Technical Assistance Needs in Human Service Transportation Coordination, 11726-11728 [05-4609]

Download as PDF 11726 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 45 / Wednesday, March 9, 2005 / Notices 1. 2120–0601: Financial Responsibility for Licensed Launch Activities. Information will be used to determine if licensees have complied with financial responsibility requirements (including maximum probably loss determination) as set forth in regulations and in license orders issued by the Office of the Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. Respondents are all licensees authorized to conduct licensed launch activities. The current estimated annual reporting burden is 1,305 hours. 2. 2120–0644: License Requirements for Operation of a Launch Site. The information collected includes data required for performing launch site location analysis. The launch site license is valid for a period of 5 years. Respondents are licensees authorized to operate sites. The current estimated annual reporting burden is 1,592 hours. 3. 2120–0646: Protection of Voluntarily Submitted Information. The rule regarding the protection of voluntarily submitted information acts to ensure that certain non-required information offered by air carriers will not be disclosed. The respondents apply to be covered by this program by submitting an application letter notifying the Administrator that they wish to participate. The current estimated annual reporting burden is 5 hours. Issued in Washington, DC, on March 2, 2005. Judith D. Street, FAA Information Collection Clearance Officer, APF–100. [FR Doc. 05–4528 Filed 3–8–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–M DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Public Notice for Wavier of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance, Chippewa County International Airport, Sault Ste. Marie, MI Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice of intent of waiver with respect to land. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is considering a proposal to change a portion of the airport from aeronautical use to nonaeronautical use and to authorize the sale of the airport property. The proposal consists of 2 parcels of land, totaling approximately 17.89 acres. Current use and present condition is undeveloped land compatible with local VerDate jul<14>2003 18:06 Mar 08, 2005 Jkt 205001 commercial zoning classification. The land was acquired under the Military Installation Conversion Program, Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, Surplus Property Act of 1944. There are no impacts to the airport by allowing the airport to dispose of the property. Subject parcels may provide good commercial development opportunities for the community and are well outside airport perimeter fence limits. Approval does not constitute a commitment by the FAA to financially assist in the disposal of the subject airport property nor a determination of eligibility for grant-inaid funding from the FAA. The disposition of proceeds from the disposal of the airport property will be in accordance FAA’s Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue, published in the Federal Register on February 16, 1999. In accordance with section 47107(h) of title 49, United States Code, this notice is required to be published in the Federal Register 30 days before modifying the land-use assurance that requires the property to be used for an aeronautical purpose. DATES: Comments must be received on or before February 24, 2005. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. ˜ Marlon D. Pena, Program Manager, Federal Aviation Administration, Great Lakes Region, Detroit Airports District Office, DET–ADO 610, 11677 South Wayne Road, Romulus, Michigan 48174. Telephone Number (734) 229–2909/ FAX Number (734) 229–2950. Documents reflecting this FAA action may be reviewed at this same location or at Chippewa County International Airport, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Following is a legal description of the property located in Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, Michigan, and described as follows: Parcel 1 That portion of the following described parcel lying north and west of the centerline of Kallio Road: Part of the East 400 feet of the Southeast 1⁄4 of the Southeast 1⁄4, Section 25, Town 45 North, Range 2 West, Kinross Township, Cippewa County, Michigan, more particularly described as beginning at the Southeast corner of said Section 25; thence N01°39′02″E 232.00 feet along the East line of said Section 25 to the Southeast corner of a parcel as described in a document recorded in Llber 151, page 204, Cipppewa County Records; thence N01°39′02″E 133.22 feet along the West line of said parcel to the Southwesterly line of Highway M–80; PO 00000 Frm 00122 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 thence northwesterly 325.30 feet along a curve to the right in said Southwesterly line, having a radius of 2924.69 feet, a central angle of 06°21′11″ and a long chord bearing N53°48′29″W 324.13 feet to the West line of said East 400 feet; thence S01°39′02″W 547.04 feet along said West line to the South line of said Section 25; thence S88°04′02″E 400.00 feet to the point of beginning. Parcel 2 Part of the East 600 feet of the North 1620 feet of the North 1⁄2 of section 36, Town 45 North, Range 2 West, Kinross Township, Chippewa County, Michigan, more particularly described as commencing at the Northeast corner of said Section 36; thence S01°19′41″W 1620.09 feet along the East line of said Section 36 to the point of beginning; thence N74°04′35″W 172.64 feet; thence N31°37′27″W 308.53 feet; thence N16°42′30″E 417.85 feet; thence N01°10′10″E 595.54 feet to the North line of said Section 36, thence N88°04′02″W 382.80 feet along said North line to the West line of said East 600 feet; thence S01°19′41″W 1620.09 feet along said West line to the South line of said North 1620 feet; thence S88°04′02″E 600.03 feet along said South line to the East line of said section 36; thence N01°19′41″E 321.60 feet along said East line to the point of beginning. Issued in Romulus, Michigan on January 25, 2005. Irene R. Porter, Manager, Detroit Airports District Office, FAA, Great Lakes Region. [FR Doc. 05–4527 Filed 3–8–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–M DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Technical Assistance Needs in Human Service Transportation Coordination Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This notice is soliciting comment on technical assistance needs in human service transportation coordination. DATES: Comments must be submitted by June 15, 2005. ADDRESSES: Comments are to be submitted via fax or electronic format. Comments may be faxed to Elizabeth Solomon, United We Ride Office, at 202–366–3136. Comments submitted in electronic form may be sent to unitedweride@fta.dot.gov E:\FR\FM\09MRN1.SGM 09MRN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 45 / Wednesday, March 9, 2005 / Notices FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Elizabeth Solomon at 202–366–0242; FAX: 202–366–3136. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Personal mobility is something easily taken for granted. For many people, this means merely starting the car or walking to the subway. However, an increasing number of Americans are unable to get to work, run errands, or access medical care simply because they do not have reliable transportation. In 2000, the number of older adults was more than 30 million, and is expected to double by 2030. To date, almost 54 million people were reported to have disabilities. Many are individuals who cannot operate a vehicle because of medical conditions, disabilities, or other limitations. In addition, there are others who are unable to afford their own automobile, or live in areas without public transportation options. ‘‘Human service transportation’’ means meeting the basic, day-to-day mobility needs of transportation-disadvantaged populations, especially individuals with low-incomes, people with disabilities, and older Americans. The family of human service transportation services supported by Federal programs includes much more than dedicated buses or vans. It includes programs that reimburse consumers for taxi or public transportation use, provide bus tokens, purchase or modify private vehicles, reimburse consumers for gas and vehicle operating costs, operate school bus service, and provide technical assistance for transportation planning. There are many reasons to be concerned about human service transportation today. Specifically, the lack of transportation affects an individual’s independence and opportunity. However, human service transportation is not just about improving individual lives, it is about improving all facets of our economy, culture, and society that rely on transportation systems to work effectively at the community level. When transportation does not work, other things—our healthcare system, our economy, and our civic culture—cannot work at their best, either. Reliable transportation is both a prerequisite for a healthy economy and often the first step toward independence and opportunity for people with low incomes, older adults, and people with disabilities. Individuals who are transportation-disadvantaged face different challenges in accessing services depending on whether they live in urban, rural, or suburban areas. The geographic dispersion of transportationdisadvantaged populations also creates VerDate jul<14>2003 20:21 Mar 08, 2005 Jkt 205001 challenges for human service programs hoping to deliver transportation for their consumers. In recognition of the fundamental importance of human service transportation and the continuing need to enhance coordination to maximize mobility, President Bush issued Executive Order 13330 on Human Service Transportation, in February 2004, directing 10 Federal departments and agencies to work together to ensure that transportation services are seamless, comprehensive and accessible. The Executive Order includes establishing a new Interagency Transportation Coordinating Council on Access and Mobility (CCAM). Specifically, the CCAM is tasked with seeking ways to simplify access to transportation services for persons with disabilities, persons with lower incomes, and older adults. The Executive Order requires that CCAM work together to provide the most appropriate, cost effective services within existing resources, and reduce duplication to make funds available for more services. During the past year, the CCAM has launched United We Ride, a national initiative to implement the Executive Order, which is intended to simplify access, reduce duplication of Federal rules and regulations, and increase cost efficiencies using existing resources. To affectively implement United We Ride, the CCAM has developed a comprehensive action plan. Issues for Exploration One of the consistent needs identified by Council members is the provision of technical assistance to provide transportation agencies, human service providers, consumers, and other community agencies with specific knowledge and information related to human service transportation. Technical assistance (TA) is a process within a dynamic context that enables a goal focused, strategy oriented, accountable organization to transfer knowledge to clients for the purpose of their growth, change, and improvement (National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System, 2001). TA is intended to provide extensive information and assistance to facilitate adoption or application of research-based or practice-based products, policies, or knowledge in order to improve the provision of services and ultimately impact outcomes for target populations who are the beneficiaries of the services (National Association of State Directors of Special Education, 2001). TA may include, information dissemination, training, and enhancing capacity for PO 00000 Frm 00123 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 11727 building more efficient transportation services at the local and state levels. The overarching goals of this TA is to facilitate the expansion of transportation services and options for older persons, persons with disabilities and low income persons in their local communities. A key strategy to accomplish this expansion of service is coordination of transportation programs and initiatives. We are soliciting the views of the transportation industry, human service providers, and consumers of human transportation services specifically on the TA needs in the area of human service transportation expansion through coordination and other pertinent strategies. We seek specific information about TA strategies, topics, and approaches that would be useful to facilitate enhanced coordination and transportation services for people with disabilities, older adults, and people with lower incomes at the local level. The public is invited to share their views on existing technical assistance efforts and/or identify thoughts about future options for delivering effective technical assistance to the field. Your comments can be drawn from personal and/or professional experiences you have as a human service provider, a transportation agency, a state agency, or as a consumer of transportation services. Your comments may also include familiar practices that would be valuable to share among other people who provide services, or unmet needs that you may face at the state and/or local level. Specifically, we ask that you address one or more of the following or a related issues: Topics for TA: Are there specific topics/issues that you, your community, or your agency would find useful in advancing human service transportation. Strategies for TA: What types of TA, information and/or training would be helpful to you, your community, or your agency-in advancing human service transportation coordination? What types of formats and strategies (e.g., audio, visual, face to face, internet, newsletters, peer to peer, etc.) do you find most helpful and useful for learning new information? Experiences with TA: Do you have experience and/or examples with successful technical assistance strategies that have been useful for you, your community, or your agency? Please include any additional information that you believe will be helpful for enhancing TA in the area of human service transportation coordination. E:\FR\FM\09MRN1.SGM 09MRN1 11728 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 45 / Wednesday, March 9, 2005 / Notices Listening Sessions In addition to the submission of written comments, members of the CCAM Workgroup on TA will also conduct up to five ‘‘Listening Sessions‘‘ during meetings hosted by national organizations being held across the country. Organizations interested in hosting a listening session on TA in human service transportation coordination, should submit a written request to unitedweride@fta.dot.gov no later than May 1, 2005. Date and times for listening sessions will be posted at unitedweride@fta.dot.gov. Dated: March 3, 2005. Jennifer L. Dorn, FTA Administrator. [FR Doc. 05–4609 Filed 3–8–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–57–M DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Prevention of Alcohol Misuse and Prohibited Drug Use in Transit Operations Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of random drug and alcohol testing rates. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This notice announces the random testing rates for employers subject to the Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA) drug and alcohol rules. DATES: Effective Date: March 9, 2005. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jerry Powers, Drug and Alcohol Program Manager for the Office of Safety and Security, (202) 366–2896 (telephone) and (202) 366–z7951 (fax). Electronic access to this and other documents concerning FTA’s drug and alcohol testing rules may be obtained through the FTA World Wide Web home page at http://www.fta.dot.gov, click on ‘‘Safety and Security.’’ SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FTA required large transit employers to begin drug and alcohol testing employees performing safety-sensitive functions on January 1, 1995, and to begin reporting annually by March 15 of each year beginning in 1996. The annual reporting includes the number of such employees who had a verified positive for the use of prohibited drugs, and the number of such employees who tested positive for the misuse of alcohol. Small employers commenced their FTA-required testing on January 1, 1996, and began reporting the same information as the large employers beginning March 15, 1997. VerDate jul<14>2003 18:06 Mar 08, 2005 Jkt 205001 The 1994 rules, which were updated on August 1, 2001, established a random testing rate for prohibited drugs and the misuse of alcohol. The rules require that employers conduct random drug tests at a rate equivalent to at least 50 percent of their total number of safety-sensitive employees for prohibited drug use and at least 25 percent for the misuse of alcohol. The rules provide that the drug random testing rate may be lowered to 25 percent if the ‘‘positive rate’’ for the entire transit industry is less than one percent for two preceding consecutive years. Once lowered, it may be raised to 50 percent if the positive rate equals or exceeds one percent for any one year (‘‘positive rate’’ means the number of positive results for random drug tests conducted under 49 CFR 655.45 plus the number of refusals of random tests required by 49 CFR 655.49, divided by the total number of random drug tests, plus the number of refusals of random tests required by 49 CFR 655.) The alcohol provisions provide that the random rate may be lowered to 10 percent if the ‘‘violation rate’’ for the entire transit industry is less than .5 percent for two consecutive years. It will remain at 25 percent if the ‘‘violation rate’’ is equal to or greater than .5 percent but less than one percent, and it will be raised to 50 percent if the ‘‘violation rate’’ is one percent or greater for any one year (‘‘violation rate’’ means the number of covered employees found during random tests given under 49 CFR 655.45 to have an alcohol concentration of .04 or greater, plus the number of employees who refuse a random test required by 49 CFR 655.49, divided by the total reported number of random alcohol tests plus the total number of refusals of random tests required by 49 CFR 655.) In 2004, the FTA required a random drug testing rate of 50 percent of the total number of their ‘‘safety-sensitive’’ employees for prohibited drugs based on the ‘‘positive rate’’ for random drug test data from 2001 and 2002. FTA has received and analyzed the latest available data (CY2003) from a representative sample of transit employers. Because the random drug rate was not lower than 1.0 percent for the two preceding consecutive years (1.05 percent for 2002 and 0.96 percent for 2003), the random drug testing rate will remain at 50 percent for 2005. In 2004, the FTA retained the random alcohol testing rate of 10 percent (reduced previously from 25 percent) based on the ‘‘positive rate’’ for random alcohol test data from 2002 and 2003. Because the random alcohol violation PO 00000 Frm 00124 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 rate was again lower than .5 percent for the two preceding consecutive years (0.22 for 2002 and 0.20 percent for 2003), the random alcohol testing rate will remain at 10 percent for 2005. FTA detailed reports on the drug and alcohol testing data collected from transit employers may be obtained from the Office of Safety and Security, Federal Transit Administration, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Room 9301, Washington, DC 20590, (202) 366–2896 or at http://transit-safety.volpe.dot.gov/ Publications. Issued On: March 3, 2005. Jennifer L. Dorn, Administrator. [FR Doc. 05–4532 Filed 3–8–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–57–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA–2005–20428; Notice 1] Hankook Tire America Corp., Receipt of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential Noncompliance Hankook Tire America Corp. (Hankook Tire) has determined that certain tires it produced in 2003 and 2004 do not comply with S6.5(d) of 49 CFR 571.119, Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 119, New pneumatic tires for vehicles other than passenger cars. Pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 30118(d) and 30120(h), Hankook Tire has petitioned for a determination that this noncompliance is inconsequential to motor vehicle safety and has filed an appropriate report pursuant to 49 CFR Part 573, ‘‘Defect and Noncompliance Reports.’’ This notice of receipt of an application is published under 49 U.S.C. 30118 and 30120 and does not represent any agency decision or other exercise of judgment concerning the merits of the application. A total of approximately 41,716 tires are involved, which were produced during the period April 1, 2003 through December 20, 2004. S6.5(d) of FMVSS No. 119 requires that the maximum load rating and corresponding inflation pressure of the tires be marked on the tire in both English and metric units. The noncompliant tires do not have the metric markings. Hankook believes that the noncompliance is inconsequential to motor vehicle safety and that no corrective action is warranted. Hankook states that the noncompliance does not E:\FR\FM\09MRN1.SGM 09MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 45 (Wednesday, March 9, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 11726-11728]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-4609]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Transit Administration


Technical Assistance Needs in Human Service Transportation 
Coordination

AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice; request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This notice is soliciting comment on technical assistance 
needs in human service transportation coordination.

DATES: Comments must be submitted by June 15, 2005.

ADDRESSES: Comments are to be submitted via fax or electronic format. 
Comments may be faxed to Elizabeth Solomon, United We Ride Office, at 
202-366-3136. Comments submitted in electronic form may be sent to 
unitedweride@fta.dot.gov

[[Page 11727]]


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Elizabeth Solomon at 202-366-0242; 
FAX: 202-366-3136.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Personal mobility is something easily taken 
for granted. For many people, this means merely starting the car or 
walking to the subway. However, an increasing number of Americans are 
unable to get to work, run errands, or access medical care simply 
because they do not have reliable transportation. In 2000, the number 
of older adults was more than 30 million, and is expected to double by 
2030. To date, almost 54 million people were reported to have 
disabilities. Many are individuals who cannot operate a vehicle because 
of medical conditions, disabilities, or other limitations. In addition, 
there are others who are unable to afford their own automobile, or live 
in areas without public transportation options. ``Human service 
transportation'' means meeting the basic, day-to-day mobility needs of 
transportation-disadvantaged populations, especially individuals with 
low-incomes, people with disabilities, and older Americans. The family 
of human service transportation services supported by Federal programs 
includes much more than dedicated buses or vans. It includes programs 
that reimburse consumers for taxi or public transportation use, provide 
bus tokens, purchase or modify private vehicles, reimburse consumers 
for gas and vehicle operating costs, operate school bus service, and 
provide technical assistance for transportation planning.
    There are many reasons to be concerned about human service 
transportation today. Specifically, the lack of transportation affects 
an individual's independence and opportunity. However, human service 
transportation is not just about improving individual lives, it is 
about improving all facets of our economy, culture, and society that 
rely on transportation systems to work effectively at the community 
level. When transportation does not work, other things--our healthcare 
system, our economy, and our civic culture--cannot work at their best, 
either. Reliable transportation is both a prerequisite for a healthy 
economy and often the first step toward independence and opportunity 
for people with low incomes, older adults, and people with 
disabilities. Individuals who are transportation-disadvantaged face 
different challenges in accessing services depending on whether they 
live in urban, rural, or suburban areas. The geographic dispersion of 
transportation-disadvantaged populations also creates challenges for 
human service programs hoping to deliver transportation for their 
consumers.
    In recognition of the fundamental importance of human service 
transportation and the continuing need to enhance coordination to 
maximize mobility, President Bush issued Executive Order 13330 on Human 
Service Transportation, in February 2004, directing 10 Federal 
departments and agencies to work together to ensure that transportation 
services are seamless, comprehensive and accessible. The Executive 
Order includes establishing a new Interagency Transportation 
Coordinating Council on Access and Mobility (CCAM). Specifically, the 
CCAM is tasked with seeking ways to simplify access to transportation 
services for persons with disabilities, persons with lower incomes, and 
older adults. The Executive Order requires that CCAM work together to 
provide the most appropriate, cost effective services within existing 
resources, and reduce duplication to make funds available for more 
services.
    During the past year, the CCAM has launched United We Ride, a 
national initiative to implement the Executive Order, which is intended 
to simplify access, reduce duplication of Federal rules and 
regulations, and increase cost efficiencies using existing resources. 
To affectively implement United We Ride, the CCAM has developed a 
comprehensive action plan.

Issues for Exploration

    One of the consistent needs identified by Council members is the 
provision of technical assistance to provide transportation agencies, 
human service providers, consumers, and other community agencies with 
specific knowledge and information related to human service 
transportation. Technical assistance (TA) is a process within a dynamic 
context that enables a goal focused, strategy oriented, accountable 
organization to transfer knowledge to clients for the purpose of their 
growth, change, and improvement (National Early Childhood Technical 
Assistance System, 2001). TA is intended to provide extensive 
information and assistance to facilitate adoption or application of 
research-based or practice-based products, policies, or knowledge in 
order to improve the provision of services and ultimately impact 
outcomes for target populations who are the beneficiaries of the 
services (National Association of State Directors of Special Education, 
2001). TA may include, information dissemination, training, and 
enhancing capacity for building more efficient transportation services 
at the local and state levels. The overarching goals of this TA is to 
facilitate the expansion of transportation services and options for 
older persons, persons with disabilities and low income persons in 
their local communities. A key strategy to accomplish this expansion of 
service is coordination of transportation programs and initiatives.
    We are soliciting the views of the transportation industry, human 
service providers, and consumers of human transportation services 
specifically on the TA needs in the area of human service 
transportation expansion through coordination and other pertinent 
strategies. We seek specific information about TA strategies, topics, 
and approaches that would be useful to facilitate enhanced coordination 
and transportation services for people with disabilities, older adults, 
and people with lower incomes at the local level. The public is invited 
to share their views on existing technical assistance efforts and/or 
identify thoughts about future options for delivering effective 
technical assistance to the field. Your comments can be drawn from 
personal and/or professional experiences you have as a human service 
provider, a transportation agency, a state agency, or as a consumer of 
transportation services. Your comments may also include familiar 
practices that would be valuable to share among other people who 
provide services, or unmet needs that you may face at the state and/or 
local level.
    Specifically, we ask that you address one or more of the following 
or a related issues: Topics for TA: Are there specific topics/issues 
that you, your community, or your agency would find useful in advancing 
human service transportation.
    Strategies for TA: What types of TA, information and/or training 
would be helpful to you, your community, or your agency-in advancing 
human service transportation coordination? What types of formats and 
strategies (e.g., audio, visual, face to face, internet, newsletters, 
peer to peer, etc.) do you find most helpful and useful for learning 
new information?
    Experiences with TA: Do you have experience and/or examples with 
successful technical assistance strategies that have been useful for 
you, your community, or your agency? Please include any additional 
information that you believe will be helpful for enhancing TA in the 
area of human service transportation coordination.

[[Page 11728]]

Listening Sessions

    In addition to the submission of written comments, members of the 
CCAM Workgroup on TA will also conduct up to five ``Listening 
Sessions`` during meetings hosted by national organizations being held 
across the country. Organizations interested in hosting a listening 
session on TA in human service transportation coordination, should 
submit a written request to unitedweride@fta.dot.gov no later than May 
1, 2005. Date and times for listening sessions will be posted at 
unitedweride@fta.dot.gov.

    Dated: March 3, 2005.
Jennifer L. Dorn,
FTA Administrator.
[FR Doc. 05-4609 Filed 3-8-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-57-M