Determination Under the African Growth and Opportunity Act, 78-79 [04-28715]

Download as PDF 78 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 1 / Monday, January 3, 2005 / Notices a Finding of No Significant Impact, the determination was made that it was not necessary to prepare an environmental impact statement. Issuance of these permits, as required by the ESA, was based on a finding that such permits: (1) were applied for in good faith; (2) will not operate to the disadvantage of such endangered species; and (3) are consistent with the purposes and policies set forth in section 2 of the ESA. Dated: December 27, 2004. Stephen L. Leathery, Chief, Permits, Conservation and Education Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc. 04–28739 Filed 12–30–04; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–22–S DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [I.D. 122704B] Marine Mammals; File Nos. 881–1668, 1010–1641, 782–1532, 434–1669, and 800–1664 National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Issuance of permit amendments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the following organizations and individual have been issued amendments to permits for scientific research on Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus): The Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, Alaska (Permit No. 881–1668); The Aleutians East Borough, Kodiak, Alaska (Permit No. 1010–1641); The National Marine Mammal Laboratory, NMFS, Seattle, Washington (Permit No. 782–1532); The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Corvallis, Oregon (Permit No. 434–1669); and Dr. Randall Davis, Texas A&M University, Department of Marine Biology, Galveston, Texas (Permit No. 800–1664). ADDRESSES: The amendments and related documents are available for review upon written request or by appointment in the following office(s): All permits - Permits, Conservation and Education Division, Office of Protected Resources, NMFS, 1315 EastWest Highway, Room 13705, Silver Spring, MD 20910; phone (301)713– 2289; fax (301)713–0376; Permit No. 434–1669 - Northwest Region, NMFS, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, BIN C15700, Bldg. 1, Seattle, WA VerDate jul<14>2003 14:47 Dec 30, 2004 Jkt 205001 98115–0700; phone (206)526–6150; fax (206)526–6426; and All permits - Alaska Region, NMFS, P.O. Box 21668, Juneau, AK 99802– 1668; phone (907)586–7221; fax (907)586–7249. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Tammy Adams or Amy Sloan, (301)713–2289. On June 27, 2002 , notice was published in the Federal Register (67 FR 43283) that requests for permits and permit amendments to ‘‘take’’ Steller sea lions by harassment during scientific research had been submitted by the above-named individuals/organizations. The permits and permit amendments were issued on November 12, 2002 (67 FR 697243). Amendments to these permits have been issued under the authority of the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1361 et seq.), the Regulations Governing the Taking and Importing of Marine Mammals (50 CFR part 216), the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and the regulations governing the taking, importing, and exporting of endangered and threatened species (50 CFR 222–226). These minor amendments extend the expiration date for all five permits from December 31, 2004 to December 31, 2005. These five permits authorize ‘‘takes’’ of Steller sea lions by harassment during a variety of research activities. These amendments do not authorize any additional ‘‘takes’’ of Steller sea lions. Rather, they allow the permit holders an additional 12 months to use any research-related harassment ‘‘takes’’ remaining from the 2004 permit year. Issuance of these permit amendments, as required by the ESA, was based on a finding that such permit amendments: (1) were applied for in good faith; (2) will not operate to the disadvantage of such endangered species; and (3) are consistent with the purposes and policies set forth in section 2 of the ESA. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Dated: December 27, 2004. Tammy C. Adams, Acting Chief, Permits, Conservation and Education Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc. 04–28740 Filed 12–30–04; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–22–S PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 COMMITTEE FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the African Growth and Opportunity Act December 23, 2004. Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA). ACTION: Directive to the Commissioner of Customs. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA) has determined that certain textile and apparel goods from Mozambique shall be treated as ‘‘handloomed, handmade, or folklore articles’’ and qualify for preferential treatment under the African Growth and Opportunity Act. Imports of eligible products from Mozambique with an appropriate AGOA visa will qualify for duty-free treatment. EFFECTIVE DATE: January 10, 2005 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anna Flaaten, International Trade Specialist, Office of Textiles and Apparel, U.S. Department of Commerce, (202) 482-3400. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Authority: The African Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of the Trade and Development Act of 2000, Pub. L. No. 106200) (AGOA) provides preferential tariff treatment for imports of certain textile and apparel products of beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries, including handloomed, handmade, or folklore articles of a beneficiary country that are certified as such by the competent authority in the beneficiary country. In Executive Order 13191, the President authorized CITA to consult with beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries and to determine which, if any, particular textile and apparel goods shall be treated as being handloomed, handmade, or folklore articles. (66 FR 7272). In a letter to the Commissioner of Customs dated January 18, 2001, the United States Trade Representative directed Customs to require that importers provide an appropriate export visa from a beneficiary sub-Saharan African country to obtain preferential treatment under section 112(a) of the AGOA (66 FR 7837). The first digit of the visa number corresponds to one of nine groupings of textile and apparel products that are eligible for preferential tariff treatment. Grouping ‘‘9’’ is reserved for handmade, handloomed, or folklore articles. CITA has consulted with Mozambican authorities, and has determined that handloomed fabrics, handloomed articles (e.g., handloomed rugs, scarves, place mats, and tablecloths), handmade E:\FR\FM\03JAN1.SGM 03JAN1 79 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 1 / Monday, January 3, 2005 / Notices articles made from handloomed fabrics, and the folklore articles described in the annex to this notice, if produced in and exported from Mozambique, are eligible for preferential tariff treatment under section 112(a) of the AGOA. In the letter published below, CITA directs the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection to allow duty-free entry of such products under U.S. Harmonized Tariff Schedule subheading 9819.11.27 if accompanied by an appropriate AGOA visa in grouping ‘‘9’’. D. Michael Hutchinson, Acting Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements December 23, 2004. Commissioner, Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, Washington, DC 20229. Dear Commissioner: The Committee for the Implementation of Textiles Agreements (CITA), pursuant to Sections 112(a) of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of Pub. L. No. 106-200) (AGOA) and Executive Order 13191 of January 17, 2001, has determined, effective on January 10, 2005, that the following articles shall be treated as ‘‘handloomed, handmade, and folklore articles’’ under the AGOA: (a) handloomed fabrics, handloomed articles (e.g., handloomed rugs, scarves, placemats, and tablecloths), and handmade articles made from handloomed fabrics, if made in Mozambique from fabric handloomed in Mozambique; and (b) the folklore articles described in the attachment to this letter, if made in Mozambique. Such articles are eligible for duty-free treatment only if entered under subheading 9819.11.27 and accompanied by a properly completed visa for product grouping ‘‘9’’, in accordance with the provisions of the Visa Arrangement between the Government of Mozambique and the Government of the United States Concerning Textile and Apparel Articles Claiming Preferential Tariff Treatment under Section 112 of the Trade and Development Act of 2000. After additional consultations with Mozambican authorities, CITA may determine that other textile and apparel goods shall be treated as folklore articles. Sincerely, D. Michael Hutchinson, Acting Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. ANNEX CITA has determined that the following textile and apparel goods shall be treated as folklore articles for purposes of the AGOA if made in Mozambique. Articles must be ornamented in characteristic Mozambican or regional folk style. An article may not include modern features such as zippers, elastic, elasticized fabrics, or hook-and-pile fasteners (such as velcroc or similar holding fabric). An article may not incorporate patterns that are not traditional or historical to Mozambique, such as airplanes, buses, VerDate jul<14>2003 14:47 Dec 30, 2004 Jkt 205001 cowboys, or cartoon characters and may not incorporate designs referencing holidays or festivals not common to traditional Mozambican culture, such as Halloween and Thanksgiving. Eligible folklore articles: (a) Traditional Shirt The article is a loose-fitting, straight-seamed shirt made of tie-dyed fabric. Sleeves are half to three-quarter in length. The neckline is rounded, slit, or v-shaped without collar. There is intricate embroidery around the neckline, outer trim of sleeves, and lower hem. May or may not have square-shaped breast and lower front pockets, also generally trimmed with intricate embroidery. (b) Women’s Traditional Tunic/ Mozambican Pedacos ¸ A loose flowing, straight-seamed, nontailored, full-length outer tunic, made of tiedyed or other colorful fabric. The neckline is rounded, slit, or v-shaped, without collar. There is intricate embroidery around the neckline and outer trim of sleeves. The neckline can be round or have a slit down the center front. Accompanying head wrap is a rectangular piece of matching fabric. [FR Doc. 04–28715 Filed 12–30–04; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DS–S COMMITTEE FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Adjustment of Import Limits for Certain Cotton and Man-Made Fiber Textile Products Produced or Manufactured in Indonesia December 27, 2004. Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA). ACTION: Issuing a directive to the Commissioner, Bureau of Customs and Border Protection adjusting limits. AGENCY: December 30, 2004. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ross Arnold, International Trade Specialist, Office of Textiles and Apparel, U.S. Department of Commerce, (202) 482– 4212. For information on the quota status of these limits, refer to the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection website (http://www.cbp.gov), or call (202) 344-2650. For information on embargoes and quota re-openings, refer to the Office of Textiles and Apparel website at http://otexa.ita.doc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: EFFECTIVE DATE: Authority: Section 204 of the Agricultural Act of 1956, as amended (7 U.S.C. 1854); Executive Order 11651 of March 3, 1972, as amended. the limit for Categories 347/348 to account for the special shift being returned to Category 647/648. A description of the textile and apparel categories in terms of HTS numbers is available in the CORRELATION: Textile and Apparel Categories with the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (see Federal Register notice 69 FR 4926, published on February 2, 2004). Also see 68 FR 65254, published on November 19, 2003. D. Michael Hutchinson, Acting Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements December 27, 2004. Commissioner, Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, Washington, DC 20229. Dear Commissioner: This directive amends, but does not cancel, the directive issued to you on November 13, 2003, by the Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. That directive concerns imports of certain cotton, wool, man-made fiber, silk blend and other vegetable fiber textiles and textile products, produced or manufactured in Indonesia and exported during the twelve-month period which began on January 1, 2004 and extends through December 31, 2004. Effective on December 30, 2004, you are directed to adjust the limits for the categories listed below, as provided for under the Uruguay Round Agreement on Textiles and Clothing: Category Levels in Group I 347/348 .................... 647/648 .................... Frm 00010 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 3,226,042 dozen. 6,006,332 dozen. 1 The limits have not been adjusted to account for any imports exported after December 31, 2003. The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements has determined that these actions fall within the foreign affairs exception to the rulemaking provisions of 5 U.S.C. 553(a)(1). Sincerely, D. Michael Hutchinson, Acting Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. [FR Doc.04–28713 Filed 12–30–04; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DS–S The current limit for Categories 647/ 648 is being increased for the cancellation of special shift, reducing PO 00000 Twelve-month restraint limit 1 E:\FR\FM\03JAN1.SGM 03JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 1 (Monday, January 3, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 78-79]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 04-28715]


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COMMITTEE FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS


Determination Under the African Growth and Opportunity Act

December 23, 2004.
AGENCY: Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA).

ACTION: Directive to the Commissioner of Customs.

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SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements 
(CITA) has determined that certain textile and apparel goods from 
Mozambique shall be treated as ``handloomed, handmade, or folklore 
articles'' and qualify for preferential treatment under the African 
Growth and Opportunity Act. Imports of eligible products from 
Mozambique with an appropriate AGOA visa will qualify for duty-free 
treatment.

EFFECTIVE DATE: January 10, 2005

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anna Flaaten, International Trade 
Specialist, Office of Textiles and Apparel, U.S. Department of 
Commerce, (202) 482-3400.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

    Authority: The African Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of 
the Trade and Development Act of 2000, Pub. L. No. 106-200) (AGOA) 
provides preferential tariff treatment for imports of certain 
textile and apparel products of beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
countries, including handloomed, handmade, or folklore articles of a 
beneficiary country that are certified as such by the competent 
authority in the beneficiary country. In Executive Order 13191, the 
President authorized CITA to consult with beneficiary sub-Saharan 
African countries and to determine which, if any, particular textile 
and apparel goods shall be treated as being handloomed, handmade, or 
folklore articles. (66 FR 7272).
    In a letter to the Commissioner of Customs dated January 18, 2001, 
the United States Trade Representative directed Customs to require that 
importers provide an appropriate export visa from a beneficiary sub-
Saharan African country to obtain preferential treatment under section 
112(a) of the AGOA (66 FR 7837). The first digit of the visa number 
corresponds to one of nine groupings of textile and apparel products 
that are eligible for preferential tariff treatment. Grouping ``9'' is 
reserved for handmade, handloomed, or folklore articles.
    CITA has consulted with Mozambican authorities, and has determined 
that handloomed fabrics, handloomed articles (e.g., handloomed rugs, 
scarves, place mats, and tablecloths), handmade

[[Page 79]]

articles made from handloomed fabrics, and the folklore articles 
described in the annex to this notice, if produced in and exported from 
Mozambique, are eligible for preferential tariff treatment under 
section 112(a) of the AGOA. In the letter published below, CITA directs 
the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection to allow duty-free 
entry of such products under U.S. Harmonized Tariff Schedule subheading 
9819.11.27 if accompanied by an appropriate AGOA visa in grouping 
``9''.

D. Michael Hutchinson,
Acting Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile 
Agreements.

Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements

December 23, 2004.

Commissioner,
Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, Washington, DC 20229.
    Dear Commissioner: The Committee for the Implementation of 
Textiles Agreements (CITA), pursuant to Sections 112(a) of the 
African Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of Pub. L. No. 106-200) 
(AGOA) and Executive Order 13191 of January 17, 2001, has 
determined, effective on January 10, 2005, that the following 
articles shall be treated as ``handloomed, handmade, and folklore 
articles'' under the AGOA: (a) handloomed fabrics, handloomed 
articles (e.g., handloomed rugs, scarves, placemats, and 
tablecloths), and handmade articles made from handloomed fabrics, if 
made in Mozambique from fabric handloomed in Mozambique; and (b) the 
folklore articles described in the attachment to this letter, if 
made in Mozambique. Such articles are eligible for duty-free 
treatment only if entered under subheading 9819.11.27 and 
accompanied by a properly completed visa for product grouping ``9'', 
in accordance with the provisions of the Visa Arrangement between 
the Government of Mozambique and the Government of the United States 
Concerning Textile and Apparel Articles Claiming Preferential Tariff 
Treatment under Section 112 of the Trade and Development Act of 
2000. After additional consultations with Mozambican authorities, 
CITA may determine that other textile and apparel goods shall be 
treated as folklore articles.
    Sincerely,
D. Michael Hutchinson,
Acting Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile 
Agreements.

ANNEX

CITA has determined that the following textile and apparel goods 
shall be treated as folklore articles for purposes of the AGOA if 
made in Mozambique. Articles must be ornamented in characteristic 
Mozambican or regional folk style. An article may not include modern 
features such as zippers, elastic, elasticized fabrics, or hook-and-
pile fasteners (such as velcroc or similar holding fabric). An 
article may not incorporate patterns that are not traditional or 
historical to Mozambique, such as airplanes, buses, cowboys, or 
cartoon characters and may not incorporate designs referencing 
holidays or festivals not common to traditional Mozambican culture, 
such as Halloween and Thanksgiving.

Eligible folklore articles:

(a) Traditional Shirt
The article is a loose-fitting, straight-seamed shirt made of tie-
dyed fabric. Sleeves are half to three-quarter in length. The 
neckline is rounded, slit, or v-shaped without collar. There is 
intricate embroidery around the neckline, outer trim of sleeves, and 
lower hem. May or may not have square-shaped breast and lower front 
pockets, also generally trimmed with intricate embroidery.

(b) Women's Traditional Tunic/ Mozambican Peda[ccedil]os

A loose flowing, straight-seamed, non-tailored, full-length outer 
tunic, made of tie-dyed or other colorful fabric. The neckline is 
rounded, slit, or v-shaped, without collar. There is intricate 
embroidery around the neckline and outer trim of sleeves. The 
neckline can be round or have a slit down the center front. 
Accompanying head wrap is a rectangular piece of matching fabric.
[FR Doc. 04-28715 Filed 12-30-04; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3510-DS-S