Boundary Establishment for Flight 93 National Memorial, 13537-13538 [05-5449]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 53 / Monday, March 21, 2005 / Notices Management, P.O. Box 581260, North Palm Springs, CA 92258; or by fax at (760) 251–4899, or by e-mail at gchill@ca.blm.gov. Documents pertinent to this proposal, including comments with the names and addresses of respondents, will be available for public review at the Palm Springs-South Coast Field Office located at 690 W. Garnet Avenue, North Palm Springs, California, or the San Diego Project Office located at 10845 Rancho Bernardo Road, Suite 102, San Diego, California, during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays, and may be published as part of the EA. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information and/or to have your name added to our mailing list contact Greg Hill at (760) 251–4840, gchill@ca.blm.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Border Mountains planning area encompasses the BLM public lands east of Otay Mesa, south of Interstate 8, and west of the California Desert Conservation Area boundary (T.17 S., R.1 E.; T.18 S., R.1 E.; T.17 S., R.2 E.; T.18 S., R.2 E.; T.17 S., R.3 E.; T.18 S., R.3 E.; T.17 S., R.4 E.; T.18 S., R.4 E.; T.17 S., R.5 E.; T.18 S., R.5 E.; T.17 S., R.6 E.; T.18 S., R.6 E.; T.17 S., R.7 E., and T.18 S., R.7 E.). Since completion of the South Coast RMP in 1994, new circumstances have prompted the need for an amendment to the plan, particularly in the Border Mountains area. The following is a summary of the major issues and new circumstances BLM proposes to address in this plan amendment. An important management action required under BLM policy and land use planning requirements is designation of Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) roads and trails. Although OHV Area designations were completed in 1994, vehicle route designations were not completed. Since 1994, the BLM has also acquired several thousand acres of public lands for which OHV Area designations have not been assigned and where roads and trails have not been inventoried. The creation of the San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Plan (MSCP) and the Otay Mountain Wilderness, along with associated land acquisitions and the changing needs and interests of the public, also necessitates a plan amendment. The MSCP, covering 85 species and intended to preserve over 170,000 acres of habitat, was signed in 1997 to meet requirements of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (as amended), and the California Natural Communities Conservation Program (NCCP). The MSCP was signed by the VerDate jul<14>2003 18:36 Mar 18, 2005 Jkt 205001 City of San Diego and 13 other jurisdictions, San Diego County, the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The MSCP identified over 24,700 acres of BLM managed public land as the Otay/ Kuchamaa Cooperative Management Area and as a ‘‘core area’’ of the MSCP. In a Memorandum of Understanding between BLM, local governments, and state and federal wildlife agencies, the BLM agreed to cooperate in the design, land acquisition, and management of the MSCP to promote biological diversity and facilitate permitting in the planning area. Since 1994 the BLM has acquired over 6,000 acres of sensitive habitat in support of the MSCP. These new federal lands and MSCP designations are not addressed by the 1994 South Coast RMP. Additional issues and concerns would be considered as identified through the public participation process. In compliance with 43 CFR 1610.4–2, the BLM requests public input on the following proposed planning criteria, which will guide development and establish ‘‘sideboards’’ for preparation of the South Coast Plan Amendment. Please submit any comments in writing to the BLM address listed above no later than 30 days from the date of this Federal Register notice. Selection of the preferred alternative will be based on the following proposed planning criteria: • Promote long-term recovery and viability of native flora and fauna. • Would not unduly burden Bureau resources and funding capability, including maintenance activities. • Would consider the ability to manage and implement approved actions relative to the urban/wildland interface, the public/private interface, and border related national security concerns. • Seek to achieve common goals set forth in the MSCP. • Selection of the preferred alternative shall be conducted in close coordination with the local jurisdictions to promote land management consistency, effectiveness, and cost efficiency across jurisdictional boundaries. Development of the South Coast RMP Amendment shall be conducted: • In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA), the Otay Mountain Wilderness Act (1999), and the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended. PO 00000 Frm 00095 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 13537 • In compliance with all applicable environmental laws, regulations and policies which address such pertinent topics as BLM’s multiple use mandate, valid existing rights, the Bureau’s energy policy, route designation, habitat and range management, and critical elements of the human environment such as ACEC’s, threatened and endangered species, cultural resources, Native American consultation, water quality, air quality, wilderness, and other topics. • In close coordination with the local jurisdictions, State, and other Federal agencies to facilitate consistency with the MSCP. • To facilitate consistency with relevant plans such as Recovery Plans prepared by the USFWS. • Such that nothing in the proposed plan amendment shall have the effect of terminating any validly issued rights-ofway or customary operation, maintenance, repair, and/or replacement activities in such rights-ofways in accordance with sections 509(a) and 701(a) of FLPMA. An interdisciplinary approach will be used to develop the plan in order to consider the variety of resource issues and concerns identified. Disciplines involved in the planning process will include specialists with expertise in outdoor recreation, archaeology, wildlife and plants, lands and realty, hydrology, soils, geographic information systems, rangeland management, minerals and geology, sociology, and economics. Gail Acheson, Field Manager, Palm Springs-South Coast Field Office. [FR Doc. 05–5457 Filed 3–18–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–40–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Boundary Establishment for Flight 93 National Memorial National Park Service. Notice of boundary establishment. AGENCY: ACTION: SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to Public Law 107–226 (116 Stat. 1345, 16 U.S.C. 431 note), dated September 24, 2002, a boundary is hereby established for Flight 93 National Memorial, located in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, to encompass lands depicted on Map No. 04–01 that was attached to Resolution 0401 issued by the Flight 93 Advisory Commission on July 30, 2004. E:\FR\FM\21MRN1.SGM 21MRN1 13538 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 53 / Monday, March 21, 2005 / Notices FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Superintendent, Flight 93 National Memorial, 109 West Main Street, Suite 104, Somerset, PA 15501–2035. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Public Law 107–226 (116 Stat. 1345, 16 U.S.C. 431 note), dated September 24, 2002, established the Flight 93 National Memorial to commemorate the passengers and crew of United Airlines Flight 93 who, on September 11, 2001, courageously gave their lives, thereby thwarting a planned attack on our Nation’s Capital. Public Law 107–226 established the Flight 93 Advisory Commission and directed the Commission to advise the Secretary of the Interior on the boundary of the memorial site. On July 30, 2004, the Commission’s Resolution 0401 advised the Secretary of the Interior to establish the boundary as depicted on Map No. 04–01. By a letter to the Commission, dated January 14, 2005, the Secretary of the Interior accepted the Commission’s advice to establish the boundary as provided in Resolution 0401. The map is on file and available for inspection in the Land Resources Program Center, Northeast Regional Office, U.S. Customs House, 200 Chestnut Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106–2988, in the Office of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, Washington, DC 20240 and in the Office of Flight 93 National Memorial, 109 West Main Street, Somerset, Pennsylvania 15501. Dated: February 7, 2005. Joanne M. Hanley, Superintendent, Flight 93 National Memorial National Park Service. [FR Doc. 05–5449 Filed 3–18–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–WH–M DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Fire Management Plan; Golden Gate National Recreation Area; Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo Counties, California; Notice of Availability Pursuant to § 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (Pub. L. 91–190, 42 U.S.C. 4321– 4347, January 1, 1970, as amended), and the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508), the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Statement identifying and evaluating three alternatives for a Fire Management Plan for Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), in northern California. SUMMARY: VerDate jul<14>2003 18:36 Mar 18, 2005 Jkt 205001 Potential impacts and mitigating measures are described for each alternative. The alternative selected after this conservation planning and environmental impact analysis process will serve as a blueprint for fire management actions for the GGNRA over the next 10–15 years. This Fire Management Plan (FMP) and Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies and analyzes two action alternatives, and a No Action alternative, to update and revise the 1993 Fire Management Plan for the GGNRA, Muir Woods National Monument and Fort Point National Historic Site; the latter two sites are administered by GGNRA. The 1993 FMP focuses primarily on natural resource management issues and needs to be revised to more fully address cultural resource concerns. In addition, the revisions will bring the FMP into conformance with current federal wildland fire policies and standards, address lands added to GGNRA since 1993, and plan for fire hazard reduction in the extensive wildland urban interface on the park’s boundary. This FMP DEIS evaluates fire management options for approximately 15,000 acres of GGNRA’s nearly 75,000 legislated acres. The planning area for the FMP contains lands in Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo counties— three of the nine counties that make up the San Francisco Bay area. Several of the smaller national park sites are within the City of San Francisco itself; remaining areas are in southern and southwestern Marin County, northwestern San Mateo County and the Phleger Estate, in southeastern San Mateo County near the Town of Woodside. The FMP planning area does not included the following lands: (1) The northern lands of GGNRA, comprising 18,000 acres north of the Bolinas-Fairfax Road in western Marin County, which are managed by the Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS) under an agreement between the two park units. Fire management responsibilities for these northern lands are addressed in the PRNS FMP (approved October 29, 2004). (2) Lands within the jurisdictional boundary of GGNRA that are not directly managed by the National Park Service. This includes the San Francisco Watershed, managed by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (with overlays of NPS easements) and the interior portion of the Presidio of San Francisco (referred to as Area B), which is managed by the Presidio Trust, a federal corporation. The coastal portion of the Presidio (Area A), PO 00000 Frm 00096 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 managed by the GGNRA, is included in the planning area. In addition to lands currently under the management of the NPS, the FMP planning area includes those lands within the legislative boundary that may pass to NPS management in the near future. These areas, all in San Mateo County, include Cattle Hill, Pedro Point, Picardo Ranch, and northern coastal bluffs along Highway 1. GGNRA was created in 1972 to preserve for public use and enjoyment certain areas of Marin and San Francisco Counties, California, possessing outstanding natural, historic, scenic, and recreational values, and in order to provide for the maintenance of needed recreational open space necessary to urban environment and planning. The legislation charged the Secretary of the Interior to ‘‘utilize the resources [of GGNRA] in a manner which will provide for recreation and educational opportunities consistent with sound principles of land use planning and management’’ and to ‘‘preserve the recreation area, as far as possible, in its natural setting, and protect it from development and uses which would destroy the scenic beauty and natural character of the area.’’[16 U.S.C. 460bb]. GGNRA protects a remarkably diverse cluster of coastal ecosystems, landscapes, and historical sites, from the rural hills of Tomales Bay and the San Mateo watershed to the scenic headlands and military outposts of the Golden Gate and the urban shorelines of San Francisco. This diversity centers on the singular geographic feature of Golden Gate, portal between the United States and the Pacific Basin, and includes a Civil War fort, an ancient redwood forest, the former Alcatraz federal penitentiary, and most of the last remaining open spaces and forests on the ocean coast of the metropolitan Bay Area. The parklands include beaches, coastal headlands, grasslands, coastal scrub, Douglas fir and coast redwood forests, freshwater and estuarine wetlands, marine terraces, and riparian corridors. GGNRA contains the highest concentration of historic buildings (over 1,250 buildings and five national historic landmark districts) in any single unit of the National Park System. In the past, wildland fire occurred naturally in the park as an important ecosystem process that kept forest fuels and vegetation structure within the natural range of variability. Past logging and fire suppression activities have lead to increased fuel loads and changes in vegetation community structure. This has increased the risk of large, highintensity wildland fire within the park, E:\FR\FM\21MRN1.SGM 21MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 53 (Monday, March 21, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 13537-13538]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-5449]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Boundary Establishment for Flight 93 National Memorial

AGENCY: National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice of boundary establishment.

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SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to Public Law 107-226 
(116 Stat. 1345, 16 U.S.C. 431 note), dated September 24, 2002, a 
boundary is hereby established for Flight 93 National Memorial, located 
in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, to encompass lands depicted on Map 
No. 04-01 that was attached to Resolution 0401 issued by the Flight 93 
Advisory Commission on July 30, 2004.

[[Page 13538]]


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Superintendent, Flight 93 National 
Memorial, 109 West Main Street, Suite 104, Somerset, PA 15501-2035.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Public Law 107-226 (116 Stat. 1345, 16 
U.S.C. 431 note), dated September 24, 2002, established the Flight 93 
National Memorial to commemorate the passengers and crew of United 
Airlines Flight 93 who, on September 11, 2001, courageously gave their 
lives, thereby thwarting a planned attack on our Nation's Capital. 
Public Law 107-226 established the Flight 93 Advisory Commission and 
directed the Commission to advise the Secretary of the Interior on the 
boundary of the memorial site. On July 30, 2004, the Commission's 
Resolution 0401 advised the Secretary of the Interior to establish the 
boundary as depicted on Map No. 04-01. By a letter to the Commission, 
dated January 14, 2005, the Secretary of the Interior accepted the 
Commission's advice to establish the boundary as provided in Resolution 
0401.
    The map is on file and available for inspection in the Land 
Resources Program Center, Northeast Regional Office, U.S. Customs 
House, 200 Chestnut Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
19106-2988, in the Office of the National Park Service, Department of 
the Interior, Washington, DC 20240 and in the Office of Flight 93 
National Memorial, 109 West Main Street, Somerset, Pennsylvania 15501.

    Dated: February 7, 2005.
Joanne M. Hanley,
Superintendent, Flight 93 National Memorial National Park Service.
[FR Doc. 05-5449 Filed 3-18-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-WH-M