously abandoned Galisteo Pueblo. In 1793 epidemics and hostile attacks forced the survivors of this resettlement to move to Santo Domingo Pueblo. By about 1682 another group that originated from San Marcos joined with the Cochiti and San Felipe peoples at La Cieneguilla, a mesa-top refuge site. Some migrants from San Marcos who took refuge at La Cienguilla migrated to Laguna and others appear to have moved with the Cochiti migrants to present-day Cochiti Pueblo. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of five individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico. E:\FR\FM\01JNN1.SGM 01JNN1 31512 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 104 / Wednesday, June 1, 2005 / Notices Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Nell Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024–5192, telephone (212) 769–5837, before July 1, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains to the Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: May 20, 2005 Paul Hoffman, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Fish and Wildlife and Parks. [FR Doc. 05–10811 Filed 5–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from the Hopi Indian Reservation, Navajo County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. In 1900, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were collected by Dr. Ales Hrdlicka from the base of Second Mesa, Hopi Indian VerDate jul<14>2003 16:22 May 30, 2005 Jkt 205001 Reservation, Navajo County, AZ. Dr. Hrdlicka gifted the human remains to the American Museum of Natural History that same year. The human remains were cataloged as Moki, a dated term for Hopi. The original burial site is located on the Hopi Indian Reservation. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on mode of burial and a catalog label of Moki, a dated term for the Hopi. The provenience of the remains at the base of Second Mesa suggests an association with one of the (primarily) historic towns situated at the top of Second Mesa. Burial within rocks at the mesa margin is consistent with the postcontact Hopi practice of disposing of epidemic victims. Although the lands from which the human remains were collected are currently under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, the American Museum of Natural History has control of the human remains since their removal from tribal land predates the permit requirements established by the Antiquities Act of 1906. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of three individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Nell Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024–5192, telephone (212) 769–5837, before July 1, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona that this notice has been published. Dated: May 20, 2005 Paul Hoffman, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Fish and Wildlife and Parks. [FR Doc. 05–10818 Filed 5–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S PO 00000 Frm 00102 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Montana. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Blackfeet Tribe of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of Montana. According to Museum records, at an unknown date, the naturalist Audubon, upon his return from the Rocky Mountains in Montana, gave human remains representing a minimum of two individuals to Dr. A. V. Williams. Dr. Williams subsequently gifted the remains to the American Museum of Natural History in 1900. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on a catalog description of ‘‘Blackfeet Indians.’’ The geographic origin of the remains is consistent with the post-contact territory of the Blackfeet Nation. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Blackfeet Tribe of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of Montana. E:\FR\FM\01JNN1.SGM 01JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 104 (Wednesday, June 1, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 31511-31512]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-10811]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural 
History, New York, NY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY. The human remains 
were removed from the Pueblo of San Marcos, Santa Fe County, NM.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American 
Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, 
New Mexico; and Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico.
    In 1915, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals 
were collected from Pueblo San Marcos, 3-3.5 miles northeast of 
Cerrillos, on the northern bank of San Marcos Canyon, in the Galisteo 
Basin, Santa Fe County, NM, by Nels C. Nelson on behalf of the American 
Museum of Natural History. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
historic information that suggests that the inhabitants of San Marcos 
migrated to Cochiti, Laguna, and Santo Domingo Pueblos. San Marcos 
Pueblo was occupied until 1680. One group of San Marcos villagers, 
along with Tano from the Galisteo Basin, occupied Santa Fe following 
the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. In 1706, Vargas resettled villagers from 
Galisteo Pueblo, San Marcos, and Cienega Pueblo in the previously 
abandoned Galisteo Pueblo. In 1793 epidemics and hostile attacks forced 
the survivors of this resettlement to move to Santo Domingo Pueblo. By 
about 1682 another group that originated from San Marcos joined with 
the Cochiti and San Felipe peoples at La Cieneguilla, a mesa-top refuge 
site. Some migrants from San Marcos who took refuge at La Cienguilla 
migrated to Laguna and others appear to have moved with the Cochiti 
migrants to present-day Cochiti Pueblo.
    Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of five individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History 
also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and the Pueblo of Cochiti, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Santo Domingo, 
New Mexico.

[[Page 31512]]

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Nell 
Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, American Museum of Natural 
History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192, 
telephone (212) 769-5837, before July 1, 2005. Repatriation of the 
human remains to the Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, 
New Mexico; and Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico may proceed after 
that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying 
the Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; and 
Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: May 20, 2005
Paul Hoffman,
Deputy Assistant Secretary, Fish and Wildlife and Parks.
[FR Doc. 05-10811 Filed 5-31-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S