Pipeline Safety: Planning for Coordination of Emergency Response to Pipeline Emergencies, 29557-29558 [05-10202]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 98 / Monday, May 23, 2005 / Notices • How do we improve effectiveness of the one-call system and what is the role of technology? • How can we apply the Virginia experience in other areas (i.e., distribution integrity management)? 2. High Consequence Area (CCA) Pilots • Is there a way of using partnerships to expand damage prevention, emergency preparedness and response? • Are there key partners missing? If so, how do we enlist them, such as in the areas of emergency preparedness, encroachment, etc.? • Should this best practice model be introduced to all States? 3. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) • Is PHMSA/OPS doing all it should to educate communities about LNG? Show Video Clip—Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Information Planning Alliance (PIPPA) • How do we approach home builders and insurers? Improving Our Stewardship in Environmental and Energy Projects The OPS is the Federal pipeline safety expert and recognizes how important it is to share its expertise with other government and State agencies responsible for supporting our government’s national energy policies. OPS also provides information and assists other government and State agencies responsible for protecting our Nation’s pipeline system. 1. Permit Streamlining • How do we introduce our concepts to State and local agencies? • What is the most efficient way to develop best practices? • How could we effectively use and improve on developing best practices during implementation of the second pilot program? 2. Alaska • Are OPS’s current pipeline safety regulations aligned and applicable for the new technologies and materials being proposed for the Alaska North Slope gas transmission pipeline? • What changes need to be made to ensure the optimum delivery rate from Alaska, through Canada, and into the lower 48 States? 3. Security • How can OPS ensure continuing pipeline security in the current environment? • What is OPS doing for pipeline security? VerDate jul<14>2003 16:20 May 20, 2005 Jkt 205001 Authority: 49 U.S.C. 60102, 60115. Issued in Washington, DC on May 18, 2005. Theodore L. Willke, Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Pipeline Safety. [FR Doc. 05–10275 Filed 5–19–05; 10:32 am] BILLING CODE 4910–60–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Planning for Coordination of Emergency Response to Pipeline Emergencies Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS), Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice; issuance of advisory bulletin. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This document alerts pipeline operators about the need to preplan for emergency response with utilities whose proximity to the pipeline may impact the response. Coordination with electric and other utilities may be critical in responding to a pipeline emergency. Preplanning would facilitate actions that may be needed for safety, such as removing sources of ignition or reducing the amount of combustible material. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert J. Hall by phone at (202) 3668860, by fax at (202) 366-4566, or by email, robert.hall@dot.gov. General information about the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration’s Office of Pipeline Safety programs may be obtained by accessing the home page at https:// ops.dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Existing regulations for both gas and hazardous liquid pipelines require operators to have emergency procedures to address pipeline emergencies. The key element of these requirements, which are located at 49 CFR 192.615 and 195.402(e), is to plan response before the emergency occurs. Because pipelines are often located in public space rather than in controlled access areas, planning emergency response must include more than internal plans. The regulations explicitly require that operators include procedures for planning with fire, police and other public officials to ensure a coordinated response. It is also important to plan a coordinated response with owners of other utilities in the vicinity of the PO 00000 Frm 00085 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 29557 pipeline. The operations of these utilities may provide sources of ignition for the product released from a pipeline, may increase the burning time of fires that have already started, or may delay responders who are attempting to make the situation safe rapidly. In the evening of April 7, 2003, a breakout tank exploded and subsequently ignited in Glenpool, Oklahoma. The fire continued to burn and increased in the early morning of April 8 when electric lines affected by the previous day’s explosion and fire fell into a dike. The diesel fuel being contained in the dike ignited, expanding the fire. This resulted in a temporary suspension of firefighting and damaged additional facilities. While there were no injuries or fatalities, the fire burned for over 20 hours; the cost of the accident exceeded two million dollars; residents were evacuated; and schools were closed. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) conducted an investigation of the accident. In its report, the NTSB found that lack of a coordinated emergency response contributed to the severity of the accident. The NTSB noted that the existing pipeline safety regulations on emergency procedures do not explicitly require that operators have procedures for preplanning with electric and other utilities. A previous accident also points to the need for better coordination of emergency response. On March 1, 1998, a pipeline failure occurred when a raven landed on a power line. This resulted in a fault current that impacted a gas pipeline in Anchorage, Alaska. The situation very quickly developed into an explosion at the public electric company’s plant. Although preplanning was required by regulation, the pipeline operator did not coordinate emergency response well with the fire department resulting in delays in shutting off the flow of gas. This resulted in additional fire damage. Inadequate coordination with the electric company also contributed to this delay. These accidents point to the need for operators to plan with utilities on how to coordinate actions needed in responding to a pipeline emergency. This preplanning will result in better coordination when an emergency occurs. II. Advisory Bulletin ADB–05–03 To: Owners and Operators of Natural Gas and Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Facilities in the Vicinity of Electric and other Utilities. Subject: Preplanning with owners of electric and other utilities for E:\FR\FM\23MYN1.SGM 23MYN1 29558 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 98 / Monday, May 23, 2005 / Notices coordinated response to pipeline emergencies. Purpose: To advise operators of pipeline facilities located near electric and other utilities of the need to preplan emergency response with the owners of those electric and other utilities to ensure better coordination of response, and reduced damages, when a pipeline emergency occurs. Advisory: Operators of pipeline facilities are required to plan emergency response before an emergency happens. The regulations include required elements of emergency plans and procedures. In planning emergency VerDate jul<14>2003 16:20 May 20, 2005 Jkt 205001 response, an operator should carefully look at the environment surrounding the pipeline facility and the risks that the environment will pose in the event of a pipeline emergency. Electric and other utilities may pose sources of ignition or may provide additional fuel for fires. The operations of these utilities may make response to a pipeline emergency by firefighters or the pipeline operator more difficult. Preplanning with these utilities will help the operator identify issues that may arise in responding to pipeline emergencies and plan effective response before there is an emergency. PO 00000 Frm 00086 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 This will improve the coordination of emergency response and reduce delays. OPS advises pipeline operators to include within their emergency response planning outreach to owners of electric and other utilities in order to preplan and coordinate response to pipeline emergencies. Issued in Washington, DC, on May 17, 2005. Theodore L. Willke, Deputy Associate Administrator for Pipeline Safety. [FR Doc. 05–10202 Filed 5–20–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–60–P E:\FR\FM\23MYN1.SGM 23MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 98 (Monday, May 23, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 29557-29558]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-10202]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration


Pipeline Safety: Planning for Coordination of Emergency Response 
to Pipeline Emergencies

AGENCY: Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS), Pipeline and Hazardous 
Materials Safety Administration, DOT.

ACTION: Notice; issuance of advisory bulletin.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This document alerts pipeline operators about the need to 
preplan for emergency response with utilities whose proximity to the 
pipeline may impact the response. Coordination with electric and other 
utilities may be critical in responding to a pipeline emergency. 
Preplanning would facilitate actions that may be needed for safety, 
such as removing sources of ignition or reducing the amount of 
combustible material.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert J. Hall by phone at (202) 366-
8860, by fax at (202) 366-4566, or by e-mail, robert.hall@dot.gov. 
General information about the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration's Office of Pipeline Safety programs may be obtained by 
accessing the home page at https://ops.dot.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

    Existing regulations for both gas and hazardous liquid pipelines 
require operators to have emergency procedures to address pipeline 
emergencies. The key element of these requirements, which are located 
at 49 CFR 192.615 and 195.402(e), is to plan response before the 
emergency occurs. Because pipelines are often located in public space 
rather than in controlled access areas, planning emergency response 
must include more than internal plans. The regulations explicitly 
require that operators include procedures for planning with fire, 
police and other public officials to ensure a coordinated response. It 
is also important to plan a coordinated response with owners of other 
utilities in the vicinity of the pipeline. The operations of these 
utilities may provide sources of ignition for the product released from 
a pipeline, may increase the burning time of fires that have already 
started, or may delay responders who are attempting to make the 
situation safe rapidly.
    In the evening of April 7, 2003, a breakout tank exploded and 
subsequently ignited in Glenpool, Oklahoma. The fire continued to burn 
and increased in the early morning of April 8 when electric lines 
affected by the previous day's explosion and fire fell into a dike. The 
diesel fuel being contained in the dike ignited, expanding the fire. 
This resulted in a temporary suspension of firefighting and damaged 
additional facilities. While there were no injuries or fatalities, the 
fire burned for over 20 hours; the cost of the accident exceeded two 
million dollars; residents were evacuated; and schools were closed. The 
National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) conducted an investigation 
of the accident. In its report, the NTSB found that lack of a 
coordinated emergency response contributed to the severity of the 
accident. The NTSB noted that the existing pipeline safety regulations 
on emergency procedures do not explicitly require that operators have 
procedures for preplanning with electric and other utilities.
    A previous accident also points to the need for better coordination 
of emergency response. On March 1, 1998, a pipeline failure occurred 
when a raven landed on a power line. This resulted in a fault current 
that impacted a gas pipeline in Anchorage, Alaska. The situation very 
quickly developed into an explosion at the public electric company's 
plant. Although preplanning was required by regulation, the pipeline 
operator did not coordinate emergency response well with the fire 
department resulting in delays in shutting off the flow of gas. This 
resulted in additional fire damage. Inadequate coordination with the 
electric company also contributed to this delay.
    These accidents point to the need for operators to plan with 
utilities on how to coordinate actions needed in responding to a 
pipeline emergency. This preplanning will result in better coordination 
when an emergency occurs.

II. Advisory Bulletin ADB-05-03

    To: Owners and Operators of Natural Gas and Hazardous Liquid 
Pipeline Facilities in the Vicinity of Electric and other Utilities.
    Subject: Preplanning with owners of electric and other utilities 
for

[[Page 29558]]

coordinated response to pipeline emergencies.
    Purpose: To advise operators of pipeline facilities located near 
electric and other utilities of the need to preplan emergency response 
with the owners of those electric and other utilities to ensure better 
coordination of response, and reduced damages, when a pipeline 
emergency occurs.
    Advisory: Operators of pipeline facilities are required to plan 
emergency response before an emergency happens. The regulations include 
required elements of emergency plans and procedures. In planning 
emergency response, an operator should carefully look at the 
environment surrounding the pipeline facility and the risks that the 
environment will pose in the event of a pipeline emergency. Electric 
and other utilities may pose sources of ignition or may provide 
additional fuel for fires. The operations of these utilities may make 
response to a pipeline emergency by firefighters or the pipeline 
operator more difficult. Preplanning with these utilities will help the 
operator identify issues that may arise in responding to pipeline 
emergencies and plan effective response before there is an emergency. 
This will improve the coordination of emergency response and reduce 
delays.
    OPS advises pipeline operators to include within their emergency 
response planning outreach to owners of electric and other utilities in 
order to preplan and coordinate response to pipeline emergencies.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on May 17, 2005.
Theodore L. Willke,
Deputy Associate Administrator for Pipeline Safety.
[FR Doc. 05-10202 Filed 5-20-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-60-P