Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, 16837-16838 [05-6464]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 62 / Friday, April 1, 2005 / Notices Fraser, Office of Policy, National Park Service; 1849 C Street, NW., Room 7250; Washington, DC 20240; telephone 202– 208–7456. Draft minutes of the meeting will be available for public inspection about 12 weeks after the meeting, in room 7252, Main Interior Building, 1849 C Street, NW., Washington, DC. Dated: March 18, 2005. Loran Fraser, Chief, Office of Policy. [FR Doc. 05–6516 Filed 3–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY. The human remains were collected from the Mescalero Indian Reservation, Otero County, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico. In 1900, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected from the Mescalero Indian Reservation, Otero County, NM, by Dr. McLutterell, identified in the Museum’s catalog as ‘‘the agent.’’ The American Museum of Natural History obtained the remains as a gift from Dr. Ales Hrdlicka. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. This individual has been identified as Native American based on the Museum’s catalog identification of the remains as Mescalero Apache. The VerDate jul<14>2003 17:15 Mar 31, 2005 Jkt 205001 human remains originate from the Mescalero Reservation. The presence of desiccated soft tissue indicates that the human remains may be of relatively recent age. Although the lands from which the human remains originate are currently under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, the American Museum of Natural History has control of the human remains since their removal from tribal land predates the permit requirements established by the Antiquities Act of 1906. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Nell Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192, telephone (212) 769-5837, before May 2, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains to the Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: February 11, 2005. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–6461 Filed 3–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the PO 00000 Frm 00047 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 16837 completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Duke Island, AK. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by Field Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Angoon Community Association, Cape Fox Corporation, Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes, Chilkat Indian Village (Klukwan), Chilkoot Indian Association (Haines), Craig Community Association, Douglas Indian Association, Hoonah Indian Association, Ketchikan Indian Corporation, Klawock Cooperative Association, Organized Village of Kake, Organized Village of Saxman, Petersburg Indian Association, Sitka Tribe of Alaska, Wrangell Cooperative Association, and Yakutat Tlingit Tribe. In July 1897, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from a grave house on Duke Island, near Old Tongass, AK, by George A. Dorsey for the Field Museum of Natural History. The 1896–1897 Annual Report of the Director to the Board of Trustees describes a four-month trip that assistant curator of anthropology George A. Dorsey and museum photographer Edward Allen made ‘‘among the Indians of the far West,’’ that included a visit to the ‘‘Tlingit’’ tribe. The report states that a single skeleton of a shaman was secured from the Tlingit tribe. No known individual was identified. The nine associated funerary objects are a bentwood box with lid, a fringed and painted apron, a decorated and fringed leather pouch, a fringed leather pouch, an inlaid pipe, a knife, a stick, a labret, and a peg. The human remains have been identified as Native American, based on the specific cultural and geographic attribution in Field Museum of Natural History records. The records identify the human remains as a female Tlingit shaman from ‘‘Duke Island, near Old Tongas, Alaska.’’ Scholarly publications and consultation information provided E:\FR\FM\01APN1.SGM 01APN1 16838 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 62 / Friday, April 1, 2005 / Notices by the Cape Fox Corporation indicate that Duke Island is considered to be within the traditional territory of the Tongass Tlingit of southern Alaska. The Tongass Tlingit are represented by the Cape Fox Corporation. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. (3)(A), the nine objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Cape Fox Corporation. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Helen Robbins, Repatriation Specialist, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, telephone (312) 665– 7317, before May 2, 2005. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Cape Fox Corporation may begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Field Museum is responsible for notifying the Angoon Community Association, Cape Fox Corporation, Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes, Chilkat Indian Village (Klukwan), Chilkoot Indian Association (Haines), Craig Community Association, Douglas Indian Association, Hoonah Indian Association, Ketchikan Indian Corporation, Klawock Cooperative Association, Organized Village of Kake, Organized Village of Saxman, Petersburg Indian Association, Sitka Tribe of Alaska, Wrangell Cooperative Association, Yakutat Tlingit Tribe that this notice has been published. Dated: February 11, 2005. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 05–6464 Filed 3–31–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S VerDate jul<14>2003 17:15 Mar 31, 2005 Jkt 205001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS. The human remains and cultural items were removed from archeological sites near Tupelo, MS. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the superintendent of the Natchez Trace Parkway. This notice corrects the number and types of associated funerary objects that were recovered from three of the five archeological sites reported in a notice of inventory completion published in the Federal Register on January 8, 2002, as well as the total number of associated funerary objects for the five sites. A review of Natchez Trace Parkway collections resulted in the identification of 27 additional associated funerary objects from the Alton’s Chickasaw Village site, 1 incorrectly identified associated funerary object from the Ackia Village site, and 614 additional associated funerary objects from the Bynum Mounds site, all culturally affiliated with the same tribe as described in the original notice. In the Federal Register of January 8, 2002, FR Doc. 02-385, pages 909 to 910, paragraph numbers 4, 5, 6, 8, and 12 are corrected by substituting the following paragraphs: Paragraph 4 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: The 50 human remains and 5,894 associated funerary objects described below were recovered from 5 different sites. Paragraph 5 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: In 1939, human remains representing 13 individuals were recovered from Alton’s Chickasaw Village during a PO 00000 Frm 00048 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 legally authorized National Park Service excavation to gather information on historic Chickasaw sites. No known individuals were identified. The 2,201 associated funerary objects are 2,132 glass beads and 1 bag of beads, 55 kettle fragments, 2 brass buckles, 2 ear plugs, 2 boxes of wood, 2 boxes of cloth fragments, 1 animal bone fragment, 1 bell, 1 iron hoe, 1 metal spring, and 1 box of cane fragments. Paragraph 6 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: In 1940, human remains representing 26 individuals were recovered from the Ackia Village site during a legally authorized National Park Service excavation to gather information on historic Chickasaw sites. No known individuals were identified. The 88 associated funerary objects are 28 musket balls, 16 metal spring fragments and 1 whole metal spring, 12 buttons, 7 pieces of worked bone, 5 gunflints, 4 flake tools, 2 projectile points, 2 knife fragments, 2 bracelets, 1 glass bead, 1 shell bead, 1 brass bell, 1 nail, 1 box of metal fragments, 1 stone biface, 1 scraper, 1 cup, and 1 tobacco pipe. Paragraph 8 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: In 1947 and 1948, human remains representing seven individuals were recovered from the Bynum Mounds site during a legally authorized project. No known individuals were identified. The 2,628 associated funerary objects are 2,522 glass beads, 27 metal fragments, 9 silver spoons, 9 flintlock fragments, 4 cloth fragments and 2 boxes of cloth fragments, 5 metal files, 4 metal knives, 5 wire fragments, 4 copper earrings, 4 ornaments, 4 bells, 3 metal cups, 2 shell gorgets, 2 musket balls, 2 rivets, 2 blades, 2 utensils, 1 tobacco pipe, 1 gunflint, 1 whetstone, 1 silver brooch, 1 silver crown, 1 metal spike, 1 metal spring, 1 button, 1 snuffbox, 1 powder flask, 1 ground stone, 1 polishing stone, 1 basket fragment, 1 worked antler, 1 metal screw, and 1 bag of unidentified objects. Paragraph 12 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: Based on the above-mentioned information, the superintendent of Natchez Trace Parkway has determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains of 50 individuals of Native American ancestry. The superintendent of Natchez Trace Parkway also has determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the 5,894 objects listed above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of a death rite or ceremony. Lastly, the E:\FR\FM\01APN1.SGM 01APN1

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[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 62 (Friday, April 1, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 16837-16838]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-6464]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, 
Chicago, IL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History, 
Chicago, IL. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed from Duke Island, AK.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by Field Museum of Natural History professional staff 
in consultation with representatives of the Angoon Community 
Association, Cape Fox Corporation, Central Council of the Tlingit & 
Haida Indian Tribes, Chilkat Indian Village (Klukwan), Chilkoot Indian 
Association (Haines), Craig Community Association, Douglas Indian 
Association, Hoonah Indian Association, Ketchikan Indian Corporation, 
Klawock Cooperative Association, Organized Village of Kake, Organized 
Village of Saxman, Petersburg Indian Association, Sitka Tribe of 
Alaska, Wrangell Cooperative Association, and Yakutat Tlingit Tribe.
    In July 1897, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from a grave house on Duke Island, near Old 
Tongass, AK, by George A. Dorsey for the Field Museum of Natural 
History. The 1896-1897 Annual Report of the Director to the Board of 
Trustees describes a four[macr]month trip that assistant curator of 
anthropology George A. Dorsey and museum photographer Edward Allen made 
``among the Indians of the far West,'' that included a visit to the 
``Tlingit'' tribe. The report states that a single skeleton of a shaman 
was secured from the Tlingit tribe. No known individual was identified. 
The nine associated funerary objects are a bentwood box with lid, a 
fringed and painted apron, a decorated and fringed leather pouch, a 
fringed leather pouch, an inlaid pipe, a knife, a stick, a labret, and 
a peg.
    The human remains have been identified as Native American, based on 
the specific cultural and geographic attribution in Field Museum of 
Natural History records. The records identify the human remains as a 
female Tlingit shaman from ``Duke Island, near Old Tongas, Alaska.'' 
Scholarly publications and consultation information provided

[[Page 16838]]

by the Cape Fox Corporation indicate that Duke Island is considered to 
be within the traditional territory of the Tongass Tlingit of southern 
Alaska. The Tongass Tlingit are represented by the Cape Fox 
Corporation.
    Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9[macr]10), the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of one individual of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural 
History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. (3)(A), the 
nine objects described above are reasonably believed to have been 
placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or 
later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the 
Field Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that 
can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects and the Cape Fox Corporation.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Helen Robbins, Repatriation Specialist, Field 
Museum of Natural History, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, 
telephone (312) 665-7317, before May 2, 2005. Repatriation of the human 
remains and associated funerary objects to the Cape Fox Corporation may 
begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Field Museum is responsible for notifying the Angoon Community 
Association, Cape Fox Corporation, Central Council of the Tlingit & 
Haida Indian Tribes, Chilkat Indian Village (Klukwan), Chilkoot Indian 
Association (Haines), Craig Community Association, Douglas Indian 
Association, Hoonah Indian Association, Ketchikan Indian Corporation, 
Klawock Cooperative Association, Organized Village of Kake, Organized 
Village of Saxman, Petersburg Indian Association, Sitka Tribe of 
Alaska, Wrangell Cooperative Association, Yakutat Tlingit Tribe that 
this notice has been published.

    Dated: February 11, 2005.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 05-6464 Filed 3-31-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S