Notice of Inventory Completion: The University Museum, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 16842-16843 [05-6465]

Download as PDF 16842 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 62 / Friday, April 1, 2005 / Notices Caddo Nation of Oklahoma and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco and Tawakonie), Oklahoma. In 1913, a Hudson Engraved ceramic vessel was collected from a site whose locality is described as ‘‘Sec 7 TP6S, R23E’’ in McCurtain County, OK, by E.S. Byington. Mr Byington was temporarily employed by W.K. Moorehead of the Robert S. Peabody Museum. Museum records indicate that human remains and the ceramic vessel were collected by Mr. Byington for the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology, although the excavator is identified as T.H. Rogers. Both men were employees of the Texas, Oklahoma and Eastern Railroad Company. In 1963, the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology donated the human remains to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University. The human remains associated with the funerary object are in the custody of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University and were described in a notice of inventory completion published in the Federal Register on August 16, 2000 (FR Doc. 00-20823). Based on geographical, historic, and archeological evidence, the associated funerary object is culturally affiliated with the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma. Hudson Engraved ceramics are related to the McCurtain phase (A.D.1450-1600), and historic evidence indicates that Hudson Engraved ceramics were produced by Caddoan peoples circa A.D. 1500-1730. Although the exact site from which the human remains and the associated funerary object were removed is not known, the site is located in the historic territory of the Caddo tribe; other sites in the area have produced Hudson Engraved or closely related vessels, some of which have been found in association with European trade items. Officials of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the one object described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Officials of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American associated funerary object and the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the associated funerary VerDate jul<14>2003 17:15 Mar 31, 2005 Jkt 205001 object should contact Malinda Blustain, Director, Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA 01810, telephone (978) 749-4490, before May 2, 2005. Repatriation of the associated funerary object to the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology is responsible for notifying the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco and Tawakonie), Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: February 2, 2005. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–6467 Filed 3–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The University Museum, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of The University Museum, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR. The human remains were removed from sites in Conway, Pulaski, and Yell Counties, AR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University of Arkansas professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Osage Tribe, Oklahoma; Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed during a museum-sponsored excavation at the Keo site in Pulaski County, AR. The human remains became part of the PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 University of Arkansas collection by 1964. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed during museum-sponsored excavations from the Point Remove site (3CN4), located south of Morrilton, Conway County, AR. The human remains became part of the University of Arkansas collection in 1931 and 1966. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Point Remove site indicate that the human remains were probably buried during the Mississippian period (A.D. 900-1541). On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from an unspecified site in Conway County, AR. The human remains became part of the University of Arkansas collection in 1929. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a ceramic water bottle with incised decoration. The associated funerary object indicates that the human remains were probably buried during the Mississippian period (A.D. 900-1541). On an unknown date, human remains representing six individuals were removed during a museum-sponsored excavation at the Carden Bottoms site (3YE14) in Yell County, AR. The human remains became part of the University of Arkansas collection in 1927 and 1931. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Carden Bottoms site (3YE14) indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Mississippian period (A.D. 900-1541). On an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were removed during a museum-sponsored excavation at the Delaware Creek site (3YE6) in Yell County, AR. The human remains became part of the University of Arkansas collection in 1967. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Delaware Creek site indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the Mississippian period (A.D. 900-1541). On an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were removed from an unspecified site in Yell County, AR. The human remains became part of the University of Arkansas collection in 1928. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. E:\FR\FM\01APN1.SGM 01APN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 62 / Friday, April 1, 2005 / Notices Physical examination of the human remains reveals skeletal and dental morphological traits common in Native American populations. The human remains and associated funerary object are believed to be associated with the Carden Bottoms complex, a Mississippian period archeological manifestation common along the Lower Arkansas River, including the area of Conway, Pulaski, and Yell Counties, Arkansas. The identity of the Carden Bottoms complex descendents is controversial. In 1542 and 1673, European travelers recorded the names of towns along the lower Arkansas River that appear to be derived from the Tunica language. Carden Bottoms complex ceramic traditions are similar to ceramic wares recovered from known 18th-century Tunica sites. Quapaw oral traditions describe their late arrival and expulsion of the Tunica from the lower Arkansas River area. The Quapaw tribe dominated that area when sustained European occupation of the lower Arkansas River began around 1700. The Osage tribe seasonally hunted the Ozark Highlands north of the Arkansas River Valley in the 18th century and traveled along the Arkansas River. In 1808. the Osage ceded the area north of the Arkansas River, including the area of Conway County, to the United States. In 1818, the Quapaw ceded the area south of the Arkansas River, including the area of Pulaski and Yell Counties, to the United States. Officials of the University of Arkansas have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 12 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the University of Arkansas also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the one object described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the University of Arkansas have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary object and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma and the Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Mary Suter, Curator of Collections, The University Museum, University of Arkansas, Biomass Research Center, Fayetteville, AR 72701, telephone (479) 575-3456, before May 2, VerDate jul<14>2003 17:15 Mar 31, 2005 Jkt 205001 2005. Repatriation of the human remains to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma and the Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The University of Arkansas is responsible for notifying the Osage Tribe, Oklahoma; Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana that this notice has been published. Dated: February 4, 2005. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–6465 Filed 3–31–05; 8:45 am] 16843 Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on February 2, 2005 (70 FR 5481). Dorothy B. Fountain, Deputy Director of Operations, Antitrust Division. [FR Doc. 05–6494 Filed 3–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–11–M DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to The National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993—Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993—AAF Association, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on March 10, 2005, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (‘‘the Act’’), AAF Association, Inc. has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the Federal Trade Commission disclosing changes in its membership. The notifications were filed for the purpose of extending the Act’s provisions limiting the recovery of antitrust plaintiffs to actual damages under specified circumstances. Specifically, Profound Effects, Middleton, WI; and Curious Rabbit Software, Livermore, CA have withdrawn as parties to this venture. No other changes have been made in either the membership or planned activity of the group research project. Membership in this group research project remains open, and AAF Association, Inc. intends to file additional written notification disclosing all changes in membership. On March 28, 2000, AAF Association, Inc. filed its original notification pursuant to Section 6(a) of the Act. The Department of Justice published a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to section 6(b) of the Act on June 29, 2000 (65 FR 40127). The last notification was filed with the Department on December 22, 2004. A notice was published in the Federal PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Notice is hereby given that, on March 8, 2005, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (‘‘the Act’’), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (‘‘IEEE’’) has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the Federal Trade Commission disclosing additions or changes to its standards development activities. The notifications were filed for the purpose of extending the Act’s provisions limiting the recovery of antitrust plaintiffs to actual damages under specified circumstances. Specifically, four new standards have been initiated and six existing standards are being revised. More detail regarding these changes can be found at http:// standards.ieee.org/bearer/sba/03–04– 05.html. On September 17, 2004, IEEE filed its original notification pursuant to Section 6(a) of the Act. The Department of Justice published as notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on November 3, 2004 (69 FR 64105). The last notification was filed with the Department on January 14, 2005. A notice was published in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on February 11, 2005 (70 FR 7307). Dorothy B. Fountain, Deputy Director of Operations, Antitrust Division. [FR Doc. 05–6492 Filed 3–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–11–M E:\FR\FM\01APN1.SGM 01APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 62 (Friday, April 1, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 16842-16843]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-6465]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: The University Museum, University 
of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of The University Museum, University of 
Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR. The human remains were removed from sites 
in Conway, Pulaski, and Yell Counties, AR.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University 
of Arkansas professional staff in consultation with representatives of 
the Osage Tribe, Oklahoma; Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and 
Tunica[macr]Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed during a museum[macr]sponsored excavation at 
the Keo site in Pulaski County, AR. The human remains became part of 
the University of Arkansas collection by 1964. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two 
individuals were removed during museum[macr]sponsored excavations from 
the Point Remove site (3CN4), located south of Morrilton, Conway 
County, AR. The human remains became part of the University of Arkansas 
collection in 1931 and 1966. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present. Diagnostic artifacts found at 
the Point Remove site indicate that the human remains were probably 
buried during the Mississippian period (A.D. 900[macr]1541).
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from an unspecified site in Conway County, AR. 
The human remains became part of the University of Arkansas collection 
in 1929. No known individual was identified. The one associated 
funerary object is a ceramic water bottle with incised decoration. The 
associated funerary object indicates that the human remains were 
probably buried during the Mississippian period (A.D. 900[macr]1541).
    On an unknown date, human remains representing six individuals were 
removed during a museum[macr]sponsored excavation at the Carden Bottoms 
site (3YE14) in Yell County, AR. The human remains became part of the 
University of Arkansas collection in 1927 and 1931. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present. Diagnostic artifacts found at the Carden Bottoms site (3YE14) 
indicate that these human remains were probably buried during the 
Mississippian period (A.D. 900[macr]1541).
    On an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were 
removed during a museum[macr]sponsored excavation at the Delaware Creek 
site (3YE6) in Yell County, AR. The human remains became part of the 
University of Arkansas collection in 1967. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Diagnostic 
artifacts found at the Delaware Creek site indicate that these human 
remains were probably buried during the Mississippian period (A.D. 
900[macr]1541).
    On an unknown date, human remains representing one individual were 
removed from an unspecified site in Yell County, AR. The human remains 
became part of the University of Arkansas collection in 1928. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.

[[Page 16843]]

    Physical examination of the human remains reveals skeletal and 
dental morphological traits common in Native American populations. The 
human remains and associated funerary object are believed to be 
associated with the Carden Bottoms complex, a Mississippian period 
archeological manifestation common along the Lower Arkansas River, 
including the area of Conway, Pulaski, and Yell Counties, Arkansas. The 
identity of the Carden Bottoms complex descendents is controversial. In 
1542 and 1673, European travelers recorded the names of towns along the 
lower Arkansas River that appear to be derived from the Tunica 
language. Carden Bottoms complex ceramic traditions are similar to 
ceramic wares recovered from known 18th[macr]century Tunica sites. 
Quapaw oral traditions describe their late arrival and expulsion of the 
Tunica from the lower Arkansas River area. The Quapaw tribe dominated 
that area when sustained European occupation of the lower Arkansas 
River began around 1700. The Osage tribe seasonally hunted the Ozark 
Highlands north of the Arkansas River Valley in the 18th century and 
traveled along the Arkansas River. In 1808. the Osage ceded the area 
north of the Arkansas River, including the area of Conway County, to 
the United States. In 1818, the Quapaw ceded the area south of the 
Arkansas River, including the area of Pulaski and Yell Counties, to the 
United States.
    Officials of the University of Arkansas have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9[macr]10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of 12 individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the University of Arkansas also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the one object 
described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite 
or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the University of Arkansas have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
object and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma and the 
Tunica[macr]Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Mary 
Suter, Curator of Collections, The University Museum, University of 
Arkansas, Biomass Research Center, Fayetteville, AR 72701, telephone 
(479) 575[macr]3456, before May 2, 2005. Repatriation of the human 
remains to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma and the 
Tunica[macr]Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana may proceed after that 
date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The University of Arkansas is responsible for notifying the Osage 
Tribe, Oklahoma; Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and 
Tunica[macr]Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: February 4, 2005.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 05-6465 Filed 3-31-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S