Pipeline Safety: Meetings of the Pipeline Safety Advisory Committees, 29555-29557 [05-10275]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 98 / Monday, May 23, 2005 / Notices Privacy Act Statement in the April 11, 2000, issue of the Federal Register (65 FR 19477) or go to https://dms.dot.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Florence Hamn at (202) 366–3015 or by e-mail to Florence.Hamn@dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Standards in 49 CFR 192.383, ‘‘Excess flow valve customer notification,’’ require that before operators install or replace certain gas service lines, they must notify customers in writing that excess flow valves are available for installation if the customer agrees to pay for the related expenses. Operators also must keep records that include the notice currently in use and evidence that notices were sent as required during the previous 3 years. The standards were published in response to a statutory mandate in 49 U.S.C. 60110(c). This information collection supports the DOT strategic goal of safety by reducing the number of fatalities, injuries, and amount of property damage. Comments are invited on: (a) The need for the proposed collection of information for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques. As used in this notice, ‘‘information collection’’ includes all work related to preparing and disseminating information related to this recordkeeping requirement including completing paperwork, gathering information and conducting telephone calls. Type of Information Collection Request: Renewal of Existing Collection. Title of Information Collection: Record keeping Requirements for Excess Flow Valves—Customer Notification. OMB Approval Number: 2137–0593. Frequency: A notice is sent before a new service line is installed or an existing service line is replaced. Use: This collection is used by gas customers to decide whether to have EFVs installed and by government inspectors to review operator compliance. Estimated Number of Respondents: 1,540. VerDate jul<14>2003 16:20 May 20, 2005 Jkt 205001 Estimated Annual Burden Hour: 18,000. Issued in Washington DC, on May 17, 2005. Theodore L. Willke, Deputy Associate Administrator for Pipeline Safety. [FR Doc. 05–10203 Filed 5–20–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–60–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration International Standards on the Transport of Dangerous Goods; Public Meetings Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This notice is to advise interested persons that PHMSA will conduct public meetings in preparation for and to report the results of the 27th session of the United Nation’s SubCommittee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods (UNSCOE) to be held July 4–8, 2005 in Geneva, Switzerland. DATES: June 22, 2005, 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m., Room 4438–4440, July 20, 2005, 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m., Room 6200–6204. ADDRESSES: Both meetings will be held at DOT Headquarters, Nassif Building, 400 Seventh Street SW., Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Bob Richard, Director, Office of International Standards, or Mr. Duane Pfund, Senior International Transportation Specialist, Office of Hazardous Materials, Safety, Department of Transportation, Washington, DC 20590; (202) 366–0656. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The primary purpose of the first meeting will be to prepare for the 27th session of the UNSCOE and to discuss draft U.S. positions on UNSCOE proposals. The primary purpose of the second meeting will be to provide a briefing on the outcome of the UNSCOE session and to prepare for the 28th session of the UNSCOE. The 27th session of the UNSCOE is the first meeting in the current biennium cycle. The UNSCOE will consider proposals for the 15th Revised Edition of the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods Model Regulations. Topics to be covered during the public meetings include: (1) Harmonization of PO 00000 Frm 00083 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 29555 the Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods with other model and national regulations, (2) Transport of Dangerous Goods in limited and excepted quantities, (3) Requirements for Intermodal Bulk Containers (IBC), (4) New entries for fuel cell systems containing flammable gas, (5) Requirements related to lithium ion rechargeable batteries, (6) Harmonization with the IAEA Regulations for the safe transport of radioactive materials, (7) Miscellaneous proposals related to listing and classification and the use of packagings and tanks. The public is invited to attend without prior notification. Due to the heightened security measures participants are encouraged to arrive early to allow time for security checks necessary to obtain access to the building. Documents Copies of documents for the UNSCOE meeting and the meeting agenda may be obtained by downloading them from the United Nations Transport Division’s Web site at: https://www.unece.org/trans/ main/dgdb/dgsubc/c32005.htm. This site may also be accessed through PHMSA’s Hazardous Materials Safety Homepage at https://hazmat.dot.gov/ regs/intl/intstandards.htm. PHMSA’s site provides additional information regarding the UNSCOE and related matters such as a summary of decisions taken at previous sessions of the UNSCOE. Robert A. McGuire, Associate Administrator for Hazardous Materials Safety. [FR Doc. 05–10192 Filed 5–20–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–60–M DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. RSPA–98–4470] Pipeline Safety: Meetings of the Pipeline Safety Advisory Committees Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS), Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of meetings. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This notice announces public meetings of Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration’s (PHMSA) Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Committee (TPSSC) and Technical Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Standards Committee (THLPSSC) to discuss various regulatory issues. E:\FR\FM\23MYN1.SGM 23MYN1 29556 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 98 / Monday, May 23, 2005 / Notices The technical pipeline safety advisory committees will meet in joint session on Wednesday, June 15 and Thursday, June 16, 2005, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. ADDRESSES: The meetings will be held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel (Pentagon City), 1250 South Hayes Street, Arlington, VA 22202, www.@ritzcarlton.com. The phone number for reservations at the Ritz Carlton is 1–800–241–3333 or (703) 415–5000. Attendees staying at the hotel must make reservations by Tuesday, May 31. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For additional information regarding these meetings contact: Cheryl Whetsel, OPS, (202) 366–4431; cheryl.whetsel@dot.gov. Background: Reservations by attendees must be received on or before May 31, 2005. Priority is given to the Technical Pipeline Safety Advisory Committee members and State Pipeline Safety Representatives for rooms blocked under the Department of Transportation-Advisory Committee Meeting. Any additional information or changes will be posted on the OPS web page approximately 15 days before the meeting date at https://ops.dot.gov. The public may make short statements on the topics under discussion. Anyone wishing to make an oral statement should notify Cheryl Whetsel, (202) 366–4431, not later than May 31, 2005, on the topic and the length of the presentation. The presiding officer at each meeting may deny any request to present an oral statement and may limit the time of any presentation. You may submit written comments by mail or deliver them to the Dockets Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, Room PL–401, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590–0001. It is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. You also may submit written comments to the docket electronically by logging onto the following Internet Web address: https:// dms.dot.gov. Click on AHelp & Information’’ for instructions on how to file a document electronically. All written comments should reference docket number RSPA–98–4470. Anyone who would like confirmation of mailed comments must include a self-addressed stamped postcard. Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual submitting the comment. You may review DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 70; Pages DATES: VerDate jul<14>2003 16:20 May 20, 2005 Jkt 205001 19477–78) or you may visit https:// dms.dot.gov. Information on Services for Individuals With Disabilities For information on facilities or services for individuals with disabilities or to request special assistance at the meeting, please contact Cheryl Whetsel at (202) 366–4431 by May 31, 2005. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The TPSSC and THLPSSC are statutorily mandated advisory committees that advise the PHMSA, OPS on proposed safety standards for gas and hazardous liquid pipelines. These advisory committees are established under section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92–463, 5 U.S.C. App. 1). The committees consist of 15 members—five each representing government, industry, and the public. The TPSSC and THLPSSC are tasked with determining reasonableness, costeffectiveness, and practicability of regulatory initiatives. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss future challenges facing the pipeline industry and options for direction on key projects. The discussion will focus on three areas: • Managing Risk and Integrity. • Sharing Responsibility and Building Alliances for Safety. • Improving Our Stewardship of the Environment, Security. The OPS will provide an overview on the topics that we will be exploring in each of the subtopics. Under each subtopic, several questions are provided to promote discussion. The agenda follows: Wednesday, June 15 (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.) Managing Risk and Integrity The OPS’s primary responsibility is to use a risk based, performance driven approach to protect the 2.3 million miles of natural gas, petroleum, and other pipelines that crisscross our Nation. These pipelines transport two thirds of the energy supply used by American consumers each year. We carry out this responsibility by identifying safety problems, determining whether standards need to change and how much, enforcing the safety standards, and evaluating whether we are meeting our safety goals. 1. Inspection Technology and Quality Assurance • How do we ensure that technology is applied to get credible results? • Are the national consensus standards sufficient for tool selection and qualification of pig log interpreters? PO 00000 Frm 00084 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 • Is there a need for additional industry standards? • Will these consensus standards solve problems in the future in other subject areas? 2. Pilot Operator Relief Valve Advisory Notice • Is the process outlined in the advisory an appropriate approach to address the inspection of relief valves? 3. Human Factors • What have we learned from the experience of other modes about human factors? • How do human factors affect the performance of pipeline operators? • What evidence do we have that human factors may contribute to incidents? • Is the advice from other modes generally applicable? 4. Distribution Integrity Management Program (DIMP) • Does the current plan draw data from all key areas? • What are your views on including the decision to install and maintain excess flow valves in DIMP? • Should OPS give special consideration to the small operators in DIMP implementation, master meter operators and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) operators? 5. Liquid Gathering Lines • Is the ‘‘integrity’’ approach of protecting pipelines that could affect unusually sensitive areas (USA’s) appropriate? • What safety functions are appropriate or needed? Thursday, June 16 (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.) Sharing Responsibility and Building Alliances for Safety The OPS seeks out partnerships with all of our stakeholders. Each provides unique experiences and information to augment our efforts to keep the people and the environment safe. One example of a successful partnership, between the OPS and the National Association of Fire Marshals, is the production of a video, Pipeline Emergencies, that will provide emergency personnel, state and local officials and others an overview of the pipeline system. There are many safety roles to play and some have yet to be identified. 1. Common Ground Alliance (CGA)— Virginia Experience • Do you believe enforcement will be necessary for damage prevention? E:\FR\FM\23MYN1.SGM 23MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 98 / Monday, May 23, 2005 / Notices • How do we improve effectiveness of the one-call system and what is the role of technology? • How can we apply the Virginia experience in other areas (i.e., distribution integrity management)? 2. High Consequence Area (CCA) Pilots • Is there a way of using partnerships to expand damage prevention, emergency preparedness and response? • Are there key partners missing? If so, how do we enlist them, such as in the areas of emergency preparedness, encroachment, etc.? • Should this best practice model be introduced to all States? 3. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) • Is PHMSA/OPS doing all it should to educate communities about LNG? Show Video Clip—Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Information Planning Alliance (PIPPA) • How do we approach home builders and insurers? Improving Our Stewardship in Environmental and Energy Projects The OPS is the Federal pipeline safety expert and recognizes how important it is to share its expertise with other government and State agencies responsible for supporting our government’s national energy policies. OPS also provides information and assists other government and State agencies responsible for protecting our Nation’s pipeline system. 1. Permit Streamlining • How do we introduce our concepts to State and local agencies? • What is the most efficient way to develop best practices? • How could we effectively use and improve on developing best practices during implementation of the second pilot program? 2. Alaska • Are OPS’s current pipeline safety regulations aligned and applicable for the new technologies and materials being proposed for the Alaska North Slope gas transmission pipeline? • What changes need to be made to ensure the optimum delivery rate from Alaska, through Canada, and into the lower 48 States? 3. Security • How can OPS ensure continuing pipeline security in the current environment? • What is OPS doing for pipeline security? VerDate jul<14>2003 16:20 May 20, 2005 Jkt 205001 Authority: 49 U.S.C. 60102, 60115. Issued in Washington, DC on May 18, 2005. Theodore L. Willke, Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Pipeline Safety. [FR Doc. 05–10275 Filed 5–19–05; 10:32 am] BILLING CODE 4910–60–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Planning for Coordination of Emergency Response to Pipeline Emergencies Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS), Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice; issuance of advisory bulletin. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This document alerts pipeline operators about the need to preplan for emergency response with utilities whose proximity to the pipeline may impact the response. Coordination with electric and other utilities may be critical in responding to a pipeline emergency. Preplanning would facilitate actions that may be needed for safety, such as removing sources of ignition or reducing the amount of combustible material. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert J. Hall by phone at (202) 3668860, by fax at (202) 366-4566, or by email, robert.hall@dot.gov. General information about the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration’s Office of Pipeline Safety programs may be obtained by accessing the home page at https:// ops.dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Existing regulations for both gas and hazardous liquid pipelines require operators to have emergency procedures to address pipeline emergencies. The key element of these requirements, which are located at 49 CFR 192.615 and 195.402(e), is to plan response before the emergency occurs. Because pipelines are often located in public space rather than in controlled access areas, planning emergency response must include more than internal plans. The regulations explicitly require that operators include procedures for planning with fire, police and other public officials to ensure a coordinated response. It is also important to plan a coordinated response with owners of other utilities in the vicinity of the PO 00000 Frm 00085 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 29557 pipeline. The operations of these utilities may provide sources of ignition for the product released from a pipeline, may increase the burning time of fires that have already started, or may delay responders who are attempting to make the situation safe rapidly. In the evening of April 7, 2003, a breakout tank exploded and subsequently ignited in Glenpool, Oklahoma. The fire continued to burn and increased in the early morning of April 8 when electric lines affected by the previous day’s explosion and fire fell into a dike. The diesel fuel being contained in the dike ignited, expanding the fire. This resulted in a temporary suspension of firefighting and damaged additional facilities. While there were no injuries or fatalities, the fire burned for over 20 hours; the cost of the accident exceeded two million dollars; residents were evacuated; and schools were closed. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) conducted an investigation of the accident. In its report, the NTSB found that lack of a coordinated emergency response contributed to the severity of the accident. The NTSB noted that the existing pipeline safety regulations on emergency procedures do not explicitly require that operators have procedures for preplanning with electric and other utilities. A previous accident also points to the need for better coordination of emergency response. On March 1, 1998, a pipeline failure occurred when a raven landed on a power line. This resulted in a fault current that impacted a gas pipeline in Anchorage, Alaska. The situation very quickly developed into an explosion at the public electric company’s plant. Although preplanning was required by regulation, the pipeline operator did not coordinate emergency response well with the fire department resulting in delays in shutting off the flow of gas. This resulted in additional fire damage. Inadequate coordination with the electric company also contributed to this delay. These accidents point to the need for operators to plan with utilities on how to coordinate actions needed in responding to a pipeline emergency. This preplanning will result in better coordination when an emergency occurs. II. Advisory Bulletin ADB–05–03 To: Owners and Operators of Natural Gas and Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Facilities in the Vicinity of Electric and other Utilities. Subject: Preplanning with owners of electric and other utilities for E:\FR\FM\23MYN1.SGM 23MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 98 (Monday, May 23, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 29555-29557]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-10275]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

[Docket No. RSPA-98-4470]


Pipeline Safety: Meetings of the Pipeline Safety Advisory 
Committees

AGENCY: Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS), Pipeline and Hazardous 
Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), Department of Transportation 
(DOT).

ACTION: Notice of meetings.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This notice announces public meetings of Pipeline and 
Hazardous Materials Safety Administration's (PHMSA) Technical Pipeline 
Safety Standards Committee (TPSSC) and Technical Hazardous Liquid 
Pipeline Safety Standards Committee (THLPSSC) to discuss various 
regulatory issues.

[[Page 29556]]


DATES: The technical pipeline safety advisory committees will meet in 
joint session on Wednesday, June 15 and Thursday, June 16, 2005, from 8 
a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.

ADDRESSES: The meetings will be held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel 
(Pentagon City), 1250 South Hayes Street, Arlington, VA 22202, 
www.@ritzcarlton.com. The phone number for reservations at the Ritz 
Carlton is 1-800-241-3333 or (703) 415-5000. Attendees staying at the 
hotel must make reservations by Tuesday, May 31.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For additional information regarding 
these meetings contact: Cheryl Whetsel, OPS, (202) 366-4431; 
cheryl.whetsel@dot.gov.
    Background: Reservations by attendees must be received on or before 
May 31, 2005. Priority is given to the Technical Pipeline Safety 
Advisory Committee members and State Pipeline Safety Representatives 
for rooms blocked under the Department of Transportation-Advisory 
Committee Meeting. Any additional information or changes will be posted 
on the OPS web page approximately 15 days before the meeting date at 
https://ops.dot.gov.
    The public may make short statements on the topics under 
discussion. Anyone wishing to make an oral statement should notify 
Cheryl Whetsel, (202) 366-4431, not later than May 31, 2005, on the 
topic and the length of the presentation. The presiding officer at each 
meeting may deny any request to present an oral statement and may limit 
the time of any presentation.
    You may submit written comments by mail or deliver them to the 
Dockets Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, Room PL-401, 400 
Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590-0001. It is open from 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. You also may 
submit written comments to the docket electronically by logging onto 
the following Internet Web address: https://dms.dot.gov. Click on AHelp 
& Information'' for instructions on how to file a document 
electronically. All written comments should reference docket number 
RSPA-98-4470. Anyone who would like confirmation of mailed comments 
must include a self-addressed stamped postcard.
    Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments 
received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual 
submitting the comment. You may review DOT's complete Privacy Act 
Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (Volume 
65, Number 70; Pages 19477-78) or you may visit https://dms.dot.gov.

Information on Services for Individuals With Disabilities

    For information on facilities or services for individuals with 
disabilities or to request special assistance at the meeting, please 
contact Cheryl Whetsel at (202) 366-4431 by May 31, 2005.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The TPSSC and THLPSSC are statutorily 
mandated advisory committees that advise the PHMSA, OPS on proposed 
safety standards for gas and hazardous liquid pipelines. These advisory 
committees are established under section 10(a)(2) of the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 5 U.S.C. App. 1). The 
committees consist of 15 members--five each representing government, 
industry, and the public. The TPSSC and THLPSSC are tasked with 
determining reasonableness, cost-effectiveness, and practicability of 
regulatory initiatives.
    The purpose of the meeting is to discuss future challenges facing 
the pipeline industry and options for direction on key projects. The 
discussion will focus on three areas:
     Managing Risk and Integrity.
     Sharing Responsibility and Building Alliances for Safety.
     Improving Our Stewardship of the Environment, Security.
    The OPS will provide an overview on the topics that we will be 
exploring in each of the subtopics. Under each subtopic, several 
questions are provided to promote discussion. The agenda follows:

Wednesday, June 15 (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.)

Managing Risk and Integrity

    The OPS's primary responsibility is to use a risk based, 
performance driven approach to protect the 2.3 million miles of natural 
gas, petroleum, and other pipelines that crisscross our Nation.
    These pipelines transport two thirds of the energy supply used by 
American consumers each year. We carry out this responsibility by 
identifying safety problems, determining whether standards need to 
change and how much, enforcing the safety standards, and evaluating 
whether we are meeting our safety goals.
1. Inspection Technology and Quality Assurance
     How do we ensure that technology is applied to get 
credible results?
     Are the national consensus standards sufficient for tool 
selection and qualification of pig log interpreters?
     Is there a need for additional industry standards?
     Will these consensus standards solve problems in the 
future in other subject areas?
2. Pilot Operator Relief Valve Advisory Notice
     Is the process outlined in the advisory an appropriate 
approach to address the inspection of relief valves?
3. Human Factors
     What have we learned from the experience of other modes 
about human factors?
     How do human factors affect the performance of pipeline 
operators?
     What evidence do we have that human factors may contribute 
to incidents?
     Is the advice from other modes generally applicable?
4. Distribution Integrity Management Program (DIMP)
     Does the current plan draw data from all key areas?
     What are your views on including the decision to install 
and maintain excess flow valves in DIMP?
     Should OPS give special consideration to the small 
operators in DIMP implementation, master meter operators and liquefied 
petroleum gas (LPG) operators?
5. Liquid Gathering Lines
     Is the ``integrity'' approach of protecting pipelines that 
could affect unusually sensitive areas (USA's) appropriate?
     What safety functions are appropriate or needed?

Thursday, June 16 (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.)

Sharing Responsibility and Building Alliances for Safety

    The OPS seeks out partnerships with all of our stakeholders. Each 
provides unique experiences and information to augment our efforts to 
keep the people and the environment safe. One example of a successful 
partnership, between the OPS and the National Association of Fire 
Marshals, is the production of a video, Pipeline Emergencies, that will 
provide emergency personnel, state and local officials and others an 
overview of the pipeline system. There are many safety roles to play 
and some have yet to be identified.
1. Common Ground Alliance (CGA)--Virginia Experience
     Do you believe enforcement will be necessary for damage 
prevention?

[[Page 29557]]

     How do we improve effectiveness of the one-call system and 
what is the role of technology?
     How can we apply the Virginia experience in other areas 
(i.e., distribution integrity management)?
2. High Consequence Area (CCA) Pilots
     Is there a way of using partnerships to expand damage 
prevention, emergency preparedness and response?
     Are there key partners missing? If so, how do we enlist 
them, such as in the areas of emergency preparedness, encroachment, 
etc.?
     Should this best practice model be introduced to all 
States?
3. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)
     Is PHMSA/OPS doing all it should to educate communities 
about LNG?
    Show Video Clip--Liquefied Natural Gas

Pipeline Information Planning Alliance (PIPPA)

     How do we approach home builders and insurers?

Improving Our Stewardship in Environmental and Energy Projects

    The OPS is the Federal pipeline safety expert and recognizes how 
important it is to share its expertise with other government and State 
agencies responsible for supporting our government's national energy 
policies. OPS also provides information and assists other government 
and State agencies responsible for protecting our Nation's pipeline 
system.
1. Permit Streamlining
     How do we introduce our concepts to State and local 
agencies?
     What is the most efficient way to develop best practices?
     How could we effectively use and improve on developing 
best practices during implementation of the second pilot program?
2. Alaska
     Are OPS's current pipeline safety regulations aligned and 
applicable for the new technologies and materials being proposed for 
the Alaska North Slope gas transmission pipeline?
     What changes need to be made to ensure the optimum 
delivery rate from Alaska, through Canada, and into the lower 48 
States?
3. Security
     How can OPS ensure continuing pipeline security in the 
current environment?
     What is OPS doing for pipeline security?

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 60102, 60115.

    Issued in Washington, DC on May 18, 2005.
Theodore L. Willke,
Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Pipeline Safety.
[FR Doc. 05-10275 Filed 5-19-05; 10:32 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-60-P