Irish-American Heritage Month, 2005, 11531 [05-4756]

Download as PDF 11531 Presidential Documents Federal Register Vol. 70, No. 45 Wednesday, March 9, 2005 Title 3— Proclamation 7873 of March 4, 2005 The President Irish-American Heritage Month, 2005 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The story of the Irish in America is an important part of the history of our country. This month, we pay tribute to Americans of Irish descent who have shaped our Nation and influenced American life. Long before the great wave of Irish immigration in the 1840s, people of Irish ancestry were defining and defending our Nation. Charles Thomson, an Irishman by birth, served as Secretary of the Continental Congress and helped design the Great Seal of the United States. Irish-born Commodore John Barry fought for our country’s independence and later helped found the United States Navy. Irish Americans have been leaders in our public life, and they have retained a proud reverence for their heritage. In June 1963, President John F. Kennedy spoke to the Parliament in Dublin and told the story of the Irish Brigade, a regiment that fought valiantly for the Union and suffered terrible losses during the Civil War. Two decades after President Kennedy’s visit, President Ronald Reagan returned to his great-grandfather’s hometown in County Tipperary, Ireland, and greeted the crowd in their own Irish language. The industry, talent, and imagination of Irish Americans have enriched our commerce and our culture. Their strong record of public service has fortified our democracy. Their strong ties to family, faith, and community have strengthened our Nation’s character. The Irish are a significant reason why Americans will always be proud to call ourselves a Nation of immigrants. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 2005 as IrishAmerican Heritage Month. I call upon all Americans to observe this month by celebrating the contributions of Irish Americans to our Nation. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-ninth. W [FR Doc. 05–4756 Filed 3–8–05; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195–01–P VerDate jul<14>2003 08:39 Mar 08, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4705 Sfmt 4790 E:\FR\FM\09MRD0.SGM 09MRD0

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[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 45 (Wednesday, March 9, 2005)]
[Presidential Documents]
[Page 11531]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-4756]




                        Presidential Documents 



Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 45 / Wednesday, March 9, 2005 / 
Presidential Documents

___________________________________________________________________

Title 3--
The President

[[Page 11531]]

                Proclamation 7873 of March 4, 2005

                
Irish-American Heritage Month, 2005

                By the President of the United States of America

                A Proclamation

                The story of the Irish in America is an important part 
                of the history of our country. This month, we pay 
                tribute to Americans of Irish descent who have shaped 
                our Nation and influenced American life.

                Long before the great wave of Irish immigration in the 
                1840s, people of Irish ancestry were defining and 
                defending our Nation. Charles Thomson, an Irishman by 
                birth, served as Secretary of the Continental Congress 
                and helped design the Great Seal of the United States. 
                Irish-born Commodore John Barry fought for our 
                country's independence and later helped found the 
                United States Navy.

                Irish Americans have been leaders in our public life, 
                and they have retained a proud reverence for their 
                heritage. In June 1963, President John F. Kennedy spoke 
                to the Parliament in Dublin and told the story of the 
                Irish Brigade, a regiment that fought valiantly for the 
                Union and suffered terrible losses during the Civil 
                War. Two decades after President Kennedy's visit, 
                President Ronald Reagan returned to his great-
                grandfather's hometown in County Tipperary, Ireland, 
                and greeted the crowd in their own Irish language.

                The industry, talent, and imagination of Irish 
                Americans have enriched our commerce and our culture. 
                Their strong record of public service has fortified our 
                democracy. Their strong ties to family, faith, and 
                community have strengthened our Nation's character. The 
                Irish are a significant reason why Americans will 
                always be proud to call ourselves a Nation of 
                immigrants.

                NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the 
                United States of America, by virtue of the authority 
                vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United 
                States, do hereby proclaim March 2005 as Irish-American 
                Heritage Month. I call upon all Americans to observe 
                this month by celebrating the contributions of Irish 
                Americans to our Nation.

                IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
                fourth day of March, in the year of our Lord two 
                thousand five, and of the Independence of the United 
                States of America the two hundred and twenty-ninth.

                    (Presidential Sig.)B

[FR Doc. 05-4756
Filed 3-8-05; 8:45 am]
Billing code 3195-01-P